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Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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Lonesome West (Student Editions) (Modern Plays)

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Lonesome West (Student Editions) (Modern Plays) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Lonesome West was first presented as a Druid Theatre Company and Royal Court coproduction in the summer of 1997, and is the final part of McDonaghs trilogy set in an fictionalized and impoverished western Ireland village called Leenane. Its substantial themes and textured controversy make it a popular choice to study—the Catholic Church is exposed as irrelevant and powerless and the characters have a dangerously skewed sense of morality. The text is full of McDonaghs characteristic combination of farce, aggression, and wit. The plot follows two brothers, Valene and Coleman, living alone in their fathers house after his recent death. They find it impossible to exist without massive and violent disputes over the most mundane and innocent of topics. Only Father Welsh, the young local priest, is prepared to try to reconcile the two before their petty squabblings spiral into vicious and bloody carnage. Martin McDonagh is the most controversial Irish dramatist working today, with his explorations of Irish national identity that look at the darker side of provincial life. His bleak but blackly comic portrayal of modern, rural Ireland courts debate with its dark farce, caricatures of violence and barbarism, and an exaggerated, poeticized dialect of Hiberno-English.

 

Martin McDonagh's first play The Beauty Queen of Leenane was nominated for six Tony awards, of which it won four, and the Laurence Olivier Award. In 2003, his play The Pillowman had its world premiere at the Royal National Theatre and received the 2004 Olivier Award. In 2006, Martin McDonagh won an Oscar for his short film Six Shooter.
 
The Lonesome West was first presented as a Druid Theatre Company and Royal Court coproduction in the summer of 1997, and is the final part of McDonaghs trilogy set in an fictionalized and impoverished western Ireland village called Leenane. Its substantial themes and textured controversy make it a popular choice to study—the Catholic Church is exposed as irrelevant and powerless and the characters have a dangerously skewed sense of morality. The text is full of McDonaghs characteristic combination of farce, aggression, and wit. The plot follows two brothers, Valene and Coleman, living alone in their fathers house after his recent death. They find it impossible to exist without massive and violent disputes over the most mundane and innocent of topics. Only Father Welsh, the young local priest, is prepared to try to reconcile the two before their petty squabblings spiral into vicious and bloody carnage. Martin McDonagh is the most controversial Irish dramatist working today, with his explorations of Irish national identity that look at the darker side of provincial life. His bleak but blackly comic portrayal of modern, rural Ireland courts debate with its dark farce, caricatures of violence and barbarism, and an exaggerated, poeticized dialect of Hiberno-English.
Martin McDonagh is the most controversial Irish dramatist working today, with his explorations of Irish national identity that look at the darker side of provincial life. His bleak but blackly comic portrayal of modern, rural Ireland courts debate with its dark farce, caricatures of violence and barbarism, and an exaggerated, poeticized dialect of Hiberno-English.
“A powerful writer of staying power and an individual talent within a powerful tradition.”—The Sunday Times of London

Synopsis:

Martin McDonagh is the most controversial Irish dramatist working today, with his explorations of Irish national identity that look at the darker side of provincial life. His bleak but blackly comic portrayal of modern, rural Ireland courts debate with its dark farce, caricatures of violence and barbarism, and an exaggerated, poeticized dialect of Hiberno-English.

Synopsis:

The Lonesome West was first presented as a Druid Theatre Company and Royal Court coproduction in the summer of 1997, and is the final part of McDonaghs trilogy set in an fictionalized and impoverished western Ireland village called Leenane. Its substantial themes and textured controversy make it a popular choice to study—the Catholic Church is exposed as irrelevant and powerless and the characters have a dangerously skewed sense of morality. The text is full of McDonaghs characteristic combination of farce, aggression, and wit. The plot follows two brothers, Valene and Coleman, living alone in their fathers house after his recent death. They find it impossible to exist without massive and violent disputes over the most mundane and innocent of topics. Only Father Welsh, the young local priest, is prepared to try to reconcile the two before their petty squabblings spiral into vicious and bloody carnage. Martin McDonagh is the most controversial Irish dramatist working today, with his explorations of Irish national identity that look at the darker side of provincial life. His bleak but blackly comic portrayal of modern, rural Ireland courts debate with its dark farce, caricatures of violence and barbarism, and an exaggerated, poeticized dialect of Hiberno-English.

 

About the Author

Martin McDonagh's first play The Beauty Queen of Leenane was nominated for six Tony awards, of which it won four, and the Laurence Olivier Award. In 2003, his play The Pillowman had its world premiere at the Royal National Theatre and received the 2004 Olivier Award. In 2006, Martin McDonagh won an Oscar for his short film Six Shooter.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781408125762
Author:
Mcdonagh, Martin
Publisher:
Methuen Publishing
Editor:
Lonergan, Patrick
Author:
Lonergan, Patrick
Author:
McDonagh, Martin
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
Drama
Subject:
British & Irish
Subject:
Drama-Women and Ethnic
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Series:
Modern Plays
Publication Date:
20101131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
n/a
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
8 x 5 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » British and Irish Anthologies
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Plays
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Women and Ethnic
Business » General
Children's » General

Lonesome West (Student Editions) (Modern Plays) New Trade Paper
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Product details 160 pages Methuen - English 9781408125762 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Martin McDonagh is the most controversial Irish dramatist working today, with his explorations of Irish national identity that look at the darker side of provincial life. His bleak but blackly comic portrayal of modern, rural Ireland courts debate with its dark farce, caricatures of violence and barbarism, and an exaggerated, poeticized dialect of Hiberno-English.
"Synopsis" by ,

The Lonesome West was first presented as a Druid Theatre Company and Royal Court coproduction in the summer of 1997, and is the final part of McDonaghs trilogy set in an fictionalized and impoverished western Ireland village called Leenane. Its substantial themes and textured controversy make it a popular choice to study—the Catholic Church is exposed as irrelevant and powerless and the characters have a dangerously skewed sense of morality. The text is full of McDonaghs characteristic combination of farce, aggression, and wit. The plot follows two brothers, Valene and Coleman, living alone in their fathers house after his recent death. They find it impossible to exist without massive and violent disputes over the most mundane and innocent of topics. Only Father Welsh, the young local priest, is prepared to try to reconcile the two before their petty squabblings spiral into vicious and bloody carnage. Martin McDonagh is the most controversial Irish dramatist working today, with his explorations of Irish national identity that look at the darker side of provincial life. His bleak but blackly comic portrayal of modern, rural Ireland courts debate with its dark farce, caricatures of violence and barbarism, and an exaggerated, poeticized dialect of Hiberno-English.

 

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