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Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
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    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

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5 Remote Warehouse Poetry- African American
4 Remote Warehouse Poetry- African American

\Blak\\al-fe bet\ (Karen & Michael Braziller Books)

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\Blak\\al-fe bet\ (Karen & Michael Braziller Books) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The lean, musical poems in this touching second collection depict a southern family after the death of its matriarch. Douglas transcribes the spirit and ghosts of one people's America in poems that are principled and tender.

Review:

"Haunted by questions of contemporary blackness, this second book by Douglas is packed with risk and conflict, but also beauty. 'Admit it,' he begins 'Passing Negro Mountain,' 'you read the title & thought/ Here we go again — / another race poem, (aren't we Post-Black?)' But he packs a lyric punch: 'Does this explain the heart? How/ one finds another, families/ intertwined like crops// on farms standing root to root.' In an explanatory epilogue to this formally various collection, Douglas writes, 'My plan was for the book to have a series of poems dedicated to the Alabama sharecropping days of my grandfather and his brothers.... Would I be accused of mining a subject that had been seen too often from a black poet? Did it matter? After all, this was a true history of my family.' Douglas invents and analyzes his invented form, the Fret, which features a six-lined stanza inspired by the guitar, but with only a handful in the finished book, a reader can be left wondering what all the fuss is about. Douglas imaginatively explores many facets of racial conflict — from birth certificates reprints to Bops, to free-verse lyrics; when the resulting collage gets caught up in chronicling of narrative particulars, the poems can become more muddled than satisfyingly fragmentary." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The 2011 Winner of the Lexi Rudnitsky Editor's Choice Award

About the Author

Mitchell L. H. Douglas is a Cave Canem Fellow and author of Cooling Board. He teaches at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He lives in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780892554218
Author:
Douglas, Mitchell L. H.
Publisher:
Persea Books
Author:
Douglas, Mitchell L.H.
Subject:
Poetry/African American
Publication Date:
20130231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
80
Dimensions:
8 x 5.5 in

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » American » African American

\Blak\\al-fe bet\ (Karen & Michael Braziller Books) New Trade Paper
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$15.95 In Stock
Product details 80 pages Persea Books - English 9780892554218 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Haunted by questions of contemporary blackness, this second book by Douglas is packed with risk and conflict, but also beauty. 'Admit it,' he begins 'Passing Negro Mountain,' 'you read the title & thought/ Here we go again — / another race poem, (aren't we Post-Black?)' But he packs a lyric punch: 'Does this explain the heart? How/ one finds another, families/ intertwined like crops// on farms standing root to root.' In an explanatory epilogue to this formally various collection, Douglas writes, 'My plan was for the book to have a series of poems dedicated to the Alabama sharecropping days of my grandfather and his brothers.... Would I be accused of mining a subject that had been seen too often from a black poet? Did it matter? After all, this was a true history of my family.' Douglas invents and analyzes his invented form, the Fret, which features a six-lined stanza inspired by the guitar, but with only a handful in the finished book, a reader can be left wondering what all the fuss is about. Douglas imaginatively explores many facets of racial conflict — from birth certificates reprints to Bops, to free-verse lyrics; when the resulting collage gets caught up in chronicling of narrative particulars, the poems can become more muddled than satisfyingly fragmentary." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , The 2011 Winner of the Lexi Rudnitsky Editor's Choice Award
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