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Jeff Wall: Picture for Women (Afterall)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Jeff Wall's Picture for Women (1979) marks the transition of photography as an art form from the printed page to the gallery wall. Before this, photographsand#38;mdash;from the orthodox photographic work of Walker Evans to the Conceptual photography of Dan Grahamand#38;mdash;seemed intended for the page even when hung in a gallery. In Picture for Women, a woman looks outward, as if at the viewer; a camera occupies the center of the photograph; the photographer stands on the right. Modeled on Manet's famous painting Un bar aux Folies-Bergère, in which a barmaid seems to look directly out of the painting, observed by a man on the right, Picture for Women establishes its own art historical genealogy, claiming its rightful position within the canon. Wall's photograph is an ambitious attempt to relate the artistic and spectatorial demands of the late 1970s to a modernist pictorial art that had been too hastily rejected by Conceptualism. In this illustrated study, David Campany offers an account of Wall's move from a Conceptual approach to a reengagement with the idea of a singular (as opposed to serial) picture. He shows that Wall's decision to present his work as a large-scale back-lit transparency, together with his commitment to a singular image, amounted to a radical departure. He contrasts Wall's idea of the photograph as a tableau or andquot;picture,andquot; inherited from the history of painting, with the works of the andquot;Pictures Generationandquot;and#38;mdash;including Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, and Jack Goldsteinand#38;mdash;and argues that Picture for Women is inseparable from the modern fate of the picture in generalandlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;Examining a work that marked the emergence of photography as an art made for the gallery wall instead of the printed page. andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Jeff Wall's Picture for Women (1979) marks the transition of photography as an art form from the printed page to the gallery wall. Before this, photographs—from the orthodox photographic work of Walker Evans to the Conceptual photography of Dan Graham—seemed intended for the page even when hung in a gallery. In Picture for Women, a woman looks outward, as if at the viewer; a camera occupies the center of the photograph; the photographer stands on the right. Modeled on Manet's famous painting Un bar aux Folies-Bergère, in which a barmaid seems to look directly out of the painting, observed by a man on the right, Picture for Women establishes its own art historical genealogy, claiming its rightful position within the canon. Wall's photograph is an ambitious attempt to relate the artistic and spectatorial demands of the late 1970s to a modernist pictorial art that had been too hastily rejected by Conceptualism. In this illustrated study, David Campany offers an account of Wall's move from a Conceptual approach to a reengagement with the idea of a singular (as opposed to serial) picture. He shows that Wall's decision to present his work as a large-scale back-lit transparency, together with his commitment to a singular image, amounted to a radical departure. He contrasts Wall's idea of the photograph as a tableau or "picture," inherited from the history of painting, with the works of the "Pictures Generation"—including Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, and Jack Goldstein—and argues that Picture for Women is inseparable from the modern fate of the picture in general

Synopsis:

Examining a work that marked the emergence of photography as an art made for the gallery wall instead of the printed page.

About the Author

David Campany is an artist and writer and Reader in Photography at the University of Westminster, London. He is the author of Art and Photography.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781846380716
Subtitle:
Picture for Women
Author:
Campany, David
Publisher:
MIT
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Individual Artist
Subject:
Photography-Photographers
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
AFTERALL Jeff Wall
Publication Date:
20110513
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
32 color illus.
Pages:
118
Dimensions:
8.5 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Photography » Annuals
Arts and Entertainment » Photography » Photographers
Arts and Entertainment » Photography » Theory and Criticism

Jeff Wall: Picture for Women (Afterall) New Trade Paper
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Product details 118 pages Afterall Books - English 9781846380716 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;Examining a work that marked the emergence of photography as an art made for the gallery wall instead of the printed page. andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Jeff Wall's Picture for Women (1979) marks the transition of photography as an art form from the printed page to the gallery wall. Before this, photographs—from the orthodox photographic work of Walker Evans to the Conceptual photography of Dan Graham—seemed intended for the page even when hung in a gallery. In Picture for Women, a woman looks outward, as if at the viewer; a camera occupies the center of the photograph; the photographer stands on the right. Modeled on Manet's famous painting Un bar aux Folies-Bergère, in which a barmaid seems to look directly out of the painting, observed by a man on the right, Picture for Women establishes its own art historical genealogy, claiming its rightful position within the canon. Wall's photograph is an ambitious attempt to relate the artistic and spectatorial demands of the late 1970s to a modernist pictorial art that had been too hastily rejected by Conceptualism. In this illustrated study, David Campany offers an account of Wall's move from a Conceptual approach to a reengagement with the idea of a singular (as opposed to serial) picture. He shows that Wall's decision to present his work as a large-scale back-lit transparency, together with his commitment to a singular image, amounted to a radical departure. He contrasts Wall's idea of the photograph as a tableau or "picture," inherited from the history of painting, with the works of the "Pictures Generation"—including Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, and Jack Goldstein—and argues that Picture for Women is inseparable from the modern fate of the picture in general
"Synopsis" by , Examining a work that marked the emergence of photography as an art made for the gallery wall instead of the printed page.
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