The Fictioning
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | September 30, 2014

    Brian Doyle: IMG The Rude Burl of Our Masks



    One day when I was 12 years old and setting off on my newspaper route after school my mom said will you stop at the doctor's and pick up something... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Film and Television- TV Programs

Other titles in the Blackwell Philosophy & Pop Culture series:

Family Guy and Philosophy: A Cure for the Petarded (Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture)

by

Family Guy and Philosophy: A Cure for the Petarded (Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

That’s right. We’ve done it. We’ve brought together lowbrow, potty-mouthed, cartoon humor and highbrow philosophical reflection. Ok, it’s not that highbrow, but the results are outrageously delicious. In Family Guy and Philosophy we tackle the perennial positions of the show and contemplate a little philosophy to boot!

Is Family Guy really a vehicle for conservative politics? What’s so funny about dysfunctional families? Should we all be offended by the show? This book gathers original essays from premier philosophers to get behind the punchlines and find out what we’re really laughing at. And of course we dive into the philosophy of the cast as well, asking the important questions, like: What the hell is wrong with Stewie? Who is more human, Peter or Brian? Is Lois a feminist? Is there anything virtuous about Quagmire?

Family Guy and Philosophy takes an introspective look at what this show can teach us about the ego, ethics, religion, death, and of course, time-travel, and delivers a merciless exploration of one of TV’s most unrelenting families.

Book News Annotation:

Wisnewski (philosophy, Hartwick College) provides the analysis and some of the funny footnotes as he and his contributors work through postmodernism, religion and religious exclusivity, virtue and perversity, clueless men (in the character's case this is an oxymoron), motherhood, deadly sins, the importance of background people, dogs with personality, the logic of expectation, humor, fallacies, plagiarism, will and wantoness in wives, ego, and death. The result is fun, if you are a fan of the show, but even if you are not you can get the point and most of the jokes. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

That's right. We've done it. We've brought together lowbrow, potty-mouthed, cartoon humor and highbrow philosophical reflection. Ok, it's not that highbrow, but the results are outrageously delicious. In Family Guy and Philosophy we tackle the perennial positions of the show and contemplate a little philosophy to boot!

Is Family Guy really a vehicle for conservative politics? What's so funny about dysfunctional families? Should we all be offended by the show? This book gathers original essays from premier philosophers to get behind the punchlines and find out what we're really laughing at. And of course we dive into the philosophy of the cast as well, asking the important questions, like: What the hell is wrong with Stewie? Who is more human, Peter or Brian? Is Lois a feminist? Is there anything virtuous about Quagmire?

Family Guy and Philosophy takes an introspective look at what this show can teach us about the ego, ethics, religion, death, and of course, time-travel, and delivers a merciless exploration of one of TV's most unrelenting families.

Synopsis:

Family Guy and Philosophy brings together low-brow, potty-mouthed, cartoon humor and high-brow philosophical reflection to deliver an outrageously hilarious and clever exploration of one of TV’s most unrelenting families. Ok, it’s not that high-brow.

  • A sharp, witty and absurd exploration of one of television’s most unrelenting families, the stars of one of the biggest-selling TV series ever on DVD, now in its fourth season

  • Tackles the perennial positions of Family Guy at the same time as contemplating poignant philosophical issues

  • Takes an introspective look at what this show can teach us about ethics, ego, religion, death, and of course, time-travel

  • Considers whether Family Guy is really a vehicle for conservative politics, and whether we should be offended by the show, as well as diving into the philosophy of the cast

About the Author

J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor at Hartwick College. He is the author of Wittgenstein and Ethical Inquiry: A Defense of Ethics as Clarification (2007) and The Politics of Agency: Toward a Pragmatic Approach to Philosophical Anthropology (2008). He is also the editor of The Office and Philosophy (Blackwell, 2008).

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments: These people are freakin’ sweet [Acknowledgments].

You Better Not Read This, Pal: An Introduction to Family Guy and Philosophy: J. Jeremy Wisnewski.

Part I. Those Good Ole’ Fashion Values on which we used to rely.

1. Killing the Griffins: A Murderous Exposition of Postmodernism: J. Jeremy Wisnewski (Hartwick College).

2. Family Guy and God: Should Believers Take Offense?: Ray J. VanArragon (Bethel University).

3. Quagmire, Virtue, and Perversity: Shaun Miller (Weber State University).

4. Francis Griffin and the Church of the Holy Fonz: Religious Exclusivism and "Real" Religion: David Kyle Johnson (King's College).

