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1 Burnside African American Studies- General

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The Black Girl Next Door: A Memoir

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The Black Girl Next Door: A Memoir Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;iandgt;andlt;bandgt;andlt;BRandgt; A powerful, beautifully written memoir about coming of age as a black girl in an exclusive white suburb in "integrated," post-Civil Rights California in the 1970s and 1980s. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;/bandgt;andlt;/iandgt; andlt;BRandgt; At six years of age, after winning a foot race against a white classmate, Jennifer Baszile was humiliated to hear her classmate explain that black people "have something in their feet to make them run faster than white people." When she asked her teacher about it, it was confirmed as true. The next morning, Jennifer's father accompanied her to school, careful to "assert himself as an informed and concerned parent and not simply a big, black, dangerous man in a first-grade classroom." andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; This was the first of many skirmishes in Jennifer's childhood-long struggle to define herself as "the black girl next door" while living out her parents' dreams. Success for her was being the smartest and achieving the most, with the consequence that much of her girlhood did not seem like her own but more like the "family project." But integration took a toll on everyone in the family when strain in her parents' marriage emerged in her teenage years, and the struggle to be the perfect black family became an unbearable burden. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt; A deeply personal view of a significant period of American social history, andlt;iandgt;The Black Girl Next Doorandlt;/iandgt; deftly balances childhood experiences with adult observations, creating an illuminating and poignant look at a unique time in our country's history.

Synopsis:

A powerful, beautifully written memoir about coming of age as a black girl in an exclusive white suburb in "integrated," post-Civil Rights California in the 1970s and 1980s.

At six years of age, after winning a foot race against a white classmate, Jennifer Baszile was humiliated to hear her classmate explain that black people "have something in their feet to make them run faster than white people." When she asked her teacher about it, it was confirmed as true. The next morning, Jennifer's father accompanied her to school, careful to "assert himself as an informed and concerned parent and not simply a big, black, dangerous man in a first-grade classroom."

This was the first of many skirmishes in Jennifer's childhood-long struggle to define herself as "the black girl next door" while living out her parents' dreams. Success for her was being the smartest and achieving the most, with the consequence that much of her girlhood did not seem like her own but more like the "family project." But integration took a toll on everyone in the family when strain in her parents' marriage emerged in her teenage years, and the struggle to be the perfect black family became an unbearable burden.

A deeply personal view of a significant period of American social history, The Black Girl Next Door deftly balances childhood experiences with adult observations, creating an illuminating and poignant look at a unique time in our country's history.

About the Author

andlt;bandgt;Jennifer Baszileandlt;/bandgt; received her B.A. from Columbia and her Ph.D. in American history from Princeton. She was the first black female professor to join Yale University's history department and has been named one of the "Thirty Leaders of the Future" by andlt;iandgt;Ebonyandlt;/iandgt; magazine. She lives in Connecticut.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781416543282
Author:
Baszile, Jennifer
Publisher:
Touchstone Books
Author:
Baszile, Jennifer Lynn
Subject:
History
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Baszile, Jennifer Lynn - Childhood and youth
Subject:
African American women - California -
Subject:
cultural heritage
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Series:
Touchstone Books
Publication Date:
20091231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b-w photos t-o
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 9.59 oz

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Related Subjects


Biography » General
Biography » Literary
Biography » Women
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General

The Black Girl Next Door: A Memoir Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Touchstone Books - English 9781416543282 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

A powerful, beautifully written memoir about coming of age as a black girl in an exclusive white suburb in "integrated," post-Civil Rights California in the 1970s and 1980s.

At six years of age, after winning a foot race against a white classmate, Jennifer Baszile was humiliated to hear her classmate explain that black people "have something in their feet to make them run faster than white people." When she asked her teacher about it, it was confirmed as true. The next morning, Jennifer's father accompanied her to school, careful to "assert himself as an informed and concerned parent and not simply a big, black, dangerous man in a first-grade classroom."

This was the first of many skirmishes in Jennifer's childhood-long struggle to define herself as "the black girl next door" while living out her parents' dreams. Success for her was being the smartest and achieving the most, with the consequence that much of her girlhood did not seem like her own but more like the "family project." But integration took a toll on everyone in the family when strain in her parents' marriage emerged in her teenage years, and the struggle to be the perfect black family became an unbearable burden.

A deeply personal view of a significant period of American social history, The Black Girl Next Door deftly balances childhood experiences with adult observations, creating an illuminating and poignant look at a unique time in our country's history.

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