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The Best Buddhist Writing 2004

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The Best Buddhist Writing 2004 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Best Buddhist Writing 2004 is a thoughtful, inspiring, and often humorous collection of writings from a Buddhist perspective. Selected by the editors of the Shambhala Sun, North America's leading Buddhist-inspired magazine, The Best Buddhist Writing 2004 features selections from the Dalai Lama; Thich Nhat Hanh; Pema Chodron; Natalie Goldberg, author of Writing Down the Bones; novelist and journalist Pico Iyer; Huston Smith, America's most respected writer on comparative religion; MacArthur Award winner Charles Johnson; Random House editor-in-chief Dan Meneker; and many others. This collection offers an entertaining mix of writing styles and re?ects on a wide range of issues from a Buddhist point of view: thoughtful meditations on nature and the environment, the edgy experiences of hip twenty-somethings, wise reflections on illness and end-of-life issues, light-hearted looks at the spiritual life, and deep insights into the truths of Buddhist philosophy and practice. The collection includes: The Dalai Lama on how to find satisfaction in your job Barbara Gates on love, home, and spirit Phillip Moffitt on the difference between goals and intentions Is it hip to be enlightened? Noah Levine and Brad Warner on bohemian Buddhism Thich Nhat Hanh's techniques for creating peace Sakyong Mipham on making your mind into an ally It's your karma, man: Dan Meneker's humorous look at fashionable Buddhist terms

Review:

"Most of the usual Buddhist teachers — the Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh, Pema Chdrn et al. — are rounded up in this anthology of contemporary American Buddhist writers and writings. The subjects range widely: explanations of Buddhist teachings, a travel essay, musings anchored in ordinary family life. What stretches the book beyond the usual and enhances its variety is the inclusion of lesser-known voices, such as the American Theravadan monk Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano, novelist Charles Johnson and Oprah Winfrey — connected 'life coach' Martha Beck. Editor McLeod says the writings were chosen for depth of insight as well as writing quality, and both aspects vary. Longtime Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman's piece is a disappointingly simple paean to his teacher and associate the Dalai Lama, for example. But writer David Guy's essay on a Buddhist approach to stage fright is a fresh example of the everyday applications of Buddhist wisdom. Although anthologies often serve as gateways, this contains so many selections that it's not the best choice for beginners. Greater selectivity or longer introductory notes might help make key writers more accessible and more distinct from one another. Anthologies can generate quarrels about who's in and who's left out, yet this one provides a valuable cross-section of American Buddhist writers and merits continuing annually. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"This Buddhist compilation reflects variety: in subject matter, tone and schools of Buddhism within America. The usual suspects are here-the Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh-but the authors also include Buddhist prison inmate Scott Darnell and well-known writer Rick Bass, not a Buddhist but a frequent contributor to Buddhist publications. Some essays are teachings, while others are more or less quirky autobiographical accounts. This collection has a good deal of mingling of the personal and the spiritual. The late mind-body researcher Francisco J. Varela writes at an unusually compelling intersection of science, spirituality and autobiography, reflecting on his own liver transplant. Recognition of mortality and transience is at the heart of Buddhism, so it's no surprise that a number of essays turn on the experience of profound loss. Writing teacher Natalie Goldberg's deeply felt essay on her teacher's death also rated inclusion in this year's spiritual writing anthology, edited by Philip Zaleski. Buddhist writing remains a bit in its own universe, however varied the subjects. Still, the benchmark set by this anthology will only be set higher as Buddhism grows in its latest cultural home in the West." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

The collection includes:
- The Dalai Lama on how to find satisfaction in your job
- Barbara Gates on love, home, and spirit
- Phillip Moffitt on the difference between goals and intentions
- Is it hip to be enlightened? Noah Levine and Brad Warner on bohemian Buddhism
- Thich Nhat Hanh's techniques for creating peace
- Sakyong Mipham on making your mind into an ally
- It's your karma, man: Dan Meneker's humorous look at fashionable Buddhist terms

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590301890
Editor:
McLeod, Melvin
Editor:
The Editors of the Shambhala Sun
Publisher:
Shambhala Publications
Subject:
Buddhism - General
Copyright:
Series:
Best Buddhist Writing
Publication Date:
October 2004
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.38x5.52x1.01 in. .98 lbs.

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Religion » Eastern Religions » Buddhism » General

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Product details 384 pages Shambhala Publications - English 9781590301890 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Most of the usual Buddhist teachers — the Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh, Pema Chdrn et al. — are rounded up in this anthology of contemporary American Buddhist writers and writings. The subjects range widely: explanations of Buddhist teachings, a travel essay, musings anchored in ordinary family life. What stretches the book beyond the usual and enhances its variety is the inclusion of lesser-known voices, such as the American Theravadan monk Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano, novelist Charles Johnson and Oprah Winfrey — connected 'life coach' Martha Beck. Editor McLeod says the writings were chosen for depth of insight as well as writing quality, and both aspects vary. Longtime Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman's piece is a disappointingly simple paean to his teacher and associate the Dalai Lama, for example. But writer David Guy's essay on a Buddhist approach to stage fright is a fresh example of the everyday applications of Buddhist wisdom. Although anthologies often serve as gateways, this contains so many selections that it's not the best choice for beginners. Greater selectivity or longer introductory notes might help make key writers more accessible and more distinct from one another. Anthologies can generate quarrels about who's in and who's left out, yet this one provides a valuable cross-section of American Buddhist writers and merits continuing annually. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This Buddhist compilation reflects variety: in subject matter, tone and schools of Buddhism within America. The usual suspects are here-the Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh-but the authors also include Buddhist prison inmate Scott Darnell and well-known writer Rick Bass, not a Buddhist but a frequent contributor to Buddhist publications. Some essays are teachings, while others are more or less quirky autobiographical accounts. This collection has a good deal of mingling of the personal and the spiritual. The late mind-body researcher Francisco J. Varela writes at an unusually compelling intersection of science, spirituality and autobiography, reflecting on his own liver transplant. Recognition of mortality and transience is at the heart of Buddhism, so it's no surprise that a number of essays turn on the experience of profound loss. Writing teacher Natalie Goldberg's deeply felt essay on her teacher's death also rated inclusion in this year's spiritual writing anthology, edited by Philip Zaleski. Buddhist writing remains a bit in its own universe, however varied the subjects. Still, the benchmark set by this anthology will only be set higher as Buddhism grows in its latest cultural home in the West." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , The collection includes:
- The Dalai Lama on how to find satisfaction in your job
- Barbara Gates on love, home, and spirit
- Phillip Moffitt on the difference between goals and intentions
- Is it hip to be enlightened? Noah Levine and Brad Warner on bohemian Buddhism
- Thich Nhat Hanh's techniques for creating peace
- Sakyong Mipham on making your mind into an ally
- It's your karma, man: Dan Meneker's humorous look at fashionable Buddhist terms
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