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Sun Climbs Slow (09 Edition)

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Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

"Toward a Just World is an insightful and thoughtful history. The first half of the twentieth century and the heroic efforts of those who sought international justice during that time will be much better understood and appreciated thanks to this fascinating book."—Robert F. Drinan, Georgetown University

A century ago, there was no such thing as international justice, and until recently, the idea of permanent international courts and formal war crimes tribunals would have been almost unthinkable. Yet now we depend on institutions such as these to air and punish crimes against humanity, as we have seen in the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the appearance of Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic before the Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

Toward a Just World tells the remarkable story of the long struggle to craft the concept of international justice that we have today. Dorothy V. Jones focuses on the first half of the twentieth century, the pivotal years in which justice took on expanded meaning in conjunction with ideas like world peace, human rights, and international law. Fashioning both political and legal history into a compelling narrative, Jones recovers little-known events from undeserved obscurity and helps us see with new eyes the pivotal ones that we think we know. Jones also covers many of the milestones in the history of diplomacy, from the Treaty of Versailles and the creation of the League of Nations to the Nuremberg war crimes tribunal and the making of the United Nations.

As newspapers continue to fill their front pages with stories about how to administer justice to al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein, Toward a Just World will serve as a timely reminder of how the twentieth century achieved one of its most enduring triumphs: giving justice an international meaning.

Book News Annotation:

This work reports on the politics of the International Criminal Court--established in 2002 for the prosecution of crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression--and the refusal of the United States to join the court. The author places the Court within the long history of international attempts to find redress for war crimes and reports on interviews with officials of the US government and of the International Criminal Court, activists pushing for the US to join the court, and other interested parties. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The improbable, yet true, story of the only court in the world that holds war criminals accountable for their actions, the International Criminal Court.

Synopsis:

In this groundbreaking investigation, Erna Paris explores the history of global justice, the politics behind America's opposition to the creation of a permanent international criminal court, and the implications for the world at large.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent tribunal of its kind. The mandate of the ICC is to challenge criminal impunity on the part of national leaders and to promote accountability in world affairs at the highest level. Independent and transnational, its indictments cannot be vetoed in the Security Council.

On March 11, 2003, when the new court was inaugurated in a moving ceremony, attended by over half of the countries in the world, one country was conspicuously missing from the celebrations. The government of the United States had made it clear that the International Criminal Court was not consistent with American goals and values.

Synopsis:

“Paris’s ability to convey the human dimension of international criminal justice is what makes this book special.”—The Globe and Mail

“In The Sun Climbs Slow Erna Paris describes, movingly and convincingly, the dawn of a new age of international law. There could be no better guide to the emerging world in which no guilty person, however powerful, can escape responsibility for acts of barbarism. Obligatory reading for the forward-looking.”—John Polanyi, Nobel Laureate

In this groundbreaking investigation, Erna Paris explores the history of global justice, the politics behind America’s opposition to the creation of a permanent international criminal court, and the implications for the world at large.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent tribunal of its kind. The mandate of the ICC is to challenge criminal impunity on the part of national leaders and to promote accountability in world affairs at the highest level. Independent and transnational, its indictments cannot be vetoed in the Security Council.

On March 11, 2003, when the new court was inaugurated in a moving ceremony, attended by over half of the countries in the world, one country was conspicuously missing from the celebrations. The government of the United States had made it clear that the International Criminal Court was not consistent with American goals and values.

Erna Paris is the winner of ten national and international writing awards, including the Canada-U.S. White Award for journalism, a gold medal from the National Magazine Awards Foundation, and four Media Club of Canada awards for feature writing and radio documentary. She is the author of six acclaimed books of literary nonfiction.

About the Author

Canadian Erna Paris is one of the leading writers in the world on issues of world history and social justice. Winner of many awards for her writing, she lives in Toronto, Canada.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Prologue

Part One: Conditions of Struggle

1. The Bright Chain of Reason

2. The Faithful Company

3. A Contest of Concepts

4. Invisible Barriers

Part Two: Weapons of Peace

5. Virtues, Old and New

6. The Transforming Years

7. The Fruits of Defiance

8. An Era Unknown

Part Three: Questions of Law

9. A Limited Reach

10. Symbolic Interventions

11. Morality in Thrall

12. The Puzzle of Evil

13. A Conservative Compass

14. Sovereignty's Hard Shell

Part Four: The Long Road Home

15. A Grotian Moment

16. A Home for the Heart

Notes

A Bibliographic Note on Theories of Justice

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781583228791
Author:
Paris, Erna
Publisher:
Seven Stories Press
Author:
Jones, Dorothy V.
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
World - General
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
International offenses
Subject:
International criminal court
Subject:
Criminal Law - General
Subject:
Courts - General
Subject:
International
Subject:
Law-Legal Guides and Reference
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20090531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
286
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.9 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights

Sun Climbs Slow (09 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.00 In Stock
Product details 286 pages Seven Stories Press - English 9781583228791 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The improbable, yet true, story of the only court in the world that holds war criminals accountable for their actions, the International Criminal Court.
"Synopsis" by , In this groundbreaking investigation, Erna Paris explores the history of global justice, the politics behind America's opposition to the creation of a permanent international criminal court, and the implications for the world at large.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent tribunal of its kind. The mandate of the ICC is to challenge criminal impunity on the part of national leaders and to promote accountability in world affairs at the highest level. Independent and transnational, its indictments cannot be vetoed in the Security Council.

On March 11, 2003, when the new court was inaugurated in a moving ceremony, attended by over half of the countries in the world, one country was conspicuously missing from the celebrations. The government of the United States had made it clear that the International Criminal Court was not consistent with American goals and values.

"Synopsis" by ,

“Paris’s ability to convey the human dimension of international criminal justice is what makes this book special.”—The Globe and Mail

“In The Sun Climbs Slow Erna Paris describes, movingly and convincingly, the dawn of a new age of international law. There could be no better guide to the emerging world in which no guilty person, however powerful, can escape responsibility for acts of barbarism. Obligatory reading for the forward-looking.”—John Polanyi, Nobel Laureate

In this groundbreaking investigation, Erna Paris explores the history of global justice, the politics behind America’s opposition to the creation of a permanent international criminal court, and the implications for the world at large.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent tribunal of its kind. The mandate of the ICC is to challenge criminal impunity on the part of national leaders and to promote accountability in world affairs at the highest level. Independent and transnational, its indictments cannot be vetoed in the Security Council.

On March 11, 2003, when the new court was inaugurated in a moving ceremony, attended by over half of the countries in the world, one country was conspicuously missing from the celebrations. The government of the United States had made it clear that the International Criminal Court was not consistent with American goals and values.

Erna Paris is the winner of ten national and international writing awards, including the Canada-U.S. White Award for journalism, a gold medal from the National Magazine Awards Foundation, and four Media Club of Canada awards for feature writing and radio documentary. She is the author of six acclaimed books of literary nonfiction.

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