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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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    Juliet's Nurse

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The Count of Concord (American Literature)

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Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"From humble beginnings in colonial New Hampshire through to the courts of imperial Europe, Delbanco (Spring and Fall) imaginatively maps the deeds, misdeeds and accomplishments of the real-life polymath Benjamin Thompson (1753 — 1814), an American contemporary of Franklin and Jefferson, and their equal in scientific inquiry and sociological (if not philosophical) thought. Thompson has been neglected by American history because he was a Tory — i.e., he sided with the British during the Revolution — who was eventually made a count of the Holy Roman Empire under Francis II. Delbanco covers that material nicely, but is equally interested in Thompson's cunning study of household thermodynamics and horticulture, and his invention of such appliances as roasters and coffee pots. Along the way, Delbanco celebrates Thompson's social reforms and innovation (Thompson patented none of his gadgets, believing that they should belong to the poor) and his military genius, while casually detailing the married Thompson's libertine lifestyle and varied sexual peccadilloes. Unfortunately, the story is told from the point of view of Sally Ormsby Thompson Robinson, Thompson's fictional present-day descendant: her rat-a-tat voice is often intrusive, and the whole ends up more a collection of variously colorful set pieces than a character-driven novel." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford, was--as Nicholas Delbanco writes--world famous in his lifetime, yet now he has been almost wholly forgotten. Like Delbanco himself, Sally Ormsby Thompson Robinson--the narrator of this novel and the Count's fictional, last-surviving relative--is haunted by one of history's most fascinating and remarkable figures. On par with Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, Count Rumford was, among many other things, a politician, a spy, a philanthropist, and above all, a scientist. Based on countless historical documents, including letters and essays by Thompson himself. The Count of Concord brings to life the remarkable career of Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781564784957
Author:
Delbanco, Nicholas
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Subject:
Rumford, Benjamin
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Biographical fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Dalkey Archive
Series:
American Literature
Publication Date:
20080531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
478
Dimensions:
8.92x6.26x1.35 in. 1.59 lbs.

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The Count of Concord (American Literature) New Trade Paper
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Product details 478 pages Dalkey Archive Press - English 9781564784957 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "From humble beginnings in colonial New Hampshire through to the courts of imperial Europe, Delbanco (Spring and Fall) imaginatively maps the deeds, misdeeds and accomplishments of the real-life polymath Benjamin Thompson (1753 — 1814), an American contemporary of Franklin and Jefferson, and their equal in scientific inquiry and sociological (if not philosophical) thought. Thompson has been neglected by American history because he was a Tory — i.e., he sided with the British during the Revolution — who was eventually made a count of the Holy Roman Empire under Francis II. Delbanco covers that material nicely, but is equally interested in Thompson's cunning study of household thermodynamics and horticulture, and his invention of such appliances as roasters and coffee pots. Along the way, Delbanco celebrates Thompson's social reforms and innovation (Thompson patented none of his gadgets, believing that they should belong to the poor) and his military genius, while casually detailing the married Thompson's libertine lifestyle and varied sexual peccadilloes. Unfortunately, the story is told from the point of view of Sally Ormsby Thompson Robinson, Thompson's fictional present-day descendant: her rat-a-tat voice is often intrusive, and the whole ends up more a collection of variously colorful set pieces than a character-driven novel." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford, was--as Nicholas Delbanco writes--world famous in his lifetime, yet now he has been almost wholly forgotten. Like Delbanco himself, Sally Ormsby Thompson Robinson--the narrator of this novel and the Count's fictional, last-surviving relative--is haunted by one of history's most fascinating and remarkable figures. On par with Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, Count Rumford was, among many other things, a politician, a spy, a philanthropist, and above all, a scientist. Based on countless historical documents, including letters and essays by Thompson himself. The Count of Concord brings to life the remarkable career of Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford.
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