Signed Edition Sweepstakes
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Benjamin Parzybok: IMG A Brief History of Video Games Played by Mayors, Presidents, and Emperors



Brandon Bartlett, the fictional mayor of Portland in my novel Sherwood Nation, is addicted to playing video games. In a city he's all but lost... Continue »
  1. $11.20 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    Sherwood Nation

    Benjamin Parzybok 9781618730862

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse American Studies- Economy

More copies of this ISBN

Other titles in the BK Currents series:

The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition (Bk Currents)

by

The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition (Bk Currents) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Defenders of globalization, free markets, and free trade insist there's no alternative to mega-stores like Wal-Mart — Michael Shuman begs to differ. In ""The Small-Mart Revolution, Shuman makes a compelling case for his alternative business model, one in which communities reap the benefits of ""going local"" in four key spending categories: goods, services, energy, and finance. He argues that despite the endless media coverage of multinational conglomerates, local businesses give more to charity, adapt more easily to rising labor and environmental standards, and produce more wealth for a community. They also spend more locally, thereby increasing community income and creating wealth and jobs. ""The Small-Mart Revolution presents a visionary yet practical roadmap for everyone concerned with mitigating the worst of globalization.

Review:

"Shuman begins his book about the 'local-first' movement by describing his annual trip to Wal-Mart to purchase a sturdy yet inexpensive pair of sneakers; he concludes it with a visit to his physical therapist, who tells him those same sneakers have exacerbated his chronic back pain. These two anecdotes provide context for Shuman's thesis: locally owned businesses are more beneficial to their communities than massive chains like Wal-Mart. The author (Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in a Global Age) outlines strategies that small and home-based businesses-and, by extension, consumers, investors and policymakers-can follow to compete against the world's largest companies; his strategies hinge on going local, though some ideas are more credible than others (readers are advised to shop at locally owned businesses and do business with local banks, but to forego credit cards, as 'nearly all credit card processing is nonlocal'). Shuman writes in a surprisingly lively and occasionally self-deprecating style uncommon to business texts, and his research is backed with hundreds of source notes. Though Shuman has his moments of naïve idealism, his 'don't get mad, get even' ideology will resonate with forward-thinking consumers and small business owners." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

American business consultant Shuman explains the devastation giant multinational corporation wreak on local economies and societies, the alternative of local ownership and import substitution, and the competitive advantage of being small. Then he suggests how consumers, investors, entrepreneurs, policymakers, community builders, and even globalizers can help. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Defenders of globalization, free markets, and free trade insist there's no alternative to mega-stores like Wal-Mart. Shuman begs to differ. In this work, the author makes a compelling case for an alternative business model, one in which communities reap the benefits of ""going local"" in four key spending categories.

Synopsis:

Offers an alternative model to the dominant view of economic development, a model that liberates and fosters the natural capacities of local businesses to grow and prosper. This book shows readers how easy and beneficial it is to "go local" in their four key spending categories: goods, services, energy and finance.

Synopsis:

Outlines a range of practical strategies for fighting globalization through profit- and community-minded small business practices, addressing the needs of four key spending categories that communities can meet to create local resources and job opportunities.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781576753866
Author:
Shuman, Michael H
Publisher:
Berrett-Koehler Publishers
Foreword:
McKibben, Bill
Author:
Shuman, Michael H.
Subject:
Small Business
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Economic Conditions
Subject:
Economics - Theory
Subject:
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Small Business
Subject:
Industries - General
Subject:
Small Business - General
Subject:
Small business -- United States.
Subject:
Globalization - Economic aspects
Subject:
Economics - General
Subject:
CourseSmart Subject Description
Subject:
BUSINESS, SMALL BUSINESS, SUCCESS
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Print PDF
Series:
BK Currents (Paperback)
Publication Date:
20060631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
285
Dimensions:
9.28x6.48x1.08 in. 1.34 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Big-Box Swindle: The True Cost of... Used Trade Paper $2.95
  2. Practical Politics: Five Principles... Used Trade Paper $9.95
  3. Streets of Hope: The Fall and Rise... Used Trade Paper $10.95
  4. The Travels of A T-Shirt in the... Used Trade Paper $5.95
  5. Transcend and Transform: An... Used Trade Paper $18.50
  6. One Hundred Years of Solitude Used Mass Market $4.50

Related Subjects

Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Writing
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Economics » US Economy

The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition (Bk Currents) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 285 pages Berrett-Koehler Publishers - English 9781576753866 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Shuman begins his book about the 'local-first' movement by describing his annual trip to Wal-Mart to purchase a sturdy yet inexpensive pair of sneakers; he concludes it with a visit to his physical therapist, who tells him those same sneakers have exacerbated his chronic back pain. These two anecdotes provide context for Shuman's thesis: locally owned businesses are more beneficial to their communities than massive chains like Wal-Mart. The author (Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in a Global Age) outlines strategies that small and home-based businesses-and, by extension, consumers, investors and policymakers-can follow to compete against the world's largest companies; his strategies hinge on going local, though some ideas are more credible than others (readers are advised to shop at locally owned businesses and do business with local banks, but to forego credit cards, as 'nearly all credit card processing is nonlocal'). Shuman writes in a surprisingly lively and occasionally self-deprecating style uncommon to business texts, and his research is backed with hundreds of source notes. Though Shuman has his moments of naïve idealism, his 'don't get mad, get even' ideology will resonate with forward-thinking consumers and small business owners." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
Defenders of globalization, free markets, and free trade insist there's no alternative to mega-stores like Wal-Mart. Shuman begs to differ. In this work, the author makes a compelling case for an alternative business model, one in which communities reap the benefits of ""going local"" in four key spending categories.
"Synopsis" by , Offers an alternative model to the dominant view of economic development, a model that liberates and fosters the natural capacities of local businesses to grow and prosper. This book shows readers how easy and beneficial it is to "go local" in their four key spending categories: goods, services, energy and finance.
"Synopsis" by , Outlines a range of practical strategies for fighting globalization through profit- and community-minded small business practices, addressing the needs of four key spending categories that communities can meet to create local resources and job opportunities.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.