The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | Yesterday, 10:00am

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
  1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$40.17
List price: $59.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Military- General

More copies of this ISBN

Whips to Walls: Naval Discipline from Flogging to Progressive Era Reform at Portsmouth Prison

by

Whips to Walls: Naval Discipline from Flogging to Progressive Era Reform at Portsmouth Prison Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

During World War I the U.S. Navy conducted what many penal scholars consider the most ambitious experiment in the history of Progressive Era prison reform at the Portsmouth Naval Prison in New Hampshire. Cell doors remained open, prisoners governed themselves, and thousands of rehabilitated inmates returned to the fleet. This humanitarian experiment stood in stark contrast to the tradition of flogging that dominated naval discipline until 1850. The Navy's journey between these two extremes included the development of a much-needed naval prison system.

In 1917, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt chose the most celebrated prison reformer of his era, Thomas Mott Osborne, to assume command of the Portsmouth prison. Osborne's reforms at Portsmouth were well received until Vice Adm. William S. Sims and others became convinced that too many troublemakers were being returned to the fleet. Under mounting pressure, Roosevelt personally led an on-site investigation of conditions at the Portsmouth prison, which included charges of gross mismanagement and rampant homosexual activity. Although exonerated by Roosevelt's team, Osborne resigned from the Navy shortly after the inquiry. Osborne's reform initiatives were quickly reversed as the Navy returned to a harsher punishment system.

Synopsis:

The abolishment of flogging in 1850 started the U.S. Navy on a quest for a prison system that culminated with the opening of Portsmouth Naval Prison in 1908. During World War I, that prison became the center of the Navy's attempt to reform what many considered outdated means of punishment. Driven by Progressive Era ideals and led by Thomas Mott Osborne, cell doors remained opened, inmates governed themselves, and thousands of rehabilitated prisoners were returned to the fleet. Championed by Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Roosevelt, Osborne's reforms proceeded positively until Vice Adm. William. Sims and others became convinced that too many troublemakers were being returned to the fleet. In response, FDR led an on-site investigation of conditions at Portsmouth prison, which included charges of gross mismanagement and rampant homosexual activity. Although exonerated, Osborne resigned and initiatives were quickly reversed as the Navy returned to a harsher system.

Synopsis:

During World War I, the United States Navy conducted at the Portsmouth, NH Naval Prison what many penal scholars consider the most ambitious experiment in the history of progressive prison reform. Cell doors remained opened, prisoners governed themselves and thousands of rehabilitated prisoners were returned to the fleet. This humanitarian experiment at Portsmouth prison stood in stark contrast to the inhumane flogging of prisoners that had dominated naval discipline until 1850. The Navy's journey between these two extremes in naval discipline included the development of a much needed naval prison system.

About the Author

Capt. Rodney K. Watterson USN (Ret.) is the author of 32 in '44: Building the Portsmouth Submarine Fleet in World War II. He lives in Hampton, NH.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781612514451
Author:
Rodney K. Watterson.
Publisher:
US Naval Institute Press
Author:
Watterson, Rodney K.
Subject:
Military - Naval
Subject:
Military-Naval History
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20140331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
41, 20 b/w photos, 21 illustrations
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » General
History and Social Science » Military » Naval History
History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General

Whips to Walls: Naval Discipline from Flogging to Progressive Era Reform at Portsmouth Prison New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$40.17 In Stock
Product details 272 pages US Naval Institute Press - English 9781612514451 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The abolishment of flogging in 1850 started the U.S. Navy on a quest for a prison system that culminated with the opening of Portsmouth Naval Prison in 1908. During World War I, that prison became the center of the Navy's attempt to reform what many considered outdated means of punishment. Driven by Progressive Era ideals and led by Thomas Mott Osborne, cell doors remained opened, inmates governed themselves, and thousands of rehabilitated prisoners were returned to the fleet. Championed by Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Roosevelt, Osborne's reforms proceeded positively until Vice Adm. William. Sims and others became convinced that too many troublemakers were being returned to the fleet. In response, FDR led an on-site investigation of conditions at Portsmouth prison, which included charges of gross mismanagement and rampant homosexual activity. Although exonerated, Osborne resigned and initiatives were quickly reversed as the Navy returned to a harsher system.
"Synopsis" by , During World War I, the United States Navy conducted at the Portsmouth, NH Naval Prison what many penal scholars consider the most ambitious experiment in the history of progressive prison reform. Cell doors remained opened, prisoners governed themselves and thousands of rehabilitated prisoners were returned to the fleet. This humanitarian experiment at Portsmouth prison stood in stark contrast to the inhumane flogging of prisoners that had dominated naval discipline until 1850. The Navy's journey between these two extremes in naval discipline included the development of a much needed naval prison system.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.