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    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

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"Harrison (50 Popular Beliefs That People Think Are True) is a confirmed skeptic, and he wants everyone to join him. He laments that too many of us accept information without examining it critically, and quoting Carl Sagan, he reminds readers that 'extraordinary claims demand extraordinary evidence.' Therefore, if one sees Bigfoot, it's important to get a DNA sample along with photos. Harrison states that each person needs to question his or her own perceptions, as well as those of others. His section on panaceas is very useful, as he explains the meaning of terms such as 'natural,' explaining why these must be deeply examined. In his comments on specific beliefs, such as alien abductions and miracles, Harrison shows some exasperation but provides useful tools for skeptics. On reading the chapter on the care of the brain, this reader wanted more proof of his assertions — which may be a sign of the efficacy of Harrison's general arguments. Each chapter ends with a reading list, a potential source for further answers. Harrison demonstrates the need for critical analysis in a world of conflicting stories and glib 'facts.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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9781616148089

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Product details pages - English 9781616148089 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Harrison (50 Popular Beliefs That People Think Are True) is a confirmed skeptic, and he wants everyone to join him. He laments that too many of us accept information without examining it critically, and quoting Carl Sagan, he reminds readers that 'extraordinary claims demand extraordinary evidence.' Therefore, if one sees Bigfoot, it's important to get a DNA sample along with photos. Harrison states that each person needs to question his or her own perceptions, as well as those of others. His section on panaceas is very useful, as he explains the meaning of terms such as 'natural,' explaining why these must be deeply examined. In his comments on specific beliefs, such as alien abductions and miracles, Harrison shows some exasperation but provides useful tools for skeptics. On reading the chapter on the care of the brain, this reader wanted more proof of his assertions — which may be a sign of the efficacy of Harrison's general arguments. Each chapter ends with a reading list, a potential source for further answers. Harrison demonstrates the need for critical analysis in a world of conflicting stories and glib 'facts.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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