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Paradoxes of Peace: Or, the Presence of Infinity (British Literature)

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Paradoxes of Peace: Or, the Presence of Infinity (British Literature) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"This slim yet largely torturous memoir covers Whitbread winner Mosley's two marriages totaling almost 60 years, several love affairs, a religious crisis and much else. Now wheelchair-bound and in his 80s, the novelist and screenwriter delves into his dysfunctional family background, which includes his father, Oswald Mosley, who gave his life to the Fascist cause, plus a mother, Oswald Mosley's first wife, who gave her short life to this man. Mosley had a stammer, which he several times attributes to a mechanism of self-defense, and ultimately found himself in analysis.The childhood pattern of self-service as a means of survival continues into maturity: when one wife dies, the next organizes her funeral.The title refers to Mosley's lifelong acceptance of paradox within a Christian setting. His meeting with a charismatic Anglican minister proves essential in setting Mosley on a path to editing a monthly called Prism and to come to grips with his extramarital loves: 'the proper working-out of difficult fate or chance does not seem to favour persons who keep to rules so much as those who trust and are ready to take off and fly.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Nicholas was 11 years old when his father, Sir Oswald Mosley (1896-1980), formed the British alliance of fascists in 1932. In his memoir Time at War, he recounts how he struggled to love his father and repudiate his politics while attending elite schools and serving with British forces in Italy during World War II. He concluded that war is easier than peace for people, because they know what they are supposed to do. Now a successful novelist, he describes loving his wife and children during peacetime, wondering how to keep caring from becoming a trap. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781564785398
Author:
Mosley, Nicholas.
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Author:
Mosley, Nicholas
Subject:
Authors, English
Subject:
Editors
Subject:
General
Subject:
Authors, English -- 20th century.
Subject:
Biographers - Great Britain
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Series:
British Literature
Publication Date:
20090331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
190
Dimensions:
8.02x5.64x.49 in. .50 lbs.

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Writing
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » General

Paradoxes of Peace: Or, the Presence of Infinity (British Literature) New Trade Paper
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Product details 190 pages Dalkey Archive Press - English 9781564785398 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This slim yet largely torturous memoir covers Whitbread winner Mosley's two marriages totaling almost 60 years, several love affairs, a religious crisis and much else. Now wheelchair-bound and in his 80s, the novelist and screenwriter delves into his dysfunctional family background, which includes his father, Oswald Mosley, who gave his life to the Fascist cause, plus a mother, Oswald Mosley's first wife, who gave her short life to this man. Mosley had a stammer, which he several times attributes to a mechanism of self-defense, and ultimately found himself in analysis.The childhood pattern of self-service as a means of survival continues into maturity: when one wife dies, the next organizes her funeral.The title refers to Mosley's lifelong acceptance of paradox within a Christian setting. His meeting with a charismatic Anglican minister proves essential in setting Mosley on a path to editing a monthly called Prism and to come to grips with his extramarital loves: 'the proper working-out of difficult fate or chance does not seem to favour persons who keep to rules so much as those who trust and are ready to take off and fly.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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