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25 Remote Warehouse Computer Languages- Java

.NET Development for Java Programmers

by

.NET Development for Java Programmers Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Java developers have adapted to a world in which everything is an object, resources are reclaimed by a garbage collector, and multiple inheritance is replaced by interfaces. All of these things have prepared developers to thrive in Microsoft's new .NET environment using C#.

Despite similarities between Java and C#, complex differences still lurk. This book will walk you through both language and library differences, to help you develop enterprise applications requiring mastery. You will then be able to build applications that communicate with databases and include network components, web pages, and many other features.

Ordinarily, Java developers rely on Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) to provide these libraries, and C# developers rely on the .NET Framework. At first glance, there seems little similarity between the two, but author Paul Gibbons shows how a Java developer's J2EE skills transfer smoothly when tackling the .NET Framework.

Early chapters highlight C#'s differences from Java, and discuss differences between the .NET CLR and JVM. Subsequent chapters cover various technologies in which J2EE development translates into .NET enterprise development. These middle chapters also explain .NET technologies that Java developers can begin using immediately. The final chapter examines migration of existing Java applications to C#, and the available tools and techniques. By the end of .NET Development for Java Programmers, a professional Java developer will be able to tackle a real software project in .NET, using C#.

Synopsis:

After a quick chapter on making the language transition between Java and C#, Gibbons turns to showing the developer how to move a J2EE application to .NET. There are detailed and serious discussions of how to port Servlet, JSP, or EJB-based applications to ASP.NET.

Synopsis:

Although making the transition from the Java language to the C# language is almost trivial and would not justify a book in Apress' opinion, making the transition at the Enterprise level is a totally different story. In .NET, developers have ASP .NET, COM+, and the whole Microsoft .NET Enterprise server line. With J2EE, developers have JSP, Servlets, Enterprise JavaBeans, and application servers, such as BEA's WebLogic. How to move from the Java-based solution to the .NET-based solution is a subject that can only grow in popularity because of the cost savings possible on the Windows/Intel platform! After a very quick chapter on making the language transition between Java and C#, Paul Gibbons immediately turns to showing the developer how to move a J2EE application to .NET. There are detailed and serious discussions of how to port Servlet, JSP, or EJB-based applications to ASP .NET. Filled with lots of insights on the tradeoffs and benefits of moving to .NET, as well as containing the necessary information to make a successful transition, Gibbons' book is the first to cover an area that can only grow in importance.

Table of Contents

Introduction.- The C# Language.- An Introduction to the .NET Platform.- WinForms.- ASP .NET.- ADO .NET.- Multithreading.- Networking.- XML.- Components.- Packaging and Installation.- MSMQ.- Active Directory.- NT Services.- Getting Outside the Box.- Migration.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590590386
Foreword:
Cornell, Gary
Author:
Cornell, Gary
Author:
Gibbons, Paul
Publisher:
Apress
Subject:
Programming Languages - General
Subject:
Programming - General
Subject:
Object-oriented programming (computer science
Subject:
Java (Computer program language)
Subject:
Programming Languages - Java
Subject:
Computer Languages-Java
Series:
Net Developer Series
Publication Date:
20020731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
386
Dimensions:
9.20x7.44x1.07 in. 1.92 lbs.

Related Subjects

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.NET Development for Java Programmers New Trade Paper
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Product details 386 pages Apress - English 9781590590386 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , After a quick chapter on making the language transition between Java and C#, Gibbons turns to showing the developer how to move a J2EE application to .NET. There are detailed and serious discussions of how to port Servlet, JSP, or EJB-based applications to ASP.NET.
"Synopsis" by , Although making the transition from the Java language to the C# language is almost trivial and would not justify a book in Apress' opinion, making the transition at the Enterprise level is a totally different story. In .NET, developers have ASP .NET, COM+, and the whole Microsoft .NET Enterprise server line. With J2EE, developers have JSP, Servlets, Enterprise JavaBeans, and application servers, such as BEA's WebLogic. How to move from the Java-based solution to the .NET-based solution is a subject that can only grow in popularity because of the cost savings possible on the Windows/Intel platform! After a very quick chapter on making the language transition between Java and C#, Paul Gibbons immediately turns to showing the developer how to move a J2EE application to .NET. There are detailed and serious discussions of how to port Servlet, JSP, or EJB-based applications to ASP .NET. Filled with lots of insights on the tradeoffs and benefits of moving to .NET, as well as containing the necessary information to make a successful transition, Gibbons' book is the first to cover an area that can only grow in importance.
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