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Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



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Last Words from Montmartre (New York Review Books)

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Last Words from Montmartre (New York Review Books) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Qiu Miaojin (1969–1995) was a Taiwanese novelist. Her unapologetically lesbian sensibility has had a profound and lasting influence on queer literature in Taiwan. She worked in Taiwan before moving in 1994 to Paris, where she pursued graduate studies in clinical psychology and feminism at the University of Paris VIII. A year later she committed suicide.

 

Ari Larissa Heinrich is Associate Professor of Literature at University of California, San Diego, and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Sydney in Chinese studies.

Review:

"The reception of this short novel, which is considered a high point in Taiwanese LGBT fiction, will unavoidably be colored by Qiu's suicide in 1995, at age 26 (the book was written just before her death and posthumously published in Taiwanese). Her memorable dedication reads, 'For dead little Bunny and Myself, soon dead.' As Heinrich, the translator, explains in the afterword, the book's spiraling, plotless structure mirrors Qiu's increasingly intense last days. Written in the form of letters, the novel vacillates between romantic ecstasy and despair, while a coherent story slowly emerges. As the unnamed narrator pursues graduate studies in France, she grows increasingly alienated from her lovers and family still living in Taiwan. She feels adrift and alone without the love of her life, Xu, and without Bunny, the pet rabbit they cared for together, and she seeks relief from her overwhelming pain: 'I long to lie down quietly by the banks of a blue lake and die.' Qiu's voice, both colloquial and metaphysical, enchants even as she writes from the familiar perspective of a spurned lover. It would be wrong to interpret the book's — or, for that matter, the author's — ultimate surrender to death as a rejection of the richness of life; rather, like Goethe's young Werther, this 'last testament' (an alternative translation of the title) affirms the power of literature. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

US

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590177259
Author:
Miaojin, Qiu
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Author:
Heinrich, Ari Larissa
Author:
Heinrich, Larissa Ari
Author:
Miaojin, Qiu
Author:
Miaojin, Qui
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20140631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
7.97 x 4.99 x 0.53 in 0.44 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Biographical
Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » Gay Fiction
Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » Lesbian Fiction

Last Words from Montmartre (New York Review Books) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 176 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590177259 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The reception of this short novel, which is considered a high point in Taiwanese LGBT fiction, will unavoidably be colored by Qiu's suicide in 1995, at age 26 (the book was written just before her death and posthumously published in Taiwanese). Her memorable dedication reads, 'For dead little Bunny and Myself, soon dead.' As Heinrich, the translator, explains in the afterword, the book's spiraling, plotless structure mirrors Qiu's increasingly intense last days. Written in the form of letters, the novel vacillates between romantic ecstasy and despair, while a coherent story slowly emerges. As the unnamed narrator pursues graduate studies in France, she grows increasingly alienated from her lovers and family still living in Taiwan. She feels adrift and alone without the love of her life, Xu, and without Bunny, the pet rabbit they cared for together, and she seeks relief from her overwhelming pain: 'I long to lie down quietly by the banks of a blue lake and die.' Qiu's voice, both colloquial and metaphysical, enchants even as she writes from the familiar perspective of a spurned lover. It would be wrong to interpret the book's — or, for that matter, the author's — ultimate surrender to death as a rejection of the richness of life; rather, like Goethe's young Werther, this 'last testament' (an alternative translation of the title) affirms the power of literature. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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