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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

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1 Burnside International Studies- Human Rights

The Sun Climbs Slow: The International Criminal Court and the Search for Justice

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The Sun Climbs Slow: The International Criminal Court and the Search for Justice Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Paris’s ability to convey the human dimension of international criminal justice is what makes this book special.”—The Globe and Mail

“In The Sun Climbs Slow Erna Paris describes, movingly and convincingly, the dawn of a new age of international law. There could be no better guide to the emerging world in which no guilty person, however powerful, can escape responsibility for acts of barbarism. Obligatory reading for the forward-looking.”—John Polanyi, Nobel Laureate

In this groundbreaking investigation, Erna Paris explores the history of global justice, the politics behind America’s opposition to the creation of a permanent international criminal court, and the implications for the world at large.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent tribunal of its kind. The mandate of the ICC is to challenge criminal impunity on the part of national leaders and to promote accountability in world affairs at the highest level. Independent and transnational, its indictments cannot be vetoed in the Security Council.

On March 11, 2003, when the new court was inaugurated in a moving ceremony, attended by over half of the countries in the world, one country was conspicuously missing from the celebrations. The government of the United States had made it clear that the International Criminal Court was not consistent with American goals and values.

Erna Paris is the winner of ten national and international writing awards, including the Canada-U.S. White Award for journalism, a gold medal from the National Magazine Awards Foundation, and four Media Club of Canada awards for feature writing and radio documentary. She is the author of six acclaimed books of literary nonfiction.

Book News Annotation:

This work reports on the politics of the International Criminal Court--established in 2002 for the prosecution of crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression--and the refusal of the United States to join the court. The author places the Court within the long history of international attempts to find redress for war crimes and reports on interviews with officials of the US government and of the International Criminal Court, activists pushing for the US to join the court, and other interested parties. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The improbable, yet true, story of the only court in the world that holds war criminals accountable for their actions, the International Criminal Court.

Synopsis:

In this groundbreaking investigation, Erna Paris explores the history of global justice, the politics behind America's opposition to the creation of a permanent international criminal court, and the implications for the world at large.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent tribunal of its kind. The mandate of the ICC is to challenge criminal impunity on the part of national leaders and to promote accountability in world affairs at the highest level. Independent and transnational, its indictments cannot be vetoed in the Security Council.

On March 11, 2003, when the new court was inaugurated in a moving ceremony, attended by over half of the countries in the world, one country was conspicuously missing from the celebrations. The government of the United States had made it clear that the International Criminal Court was not consistent with American goals and values.

About the Author

Canadian Erna Paris is one of the leading writers in the world on issues of world history and social justice. Winner of many awards for her writing, she lives in Toronto, Canada.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781583228791
Author:
Paris, Erna
Publisher:
Seven Stories Press
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
World - General
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
International offenses
Subject:
International criminal court
Subject:
Criminal Law - General
Subject:
Courts - General
Subject:
International
Subject:
Law-Legal Guides and Reference
Copyright:
Edition Description:
2000 Edition
Publication Date:
20090531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
8.1 x 5.3 x 1.1 in 12.5 oz

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights

The Sun Climbs Slow: The International Criminal Court and the Search for Justice Used Trade Paper
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Product details 400 pages Seven Stories Press - English 9781583228791 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The improbable, yet true, story of the only court in the world that holds war criminals accountable for their actions, the International Criminal Court.
"Synopsis" by , In this groundbreaking investigation, Erna Paris explores the history of global justice, the politics behind America's opposition to the creation of a permanent international criminal court, and the implications for the world at large.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent tribunal of its kind. The mandate of the ICC is to challenge criminal impunity on the part of national leaders and to promote accountability in world affairs at the highest level. Independent and transnational, its indictments cannot be vetoed in the Security Council.

On March 11, 2003, when the new court was inaugurated in a moving ceremony, attended by over half of the countries in the world, one country was conspicuously missing from the celebrations. The government of the United States had made it clear that the International Criminal Court was not consistent with American goals and values.

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