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V. S. Pritchett: A Working Life

V. S. Pritchett: A Working Life Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"[Treglown's] refreshingly brisk book, which manages to compress Pritchett's story into fewer than 260 pages of text, is among the most intelligent and perceptive depictions of a writer's habits and routine, and of the economics of a literary profession, that I've read." Benjamin Schwarz, The Atlantic Monthly (read the entire Atlantic Monthly review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Long considered the English Chekhov, V. S. Pritchett was described by Eudora Welty as “one of the great pleasure-givers in our language.” Here is a true literary event: the first major biography of this extraordinary writer, who for most of a century ennobled the ordinary, and the affecting story of the two tumultuous marriages that fueled his art.

He would become universally known as V.S.P., but he began life as Victor — named for Queen Victoria — in 1900. His imagination was both an inheritance from and an inoculation against his unpredictable father: a charming spendthrift who went bankrupt in a variety of businesses. For Victor, writing ultimately became a way to turn the pain of his past into security.

As a reporter in the 1920s, Pritchett was posted to some of the trouble spots of Europe, including pre-Civil War Spain, but he preferred travel to politics, honing the acute perception of common people that he used to great effect in his fiction. His youthful marriage to a better-born aspiring actress was his first crisis, leaving him in sexual misery, comforted only by the “inner riot” of his imagination.

His affair with and marriage to Dorothy Roberts, in his mid-thirties, changed his life. Passionate and forceful, she became Pritchett’s support and secretary, helping him to develop his voice in short stories, novels, literary journalism, and memoirs. His work dramatized the world of his native lower middle class, showing how “every life is interesting.” Their union produced two children and a cache of stunning erotic letters, published in part here for the first time.

But as Pritchett’s international fame as an author and critic grew, so did the couple’s separations. Already a serious drinker, Dorothy became an alcoholic. Pritchett took an American mistress while in residence at Princeton, causing a painful and prolonged domestic crisis.

Illuminating the connections between events in his life and famous works such as his novel Mr. Beluncle, dramatizing the friendships Pritchett forged with other writers, particularly Gerald Brenan, and cogently analyzing the undeserved eclipse his reputation would suffer immediately after his death, Jeremy Treglown’s V. S. Pritchett is the complete story of a popular, influential, deceptively simple author, a man to whom, he once misleadingly claimed, “nothing continues to happen.”

Review:

"In his heyday, when his work was widely read on both sides of the Atlantic, V.S. Pritchett was considered 'the greatest writer-critic since Virginia Woolf' and 'incomparably the finest short-story writer of our time.' Writing with felicitous ease and psychological insight, Treglown (Roald Dahl), formerly editor of the Times Literary Supplement, assesses the circumstances attending Pritchett's prodigiously varied oeuvre — travel pieces, literary criticism, short stories, novels, essays, biographies and memoirs. Pritchett's previously unpublished correspondence and journals inform a biography finely attuned to his domestic and professional vicissitudes during a life that spanned most of the 20th century (he was born in 1900 and died in 1997). Here is fresh material about VSP's lower-middle-class origins, his charlatan father, his miserable two decades with his first wife, Evelyn, and his passionate marriage to Dorothy — a long-lasting union that was deeply troubled by her alcoholism and his affairs. To American readers who eagerly awaited Pritchett's work in the New Yorker, this biography will augment the respect he already enjoys. Even better, it may attract new readers to the work of a man who represented his century with unwavering energy and acuity. 16 pages of photos not seen by PW. Agent, Amanda Urban. FYI: This biography will be published in tandem with a new Modern Library edition of Essential Stories, edited by Treglown, and Mr. Beluncle, arguably Pritchett's best novel." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Long considered the English Chekhov, V. S. Pritchett was described by Eudora Welty as one of the great pleasure-givers in our language. Here is a true literary event: the first major biography of this extraordinary writer, who for most of a century ennobled the ordinary, and the affecting story of the two tumultuous marriages that fueled his art.

He would become universally known as V.S.P., but he began life as Victor-named for Queen Victoria-in 1900. His imagination was both an inheritance from and an inoculation against his unpredictable father: a charming spendthrift who went bankrupt in a variety of businesses. For Victor, writing ultimately became a way to turn the pain of his past into security.

