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6 Remote Warehouse Poetry- A to Z

A. Poulin, Jr. New Poets of America #35: The Stick Soldiers

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A. Poulin, Jr. New Poets of America #35: The Stick Soldiers Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"…thoughtful recollections, scary memories, articulate reflections, and the resolve of a man who has been there."—Publishers Weekly

At age nineteen, Hugh Martin withdrew from college when his National Guard unit was activated for a deployment to Iraq. After training at Fort Bragg, Martin spent 2004 in Iraq as the driver of his platoon sergeant's Humvee. He participated in hundreds of missions including raids, conducting foot patrols, clearing routes for IEDs, disposing of unexploded ordnance, and searching thousands of Iraqi vehicles. These poems recount his time in basic training, his preparation for Iraq, his experience withdrawing from school, and ultimately, the final journey to Iraq and back home to Ohio.

Hugh Martin holds an MFA from Arizona State University. He is a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.

Review:

"Martin served with the U.S. Army in Iraq between 2003 and 2005; his solid, sad verse debut chronicles that experience, along with the months before and the years after. Stateside training generates some of his strangest, harshest poems, including a prose anecdote that might describe a murder. Time back at home, in snowy Ohio, prompts alienated, ambivalent regret, comparable at best to Randall Jarrell's poems on World War II airmen and veterans. Yet the bulk of the book, and its reason for being, involve Martin's time in Iraq. Sand gets everywhere, IEDs could be anywhere, children are sources at once of pathos and danger, and camaraderie is all-important. 'We avoid trash, disturbed soil, animal carcasses./ We arrest men// who dig beside the road./ We hate the ground.' Some pages portray other soldiers, grim, friendly, naive: 'Smith, shirtless, curls forty-pound dumbbells,/ part of his plan for home:// a sex life.' Other sentences take on the scenes and the moments of combat: 'You aim. Your first shot./ But the truck slows. When you adjust, your foot slips,/ you fall below the edge, unable to see.' Now a Stegner Fellow at Stanford, Martin breaks little new ground in the craft of verse. What he offers instead — along with the very few other Iraq war poets (Brian Turner, for example) noticed so far — are thoughtful recollections, scary memories, articulate reflections, and the resolve of a man who has been there." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Iraq war veteran's Poulin Prize–winning debut poetry collection explores war, masculinity, and return to civilian life. Introduction by Cornelius Eady.

About the Author

Hugh Martin is a graduate of Muskingum University and completed his MFA at Arizona State in May, 2012. He served six years in the Army National Guard as an M1A1 Tanker and spent 11 months in Iraq. His poetry centers on the narratives that crossed his path as a soldier, with a goal "to make each section vivid and strong enough to give the reader a clear idea of what each soldier is like as a human being."

Martin's work has appeared in CONSEQUENCE Magazine, Mid-American Review, Nashville Review, and is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Third Coast, and the American Poetry Review. His chapbook, So, How Was the War? (Kent State UP, 2010) was published by the Wick Poetry Center, and was selected as part of the 7th Avenue Streetscape Series in downtown Phoenix, Arizona. In the summer of 2011 he taught introductory creative writing classes at the National University of Singapore. He will be a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University in the fall of 2012.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781938160066
Author:
Martin, Hugh
Publisher:
BOA Editions
Author:
Eady, Cornelius
Subject:
Single Author / American
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
New Poets of America
Publication Date:
20130431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
88
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

A. Poulin, Jr. New Poets of America #35: The Stick Soldiers New Trade Paper
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Product details 88 pages BOA Editions - English 9781938160066 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Martin served with the U.S. Army in Iraq between 2003 and 2005; his solid, sad verse debut chronicles that experience, along with the months before and the years after. Stateside training generates some of his strangest, harshest poems, including a prose anecdote that might describe a murder. Time back at home, in snowy Ohio, prompts alienated, ambivalent regret, comparable at best to Randall Jarrell's poems on World War II airmen and veterans. Yet the bulk of the book, and its reason for being, involve Martin's time in Iraq. Sand gets everywhere, IEDs could be anywhere, children are sources at once of pathos and danger, and camaraderie is all-important. 'We avoid trash, disturbed soil, animal carcasses./ We arrest men// who dig beside the road./ We hate the ground.' Some pages portray other soldiers, grim, friendly, naive: 'Smith, shirtless, curls forty-pound dumbbells,/ part of his plan for home:// a sex life.' Other sentences take on the scenes and the moments of combat: 'You aim. Your first shot./ But the truck slows. When you adjust, your foot slips,/ you fall below the edge, unable to see.' Now a Stegner Fellow at Stanford, Martin breaks little new ground in the craft of verse. What he offers instead — along with the very few other Iraq war poets (Brian Turner, for example) noticed so far — are thoughtful recollections, scary memories, articulate reflections, and the resolve of a man who has been there." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Iraq war veteran's Poulin Prize–winning debut poetry collection explores war, masculinity, and return to civilian life. Introduction by Cornelius Eady.
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