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The Man Who Lost His Head (New York Review Children's Collection)

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The Man Who Lost His Head (New York Review Children's Collection) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Its bad news when you wake up in the morning and find youve lost your head, especially if its an especially agreeable and handsome head, but there you go, such things happen. In any case, the man who loses his head in The Man Who Lost His Head isnt about to grin (that is, if he could grin) and bear it. No, hell make himself a new one, and starting with a pumpkin and moving on to a parsnip and finally picking up a block of wood, he sets about getting it just right. Still, for all his efforts, it somehow isnt right. It isnt the head he had before. It turns out that only a brash bold boy can save the man who lost his head from losing it altogether.

Claire Huchet Bishops charming parable is illustrated by the great Robert McCloskey, whose books for children include One Morning in Maine, Blueberries for Sal, and the Caldecott Medal–winning Make Way for Ducklings.

Review:

"Out of print for more than 25 years, Bishop and McCloskey's unusual story about — well, the title says it all — is back. Awakening sans his head, the man at the center of the tale tries to remember where he left it ('It is very hard once you have lost your head'), then ventures forth to try to find it, substituting a pumpkin, a parsnip, and finally a wooden facsimile in the meantime (helpful, yes; undeniably unsettling, too). The solution is as madcap as the rest of the story, which was originally published in 1942, but the prose and Caldecott winner McCloskey's deliciously crisp artwork are evergreen. Ages 4 — 8." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

When a man discovers he has lost his head he tries several substitutes, but none is satisfactory.

Synopsis:

Its bad news when you wake up in the morning and find youve lost your head, especially if its an especially agreeable and handsome head, but there you go, such things happen. In any case, the man who loses his head in The Man Who Lost His Head isnt about to grin (that is, if he could grin) and bear it. No, hell make himself a new one, and starting with a pumpkin and moving on to a parsnip and finally picking up a block of wood, he sets about getting it just right. Still, for all his efforts, it somehow isnt right. It isnt the head he had before. It turns out that only a brash bold boy can save the man who lost his head from losing it altogether.

Claire Huchet Bishops charming parable is illustrated by the great Robert McCloskey, whose books for children include One Morning in Maine, Blueberries for Sal, and the Caldecott Medal-winning Make Way for Ducklings.

About the Author

Claire Huchet Bishop (ca. 1899-1993) was a librarian, storyteller, critic, and writer. She grew up in Le Havre, France, and attended the Sorbonne for a time before founding Frances first library for children, LHeure Joyeuse. Her childrens books grew out of the popular stories she told both at LHeure Joyeuse and at the New York Public Library, where she worked after marrying the pianist Frank Bishop and settling in the United States. Among the seventeen works of fiction she wrote for children are The Five Chinese Brothers (1938), Twenty and Ten (1952), and the Newbery Honor books Pancakes-Paris (1947) and All Alone (1953). Bishop also wrote several biographies for children and nonfiction works for adults, and served as childrens book editor at Commonweal during the 1930s. Active during the Second World War in the cause of European Jews, she devoted herself after the war to fostering better understanding between Jews and Christians, writing How Catholics Look at Jews (1974) and encouraging the Vaticans recognition of the State of Israel.

Robert McCloskey (1914-2003) was born in Ohio and moved east to study art in Boston and New York. He was awarded a prestigious Rome Prize, but World War II made it impossible for him to go to Rome. Renowned as a draftsman, McCloskey provided illustrations for a variety of authors and also wrote and illustrated eight books of his own, including Blueberries for Sal (1948), One Morning in Maine (1952), and the Caldecott Award-winning stories Make Way for Ducklings (1941) and Time of Wonder (1958). McCloskeys last book, Burt Dow: Deep-Water Man, came out in 1963. In 2003, he died on the Maine island where he had lived with his family since the 1940s.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590173329
Author:
Bishop, Claire Huche
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Illustrator:
McCloskey, Robert
Author:
McCloskey, Robert
Author:
Bishop, Claire Huchet
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
Head
Subject:
Social Issues - Lost & Found
Subject:
Children s humor
Copyright:
Series:
New York Review Children's Collection
Publication Date:
20091131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from P up to 3
Language:
English
Illustrations:
BandW ILLUSTRATIONS
Pages:
64
Dimensions:
7.08x9.38x.45 in. .69 lbs.
Children's Book Type:
Picture / Wordless
Age Level:
04-08

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Humor
Children's » Picture Books » A to Z
Children's » Picture Books » General

The Man Who Lost His Head (New York Review Children's Collection) Used Hardcover
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$10.50 In Stock
Product details 64 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590173329 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Out of print for more than 25 years, Bishop and McCloskey's unusual story about — well, the title says it all — is back. Awakening sans his head, the man at the center of the tale tries to remember where he left it ('It is very hard once you have lost your head'), then ventures forth to try to find it, substituting a pumpkin, a parsnip, and finally a wooden facsimile in the meantime (helpful, yes; undeniably unsettling, too). The solution is as madcap as the rest of the story, which was originally published in 1942, but the prose and Caldecott winner McCloskey's deliciously crisp artwork are evergreen. Ages 4 — 8." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , When a man discovers he has lost his head he tries several substitutes, but none is satisfactory.
"Synopsis" by , Its bad news when you wake up in the morning and find youve lost your head, especially if its an especially agreeable and handsome head, but there you go, such things happen. In any case, the man who loses his head in The Man Who Lost His Head isnt about to grin (that is, if he could grin) and bear it. No, hell make himself a new one, and starting with a pumpkin and moving on to a parsnip and finally picking up a block of wood, he sets about getting it just right. Still, for all his efforts, it somehow isnt right. It isnt the head he had before. It turns out that only a brash bold boy can save the man who lost his head from losing it altogether.

Claire Huchet Bishops charming parable is illustrated by the great Robert McCloskey, whose books for children include One Morning in Maine, Blueberries for Sal, and the Caldecott Medal-winning Make Way for Ducklings.

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