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Ain't Nothing But a Man: My Quest to Find the Real John Henry

by

Ain't Nothing But a Man: My Quest to Find the Real John Henry Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Who was the real John Henry? The story of this legendary African-American figure has come down to us in so many songs, stories, and plays, that the facts are often lost. Historian Scott Nelson brings John Henry alive for young readers in his personal quest for the true story of the man behind the myth. Nelson presents the famous folk song as a mystery to be unraveled, identifying the embedded clues within the lyrics, which he examines to uncover many surprising truths. He investigates the legend and reveals the real John Henry in this beautifully illustrated book.

Nelsons narrative is multilayered, interweaving the story of the building of the railroads, the period of Reconstruction, folk tales, American mythology, and an exploration of the tradition of work songs and their evolution into blues and rock and roll. This is also the story of the authors search for the flesh-and-blood man who became an American folk hero; Nelson gives a first-person account of how the historian works, showing history as a process of discovery. Readers rediscover an African-American folk hero. We meet John Henry, the man who worked for the railroad, driving steel spikes. When the railroad threatens to replace workers with a steam-powered hammer, John Henry bets that he can drive the beams into the ground faster than the machine. He wins the contest, but dies in the effort.

Nelsons vibrant text, combined with archival images, brings a new perspective and focus to the life and times of this American legend.

Review:

"Nelson (Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry, The Untold Story of an American Legend) offers a highly accessible version of his research into whether or not the John Henry of folksong fame was a real person. Piecing together a panoply of facts and personal anecdotes that go back to his boyhood, the author models the study of history as an active and passionate pursuit: 'For years I had been following a trail, and it was stone cold.... And then... I suddenly saw it, the clue that changed everything.' This cliffhanger at the end of the first chapter draws readers into Nelson's journey through the song lyrics, old prison documents, maps, photographs and other primary and secondary sources. From 'trackliners' (workers, often African-American, who aligned rails) to steam drills to Civil War history, the first-person narrative follows Nelson as he plays detective. Seemingly diverse information presented in each of nine chapters becomes knit together by the conclusion, and visually unified by an aesthetically pleasingly layout that features a reddish brick palette with tinted photos and prints. One graphic — and telling — photo reveals the remains of two African-African men discovered on the grounds of a Virginia prison: John Henry, posits the author, was part of a huge prisoner work force hired out to tunnel through mountains for the railroad companies. Convincing and dramatic, this volume makes a good case that history is a living science. Ages 10-14." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

About the Author

Author and historian Scott Reynolds Nelson is the Legum Professor of History at The College of William and Mary in Virginia. His previous book on John Henry, Steel Drivin Man, was awarded the Organization of American Historians Merle Curti Prize and an Anisfield-Wolf award. He lives in Williamsburg, Virginia.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781426300004
Author:
Nelson, Scott
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
With:
Aronson, Marc
Author:
Aronson, Marc
Author:
Nelson, Scott Reynolds
Subject:
History - United States/19th Century
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography - Historical
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography - Cultural Heritage
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Description and travel
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
Southern States Description and travel.
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Biography
Subject:
history;research;railroads;biography;folklore;non-fiction;john henry
Publication Date:
20071231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 5 up to 9
Language:
English
Illustrations:
50 2-COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS
Pages:
64
Dimensions:
11.00x9.38x.42 in. 1.21 lbs.
Age Level:
10-14

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Related Subjects

Children's » Activities » General
Children's » History » United States » General
Children's » Nonfiction » African American Studies
Children's » Nonfiction » Biographies
Children's » Nonfiction » US History
Children's » Nonfiction » World Cultures
Children's » People and Cultures
History and Social Science » World History » General
Young Adult » Nonfiction » Biographies

Ain't Nothing But a Man: My Quest to Find the Real John Henry New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.95 In Stock
Product details 64 pages National Geographic Society - English 9781426300004 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Nelson (Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry, The Untold Story of an American Legend) offers a highly accessible version of his research into whether or not the John Henry of folksong fame was a real person. Piecing together a panoply of facts and personal anecdotes that go back to his boyhood, the author models the study of history as an active and passionate pursuit: 'For years I had been following a trail, and it was stone cold.... And then... I suddenly saw it, the clue that changed everything.' This cliffhanger at the end of the first chapter draws readers into Nelson's journey through the song lyrics, old prison documents, maps, photographs and other primary and secondary sources. From 'trackliners' (workers, often African-American, who aligned rails) to steam drills to Civil War history, the first-person narrative follows Nelson as he plays detective. Seemingly diverse information presented in each of nine chapters becomes knit together by the conclusion, and visually unified by an aesthetically pleasingly layout that features a reddish brick palette with tinted photos and prints. One graphic — and telling — photo reveals the remains of two African-African men discovered on the grounds of a Virginia prison: John Henry, posits the author, was part of a huge prisoner work force hired out to tunnel through mountains for the railroad companies. Convincing and dramatic, this volume makes a good case that history is a living science. Ages 10-14." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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