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1 Beaverton US History- 1800 to 1945

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The Stammering Century (New York Review Books Classics)

by

The Stammering Century (New York Review Books Classics) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Gilbert Seldes, the author of The Stammering Century, writes:

    This book is not a record of the major events in Ameri­can history during 

    the nineteenth century. It is concerned with minor movements, with the 

    cults and manias of that period. Its personages are fanatics, and radicals, 

    and mountebanks. Its intention is to connect these secondary movements 

    and figures with the primary forces of the century, and to supply a 

    background in American history for the Prohibitionists and the Pente­costalists; 

    the diet-faddists and the dealers in mail-order Personality; the play censors 

    and the Fundamen­talists; the free-lovers and eugenists; the cranks and 

    possibly the saints. Sects, cults, manias, movements, fads, religious 

    excitements, and the relation of each of these to the others and to the 

    orderly progress of America are the subject.

The subject is of course as timely at the beginning of the twenty-first century as when the book first appeared in 1928. Seldes’s fascinated and often sympathetic accounts of dreamers, rogues, frauds, sectarians, madmen, and geniuses from Jonathan Edwards to the messianic murderer Matthias have established The Stammering Century not only as a lasting contribution to American history but as a classic in its own right.

Synopsis:

 Gilbert Seldes’s own introduction to The Stammering Century nicely illustrates the range of interest and verve of expression that make it such a fascinating and enduring work of history. Seldes writes:

 

This book is not a record of the major events in American history during the nineteenth century. It is concerned with minor movements, with the cults and manias of that period. Its personages are fanatics, and radicals, and mountebanks. Its intention is to connect these secondary movements and figures with the primary forces of the century, and to supply a background in American history for the cults and manias of our own time: The Prohibitionists and the Pentecostalists; the diet-faddists and the dealers in mail-order Personality; the play censors and the Fundamentalists; the free-lovers and eugenists; the cranks and possibly the saints. Sects, cults, manias, movements, fads, religious excitements, and the relation of each of these to the others and to the orderly progress of America are the subject.

 

Which is a subject, we can safely say, that is as timely today as it was when Seldes wrote in 1928. But Seldes’s book is evergreen not just because our own century is still a stammering one. The book lives above all because, whether talking about a great figure like Jonathan Edwards or the celibate sect of Rappites or the messianic murderer Robert Matthews (a.k.a. Matthias), The Stammering Century is a model of exposition and a straight-out delight to read.

 [CE1]COMP: set this paragraph as extract

About the Author

Gilbert Seldes (1893–1970) was an American journalist, writer, and critic, the younger brother of the investigative journalist and media critic George Seldes. In the 1920s Seldes became the drama critic for The Dial and the New York correspondent for T. S. Eliot’s The Criterion. Later he made films, adapted plays for Broadway, wrote radio scripts, and became the first director of television for CBS News and the founding dean of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. His many books of cultural criticism and social analysis include The Seven Lively Arts (1924), The Years of the Locust (1932), The Movies Come from America (1937), and The Great Audience (1950).

Greil Marcus is the author of The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice, Lipstick Traces, and other books; with Werner Sollors he is the editor of A New Literary History of America. In recent years he has taught at the University of California at Berkeley, Princeton University, the New School University, and the University of Minnesota. He was born in San Francisco and lives in Berkeley.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590175804
Author:
Seldes, Gilbert
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Author:
Marcus, Greil
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20121131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
452
Dimensions:
7.98 x 5.14 x 0.99 in 1.02 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to 1945
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to Civil War
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » General
Reference » Science Reference » Technology

The Stammering Century (New York Review Books Classics) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 452 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590175804 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,  Gilbert Seldes’s own introduction to The Stammering Century nicely illustrates the range of interest and verve of expression that make it such a fascinating and enduring work of history. Seldes writes:

 

This book is not a record of the major events in American history during the nineteenth century. It is concerned with minor movements, with the cults and manias of that period. Its personages are fanatics, and radicals, and mountebanks. Its intention is to connect these secondary movements and figures with the primary forces of the century, and to supply a background in American history for the cults and manias of our own time: The Prohibitionists and the Pentecostalists; the diet-faddists and the dealers in mail-order Personality; the play censors and the Fundamentalists; the free-lovers and eugenists; the cranks and possibly the saints. Sects, cults, manias, movements, fads, religious excitements, and the relation of each of these to the others and to the orderly progress of America are the subject.

 

Which is a subject, we can safely say, that is as timely today as it was when Seldes wrote in 1928. But Seldes’s book is evergreen not just because our own century is still a stammering one. The book lives above all because, whether talking about a great figure like Jonathan Edwards or the celibate sect of Rappites or the messianic murderer Robert Matthews (a.k.a. Matthias), The Stammering Century is a model of exposition and a straight-out delight to read.

 [CE1]COMP: set this paragraph as extract

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