Part II. Lucky there’s a family guy! (And what a family!).

5. Let Us Now Praise Clueless Men: Peter Griffin and Philosophy: Jerry Samet (Brandeis University).

6. Lois: Portrait of a Mother (Or, Nevermind Death, Motherhood is a Bitch): Stephanie Empey (University of California, Riverside).

7. Mmmyez: Stewie and the Seven Deadly Sins: Sharon M. Kaye (John Carroll University).

8. The Other Children: The Significance of Meg and Chris: P. Sue Dohnimm.

9. He Thinks He’s People: How Brian Made Personhood for the Dogs: Daniel Malloy (Appalachian State University).

Part III. He-he-he-he-he. You expected more lyrics, but you’re getting logic, comedy, and the logic of comedy.

10. The Logic of Expectation: Family Guy and the Non Sequitur: Jonah P.B. Goldwater (Baruch College).

11. What Are You Laughing At (And Why)? Exploring the Humor of Family Guy: Andrew Terjesen (Washington and Lee University).

12. Thinkin’ is Freakin’ Sweet: Family Guy and Fallacies: Robert Arp (Florida State University).

13. The Simpsons Already Did It! This Show Is A Freakin’ Rip-Off!: Shai Biderman (Boston University) and William J. Devlin (Boston University).

Part IV. Family Problems.

14. Is Brian More of a “Person” than Peter? Of Wills, Wantons, and Wives: Mark D. White (College of Staten Island).

15. The Ego is a Housewife Named Lois: Robert Sharp (University of Alabama).

16. The Lives and Times of Stewie Griffin: Tuomas Manninen (Arizona State University West).

17. Kierkegaard and the Norm (MacDonald) of Death: Adam Buben (University of South Florida).

Appendix: Everything you ever needed to know about Meg Griffin, as compiled by the contributors.

Notes on Contributors: What the deuce!?! They’re real! (Most of them, anyway) [Contributor Bios].

Index: He-he-he-he-he-he … You read books [Index]

Product Details

ISBN:
9781405163163
Author:
Wisnewski, J Jeremy
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Editor:
Wisnewski, Jeremy
Editor:
Wisnewski, J. Jeremy
Author:
Wisnewski, J. Jeremy
Author:
Wisnewski, Jeremy
Subject:
General
Subject:
Television - General
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
General Philosophy
Subject:
Philosophy : General
Copyright:
Series:
T he Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series
Series Volume:
9
Publication Date:
September 2007
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9.00x6.37x.48 in. .69 lbs.

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Reference
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » TV Programs
Engineering » Communications » Television
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Family Guy and Philosophy: A Cure for the Petarded (Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 232 pages Blackwell Publishers - English 9781405163163 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , That's right. We've done it. We've brought together lowbrow, potty-mouthed, cartoon humor and highbrow philosophical reflection. Ok, it's not that highbrow, but the results are outrageously delicious. In Family Guy and Philosophy we tackle the perennial positions of the show and contemplate a little philosophy to boot!

Is Family Guy really a vehicle for conservative politics? What's so funny about dysfunctional families? Should we all be offended by the show? This book gathers original essays from premier philosophers to get behind the punchlines and find out what we're really laughing at. And of course we dive into the philosophy of the cast as well, asking the important questions, like: What the hell is wrong with Stewie? Who is more human, Peter or Brian? Is Lois a feminist? Is there anything virtuous about Quagmire?

Family Guy and Philosophy takes an introspective look at what this show can teach us about the ego, ethics, religion, death, and of course, time-travel, and delivers a merciless exploration of one of TV's most unrelenting families.

"Synopsis" by , Family Guy and Philosophy brings together low-brow, potty-mouthed, cartoon humor and high-brow philosophical reflection to deliver an outrageously hilarious and clever exploration of one of TV’s most unrelenting families. Ok, it’s not that high-brow.

  • A sharp, witty and absurd exploration of one of television’s most unrelenting families, the stars of one of the biggest-selling TV series ever on DVD, now in its fourth season

  • Tackles the perennial positions of Family Guy at the same time as contemplating poignant philosophical issues

  • Takes an introspective look at what this show can teach us about ethics, ego, religion, death, and of course, time-travel

  • Considers whether Family Guy is really a vehicle for conservative politics, and whether we should be offended by the show, as well as diving into the philosophy of the cast

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.