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1 Local Warehouse African American Studies- Civil Rights Movement

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Other titles in the Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies series:

Count Them One by One: Black Mississippians Fighting for the Right to Vote (Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies)

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Count Them One by One: Black Mississippians Fighting for the Right to Vote (Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies) Cover

ISBN13: 9781604737899
ISBN10: 1604737891
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Appalachian legend describes a mysterious, multiethnic population of exotic, dark-skinned rogues called Melungeons who rejected the outside world and lived in the remote, rugged mountains in the farthest corner of northeast Tennessee. The allegedly unknown origins of these Melungeons are part of what drove this legend and generated myriad exotic origin theories. Though nobody self-identified as Melungeon before the 1960s, by the 1990s and#8220;Melungeonnessand#8221; had become a full-fledged cultural phenomenon, resulting in a zealous online community and annual meetings where self-identified Melungeons gathered to discuss shared genealogy and history. Although today Melungeons are commonly identified as the descendants of underclass whites, freed African Americans, and Native Americans, this ethnic identity is still largely a social construction based on local tradition, myth, and media.

In Becoming Melungeon, Melissa Schrift examines the ways in which the Melungeon ethnic identity has been socially constructed over time by various regional and national media, plays, and other forms of popular culture. Schrift explores how the social construction of this legend evolved into a fervent movement of a self-identified ethnicity in the 1990s. This illuminating and insightful work examines the shifting social constructions of race, ethnicity, and identity both in the local context of the Melungeons and more broadly in an attempt to understand the formation of ethnic groups and identity in the modern world.

Synopsis:

Forrest County, Mississippi, became a focal point of the civil rights movement when, in 1961, the United States Justice Department filed a lawsuit against its voting registrar Theron Lynd. While thirty percent of the county's residents were black, only twelve black persons were on its voting rolls. United States v. Lynd was the first trial that resulted in the conviction of a southern registrar for contempt of court. The case served as a model for other challenges to voter discrimination in the South, and was an important influence in shaping the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Count Them One by One is a comprehensive account of the groundbreaking case written by one of the Justice Department's trial attorneys. Gordon A. Martin, Jr., then a newly-minted lawyer, traveled to Hattiesburg from Washington to help shape the federal case against Lynd. He met with and prepared the government's sixteen black witnesses who had been refused registration, found white witnesses, and was one of the lawyers during the trial.

Decades later, Martin returned to Mississippi and interviewed the still-living witnesses, their children, and friends. Martin intertwines these current reflections with commentary about the case itself. The result is an impassioned, cogent fusion of reportage, oral history, and memoir about a trial that fundamentally reshaped liberty and the South.

Synopsis:

The personal account of a community and a lawyer united to battle one of the most recalcitrant bastions of resistance to civil rights

About the Author

Gordon A. Martin, Jr., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, is a retired trial judge, and an adjunct professor of law at New England Law School (Boston). His work has been published in the New England Law Review, Commonweal, the Jackson Clarion-Ledger, the Boston Globe, the New England Journal on Criminal and Civil Confinement, and other periodicals.

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Just Lil, July 1, 2010 (view all comments by Just Lil)
This is the story of brave African-Americans who risked their livelihoods and their lives attempting to register to vote in Forrest County, Mississippi, and then testifying in court in 1962 about how they were prevented from registering. One was murdered by the White Knights of the Klan. Others experienced persecution and various personal challenges. The case of United States v. Theron Lynd, brought by the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice against the county registrar was the first real step toward passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Without that statute and the massive increase in African-American voter registration it caused, there would today be no Obama Administration. This compelling narrative is written by one of the Justice Department attorneys who handled the case.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781604737899
Subtitle:
Making an Ethnic Identity in the Appalachian South
Author:
Martin, Gordon A
Memoir by:
Martin, Gordon A.
Memoir:
Martin, Gordon A.
Author:
ordon A., Jr. Martin
Author:
Gordon A., Jr. Martin
Author:
Martin, Gordon A.
Author:
Schrift, Melissa
Author:
G .
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
Civil Rights
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
Election law
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
Civil Rights; Memoir; Mississippi
Subject:
Memoir
Subject:
Mississippi
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
Law-Civil Liberties and Human Rights
Subject:
Mississippi History.
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Edition Description:
Cloth
Series:
Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies
Publication Date:
20130501
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 appendixes
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » Civil Rights Movement
History and Social Science » Law » Civil Liberties and Human Rights
History and Social Science » Law » Election Law
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Count Them One by One: Black Mississippians Fighting for the Right to Vote (Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies) Used Hardcover
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$12.50 In Stock
Product details 232 pages University Press of Mississippi - English 9781604737899 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Forrest County, Mississippi, became a focal point of the civil rights movement when, in 1961, the United States Justice Department filed a lawsuit against its voting registrar Theron Lynd. While thirty percent of the county's residents were black, only twelve black persons were on its voting rolls. United States v. Lynd was the first trial that resulted in the conviction of a southern registrar for contempt of court. The case served as a model for other challenges to voter discrimination in the South, and was an important influence in shaping the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Count Them One by One is a comprehensive account of the groundbreaking case written by one of the Justice Department's trial attorneys. Gordon A. Martin, Jr., then a newly-minted lawyer, traveled to Hattiesburg from Washington to help shape the federal case against Lynd. He met with and prepared the government's sixteen black witnesses who had been refused registration, found white witnesses, and was one of the lawyers during the trial.

Decades later, Martin returned to Mississippi and interviewed the still-living witnesses, their children, and friends. Martin intertwines these current reflections with commentary about the case itself. The result is an impassioned, cogent fusion of reportage, oral history, and memoir about a trial that fundamentally reshaped liberty and the South.

"Synopsis" by , The personal account of a community and a lawyer united to battle one of the most recalcitrant bastions of resistance to civil rights
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