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How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One

by

How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Some appreciate fine art; others appreciate fine wines. Stanley Fish appreciates fine sentences. The New York Times columnist and world-class professor has long been an aficionado of language: "I am always on the lookout for sentences that take your breath away, for sentences that make you say, 'Isn't that something?' or 'What a sentence!'" Like a seasoned sportscaster, Fish marvels at the adeptness of finely crafted sentences and breaks them down into digestible morsels, giving readers an instant play-by-play.

In this entertaining and erudite gem, Fish offers both sentence craft and sentence pleasure, skills invaluable to any writer (or reader). His vibrant analysis takes us on a literary tour of great writers throughout history—from William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and Henry James to Martin Luther King Jr., Antonin Scalia, and Elmore Leonard. Indeed, How to Write a Sentence is both a spirited love letter to the written word and a key to understanding how great writing works; it is a book that will stand the test of time.

Synopsis:

"New York Times" columnist Fish presents an entertaining, erudite celebration of language and rhetoric drawing on a wide range of examples from Hobbes to Scalia to Elmore Leonard.

Table of Contents

Why sentences? — Why you won't find the answer in Strunk and White — It's not the thought that counts — What is a good sentence? — The subordinating style — The additive style — The satiric style : the return of content — First sentences — Last sentences — Sentences that are about themselves (aren't they all?).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780062006851
Subtitle:
And How to Read One
Publisher:
Harper
Author:
Fish, Stanley
Subject:
Books & Reading
Subject:
English language -- Sentences.
Subject:
English language -- Grammar.
Subject:
Rhetoric
Subject:
HUMANITI-DISPL214EndCap
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Subject:
Reference-Grammar and Style
Subject:
Reference/Writing
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20110125
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
165

Related Subjects

Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Reference » Grammar and Style
Reference » Rhetoric
Reference » Writing » General

How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One
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Product details 165 pages HarperCollins - English 9780062006851 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "New York Times" columnist Fish presents an entertaining, erudite celebration of language and rhetoric drawing on a wide range of examples from Hobbes to Scalia to Elmore Leonard.
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