Summer Reading B2G1 Free
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Q&A | July 20, 2015

    Jesse Ball: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Jesse Ball



    Describe your latest book. I woke up one day from a sort of daydream with an idea for a book's structure, and for the thread of that book, one... Continue »
    1. $16.80 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      A Cure for Suicide

      Jesse Ball 9781101870129

    spacer

The First Atomic Age: Scientists, Radiations, and the American Public, 1895-1945 (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology)

by

The First Atomic Age: Scientists, Radiations, and the American Public, 1895-1945 (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

At the close of the nineteenth century, the discovery of strange new forms of energy arrested the American public's attention in ways that no scientific discovery ever had before. The fascination with X-rays and radioactivity that was kindled in those early years evolved to affect the course of industry, public policy, and the cultural authority of scientists and physicians. Americans exposed themselves to radiation in ways that seem shocking now, even as knowledge about radiation, its risks, and its applications percolated through the public discourse. This groundbreaking cultural history demonstrates how the busy exchange of perspectives between researchers, popularizers, entrepreneurs, and the general public gave rise to the first nuclear culture, one whose lasting effects would later be seen in the familiar "atomic age" of the post-war twentieth century.

Synopsis:

At the close of the nineteenth century, the discovery of strange new forms of energy arrested the American public's attention in ways that no scientific discovery ever had before. The fascination with X-rays and radioactivity that was kindled in those early years evolved to affect the course of industry, public policy, and the cultural authority of scientists and physicians. Americans exposed themselves to radiation in ways that seem shocking now, even as knowledge about radiation, its risks, and its applications percolated through the public discourse. This groundbreaking cultural history demonstrates how the busy exchange of perspectives between researchers, popularizers, entrepreneurs, and the general public gave rise to the first nuclear culture, one whose lasting effects would later be seen in the familiar "atomic age" of the post-war twentieth century.

About the Author

Matthew Lavine is Assistant Professor at Mississippi State University, USA. He studies the history of science and its relationship with the broader public in the United States.

Table of Contents

1. Crazes 

2. Commodification and Democratization 

3. Backlash 

4. Toward the Second Atomic Age

Product Details

ISBN:
9781137307217
Author:
Lavine, Matthew
Publisher:
Palgrave MacMillan
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20130631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
inc: 13 illus
Pages:
260
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
Scientists, Radiations, and the American Public, 1

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Energy » Nuclear Engineering
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Nuclear

The First Atomic Age: Scientists, Radiations, and the American Public, 1895-1945 (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$95.00 In Stock
Product details 260 pages Palgrave MacMillan - English 9781137307217 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
At the close of the nineteenth century, the discovery of strange new forms of energy arrested the American public's attention in ways that no scientific discovery ever had before. The fascination with X-rays and radioactivity that was kindled in those early years evolved to affect the course of industry, public policy, and the cultural authority of scientists and physicians. Americans exposed themselves to radiation in ways that seem shocking now, even as knowledge about radiation, its risks, and its applications percolated through the public discourse. This groundbreaking cultural history demonstrates how the busy exchange of perspectives between researchers, popularizers, entrepreneurs, and the general public gave rise to the first nuclear culture, one whose lasting effects would later be seen in the familiar "atomic age" of the post-war twentieth century.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.