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1 Hawthorne Poetry- A to Z

Other titles in the Fence Modern Poets series:

In the Laurels, Caught (Fence Modern Poets)

by

In the Laurels, Caught (Fence Modern Poets) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the Laurels, Caught is a collection of lighthearted, deep-rooted poems written around the Appalachian region of North Carolina in Madison County. An adventurous, intellectually restless native, Lee Ann Brown writes out of attachment but with the slant of a transplanted outsider. She investigates elements of local language, musicality, material culture, and landscape, using collage, found poetry, and oral history and anecdote.

A Daylily's blossom

only lasts one day

Binnorie O Binorie O

My grandmother showed me

how to have my say

O the glory O the glory

Now every time I see a faded drooping bud

I deadhead it like she did so the rest can live on

The story O the story

Lee Ann Brown is professor of English at St. John's University. Her book Polyverse won the New American Poetry Series Award. The Sleep That Changed Everything appeared in 2003. She is founding editor of the small press Tender Buttons.

Review:

"This book has practically everything: six epigraphs, four sections of poems — concrete, found, lyric, and prose, and even a list of items up for grabs at a garage sale — while across the bottoms of all the pages, in a script typeface, is one long 'RIVER CODEX,' which Brown, in her endnotes, tells us 'is designed to be read either forwards or backwards.' This book, part almanac, part linguistic scrapbook, 'struggle with the anti-essentialists who say we cannot identify Appalachia,' and seems to attempt to do for the contemporary South what Susan Howe's Singularities did for the colonial North. But here, while some readers may 'like to be preoccupied by all the fluttering,' others could become alienated, as the line between avant-garde and all-over-the-place can be a thin one. Meanwhile, Brown's tendency to reveal her own process and the literal sources of the book's language adds a self-consciousness to her experiments. 'I am sick with love for the poem,' she writes. 'In pulling the threads out what is lost// sometimes to unravel is a good thing/ but learn to interweave// variations on an old pattern/ but don't lose track of the old one/ so you can come back to its lovely form/ for another variation.' (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A major experimentalist digs up her rural roots in this portrait of flowery but never sweet dynamic regionalism.

About the Author

Lee Ann Brown is Associate Professor of English at St. John's University in New York City. A poet and filmmaker whose first book, Polyverse (Sun&Moon, 1999), won the New American Poetry Series Award. Her second book, The Sleep That Changed Everything, appeared in 2003 from Wesleyan. She is also the founder and editor of the small press Tender Buttons.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781934200643
Author:
Brown, Lee Ann
Publisher:
Fence Books
Subject:
Single Author / American
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Fence Modern Poets Series
Publication Date:
20130531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
88
Dimensions:
8 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

In the Laurels, Caught (Fence Modern Poets) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 88 pages Fence Books - English 9781934200643 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This book has practically everything: six epigraphs, four sections of poems — concrete, found, lyric, and prose, and even a list of items up for grabs at a garage sale — while across the bottoms of all the pages, in a script typeface, is one long 'RIVER CODEX,' which Brown, in her endnotes, tells us 'is designed to be read either forwards or backwards.' This book, part almanac, part linguistic scrapbook, 'struggle with the anti-essentialists who say we cannot identify Appalachia,' and seems to attempt to do for the contemporary South what Susan Howe's Singularities did for the colonial North. But here, while some readers may 'like to be preoccupied by all the fluttering,' others could become alienated, as the line between avant-garde and all-over-the-place can be a thin one. Meanwhile, Brown's tendency to reveal her own process and the literal sources of the book's language adds a self-consciousness to her experiments. 'I am sick with love for the poem,' she writes. 'In pulling the threads out what is lost// sometimes to unravel is a good thing/ but learn to interweave// variations on an old pattern/ but don't lose track of the old one/ so you can come back to its lovely form/ for another variation.' (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
A major experimentalist digs up her rural roots in this portrait of flowery but never sweet dynamic regionalism.
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