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Brunel

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Isambard Kingdom Brunel was the outstanding entrepreneurial Victorian engineer. He helped construct the Thames Tunnel, build the Great Western Railway and its terminus, Paddington Station, but his boldest endeavours were three gigantic ships.

Synopsis:

Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-59) was the outstanding example of an entrepreneurial Victorian engineer, seen at his most memorable in front of the chains used to launch the Great Eastern. His father, the French-born engineer Marc Isambard Brunel (1769-1849), invented the tunnelling shield and with it constructed the world's first underwater tunnel, 366m long, under the Thames between Wapping and Rotherhithe; it is still in use as part of London's underground. The younger Brunel was appointed resident engineer of the project at the age of 19. In 1833, when he was 27, he became chief engineer to the Great Western railway, building the line from Paddington to Bristol. His design for the new Clifton suspension bridge and had been accepted in 1831. The boldest of his many endeavours were his three great ships, each the largest in the world when launched. The Great Western, a wooden paddle steamer, was the first steamship to be build specifically for the Atlantic; she made her inaugural crossing in 1838 in 15 days (the small Sirius had been by a whisker the first to steam across, reaching New York the previous day after a journey of 19 days). The iron-hulled Great Britain was launched in Bristol in 1843 and is now back there. The Great Eastern (1858) was a monster which almost literally killed Brunel. It was another half century before any ship exceeded her length of 211m or her displacement of 22,500 tons. She proved almost impossible to launch and then had an unsatisfactory career crossing the Atlantic (so much coal had to be carried that there was insufficient room for the intended 4000 passengers). She only came into her own when laying the Transatlantic telegraph cable in 1865. Brunelwas spared the pain of much of this saga; he suffered a stroke on board the ship just before her maiden voyage.

About the Author

Annabel Gillings produces Science and History programmes for BBC television, mostly of the Time series. She has also produced programmes for Horizon. She has written for various publications including Prospect magazine and the Economist.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781904950448
Author:
Gillings, Annabel
Publisher:
Haus Pub.
Subject:
Artists, Architects, Photographers
Subject:
Historical - British
Subject:
Scientists - General
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Biography-Artists Architects and Photographers
Subject:
General Biography
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Haus Publishing - Life & Times
Publication Date:
20060431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
182
Dimensions:
8 x 5 in

Related Subjects

» Biography » Artists, Architects, and Photographers
» Biography » Historical
» Biography » Science and Technology
» Engineering » Civil Engineering » General

Brunel New Trade Paper
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Product details 182 pages Haus Publishers Ltd. - English 9781904950448 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-59) was the outstanding example of an entrepreneurial Victorian engineer, seen at his most memorable in front of the chains used to launch the Great Eastern. His father, the French-born engineer Marc Isambard Brunel (1769-1849), invented the tunnelling shield and with it constructed the world's first underwater tunnel, 366m long, under the Thames between Wapping and Rotherhithe; it is still in use as part of London's underground. The younger Brunel was appointed resident engineer of the project at the age of 19. In 1833, when he was 27, he became chief engineer to the Great Western railway, building the line from Paddington to Bristol. His design for the new Clifton suspension bridge and had been accepted in 1831. The boldest of his many endeavours were his three great ships, each the largest in the world when launched. The Great Western, a wooden paddle steamer, was the first steamship to be build specifically for the Atlantic; she made her inaugural crossing in 1838 in 15 days (the small Sirius had been by a whisker the first to steam across, reaching New York the previous day after a journey of 19 days). The iron-hulled Great Britain was launched in Bristol in 1843 and is now back there. The Great Eastern (1858) was a monster which almost literally killed Brunel. It was another half century before any ship exceeded her length of 211m or her displacement of 22,500 tons. She proved almost impossible to launch and then had an unsatisfactory career crossing the Atlantic (so much coal had to be carried that there was insufficient room for the intended 4000 passengers). She only came into her own when laying the Transatlantic telegraph cable in 1865. Brunelwas spared the pain of much of this saga; he suffered a stroke on board the ship just before her maiden voyage.
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