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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

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Other titles in the Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies series:

African American Religion and the Civil Rights Movement in Arkansas (Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies)

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African American Religion and the Civil Rights Movement in Arkansas (Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

What role did religion play in sparking the call for civil rights? Was the African American church a motivating force or a calming eddy?

The conventional view among scholars of the period is that religion as a source for social activism was marginal, conservative, or pacifying.

Not so, argues Johnny E. Williams. Focusing on the state of Arkansas as typical in the role of ecclesiastical activism, his book argues that black religion from the period of slavery through the era of segregation provided theological resources that motivated and sustained preachers and parishioners battling racial oppression.

Drawing on interviews, speeches, case studies, literature, sociological surveys, and other sources, Williams persuasively defines the most ardent of civil rights activists in the state as products of church culture.

Both religious beliefs and the African American church itself were essential in motivating blacks to act individually and collectively to confront their oppressors in Arkansas and throughout the South. Williams explains how the ideology of the black church roused disparate individuals into a community and how the church established a base for many diverse participants in the civil rights movement.

He shows how church life and ecumenical education helped to sustain the protest of people with few resources and little permanent power. Williams argues that the church helped galvanize political action by bringing people together and creating social bonds even when societal conditions made action difficult and often dangerous. The church supplied its members with meanings, beliefs, relationships, and practices that served as resources to create a religious protest message of hope.

Johnny E. Williams is an associate professor of sociology at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. His work has been published in Sociological Forum and Sociological Spectrum.

Synopsis:

Civil Rights — Religious History

What role did religion play in sparking the call for civil rights? Was the African American church a motivating force or a calming eddy?

The conventional view among scholars of the period is that religion as a source for social activism was marginal, conservative, or pacifying.

Not so, argues Johnny E. Williams. Focusing on the state of Arkansas as typical in the role of ecclesiastical activism, his book argues that black religion from the period of slavery through the era of segregation provided theological resources that motivated and sustained preachers and parishioners battling racial oppression.

Drawing on interviews, speeches, case studies, literature, sociological surveys, and other sources, Williams persuasively defines the most ardent of civil rights activists in the state as products of church culture.

Both religious beliefs and the African American church itself were essential in motivating blacks to act individually and collectively to confront their oppressors in Arkansas and throughout the South. Williams explains how the ideology of the black church roused disparate individuals into a community and how the church established a base for many diverse participants in the civil rights movement.

He shows how church life and ecumenical education helped to sustain the protest of people with few resources and little permanent power. Williams argues that the church helped galvanize political action by bringing people together and creating social bonds even when societal conditions made action difficult and often dangerous. The church supplied its members with meanings, beliefs, relationships, and practices that served as resources to create a religious protest message of hope.

Johnny E. Williams is an associate professor of sociology at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. His work has been published in Sociological Forum and Sociological Spectrum.

Synopsis:

A history of how African American churches produced political firebrands in a call for civil rights and justice

Product Details

ISBN:
9781578065455
Author:
Williams, Johnny E.
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
Location:
Jackson
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century/60s
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
Sociology of Religion
Subject:
Minority Studies - Race Relations
Subject:
Arkansas
Subject:
Religion and politics
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
Civil rights movements
Subject:
African American churches
Subject:
African American civil rights workers
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
Religion, Politics & State
Subject:
Arkansas Church history.
Subject:
African Americans - Civil rights - Arkansas -
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Series:
Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies
Series Volume:
107-528
Publication Date:
20030731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Pages:
177
Dimensions:
9.20x6.54x.84 in. 1.02 lbs.

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
Religion » Western Religions » Social and Political Issues
Religion » Western Religions » Theology

African American Religion and the Civil Rights Movement in Arkansas (Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies) New Hardcover
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Product details 177 pages University Press of Mississippi - English 9781578065455 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Civil Rights — Religious History

What role did religion play in sparking the call for civil rights? Was the African American church a motivating force or a calming eddy?

The conventional view among scholars of the period is that religion as a source for social activism was marginal, conservative, or pacifying.

Not so, argues Johnny E. Williams. Focusing on the state of Arkansas as typical in the role of ecclesiastical activism, his book argues that black religion from the period of slavery through the era of segregation provided theological resources that motivated and sustained preachers and parishioners battling racial oppression.

Drawing on interviews, speeches, case studies, literature, sociological surveys, and other sources, Williams persuasively defines the most ardent of civil rights activists in the state as products of church culture.

Both religious beliefs and the African American church itself were essential in motivating blacks to act individually and collectively to confront their oppressors in Arkansas and throughout the South. Williams explains how the ideology of the black church roused disparate individuals into a community and how the church established a base for many diverse participants in the civil rights movement.

He shows how church life and ecumenical education helped to sustain the protest of people with few resources and little permanent power. Williams argues that the church helped galvanize political action by bringing people together and creating social bonds even when societal conditions made action difficult and often dangerous. The church supplied its members with meanings, beliefs, relationships, and practices that served as resources to create a religious protest message of hope.

Johnny E. Williams is an associate professor of sociology at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. His work has been published in Sociological Forum and Sociological Spectrum.

"Synopsis" by , A history of how African American churches produced political firebrands in a call for civil rights and justice
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