As a reporter in the 1920s, Pritchett was posted to some of the trouble spots of Europe, including pre-Civil War Spain, but he preferred travel to politics, honing the acute perception of common people that he used to great effect in his fiction. His youthful marriage to a better-born aspiring actress was his first crisis, leaving him in sexual misery, comforted only by the inner riot of his imagination.

His affair with and marriage to Dorothy Roberts, in his mid-thirties, changed his life. Passionate and forceful, she became Pritchett's support and secretary, helping him to develop his voice in short stories, novels, literary journalism, and memoirs. His work dramatized the world of his native lower middle class, showing how every life is interesting. Their union produced two children and a cache of stunning erotic letters, published in part here for the first time.

But as Pritchett's international fame as an author and critic grew, so did the couple's separations.Already a serious drinker, Dorothy became an alcoholic. Pritchett took an American mistress while in residence at Princeton, causing a painful and prolonged domestic crisis.

Illuminating the connections between events in his life and famous works such as his novel Mr. Beluncle, dramatizing the friendships Pritchett forged with other writers, particularly Gerald Brenan, and cogently analyzing the undeserved eclipse his reputation would suffer immediately after his death, Jeremy Treglown's V. S. Pritchett is the complete story of a popular, influential, deceptively simple author, a man to whom, he once misleadingly claimed, nothing continues to happen.

About the Author

Jeremy Treglown is also the author of Roald Dahl: A Biography and Romancing: The Life and Work of Henry Green, which won the Dictionary of Literary Biography Award. Now a professor of English at the University of Warwick, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement from 1982 to 1990. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. He lives in London.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375508530
Publisher:
Random House
Subject:
Literary
Author:
Treglown, Jeremy
Subject:
Journalists
Subject:
Authors, English
Edition Description:
Us
Publication Date:
January 2005
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.34x6.52x1.26 in. 1.40 lbs.

Related Subjects


Biography » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

V. S. Pritchett: A Working Life
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 352 pages Random House - English 9780375508530 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In his heyday, when his work was widely read on both sides of the Atlantic, V.S. Pritchett was considered 'the greatest writer-critic since Virginia Woolf' and 'incomparably the finest short-story writer of our time.' Writing with felicitous ease and psychological insight, Treglown (Roald Dahl), formerly editor of the Times Literary Supplement, assesses the circumstances attending Pritchett's prodigiously varied oeuvre — travel pieces, literary criticism, short stories, novels, essays, biographies and memoirs. Pritchett's previously unpublished correspondence and journals inform a biography finely attuned to his domestic and professional vicissitudes during a life that spanned most of the 20th century (he was born in 1900 and died in 1997). Here is fresh material about VSP's lower-middle-class origins, his charlatan father, his miserable two decades with his first wife, Evelyn, and his passionate marriage to Dorothy — a long-lasting union that was deeply troubled by her alcoholism and his affairs. To American readers who eagerly awaited Pritchett's work in the New Yorker, this biography will augment the respect he already enjoys. Even better, it may attract new readers to the work of a man who represented his century with unwavering energy and acuity. 16 pages of photos not seen by PW. Agent, Amanda Urban. FYI: This biography will be published in tandem with a new Modern Library edition of Essential Stories, edited by Treglown, and Mr. Beluncle, arguably Pritchett's best novel." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[Treglown's] refreshingly brisk book, which manages to compress Pritchett's story into fewer than 260 pages of text, is among the most intelligent and perceptive depictions of a writer's habits and routine, and of the economics of a literary profession, that I've read." (read the entire Atlantic Monthly review)
"Synopsis" by , Long considered the English Chekhov, V. S. Pritchett was described by Eudora Welty as one of the great pleasure-givers in our language. Here is a true literary event: the first major biography of this extraordinary writer, who for most of a century ennobled the ordinary, and the affecting story of the two tumultuous marriages that fueled his art.

He would become universally known as V.S.P., but he began life as Victor-named for Queen Victoria-in 1900. His imagination was both an inheritance from and an inoculation against his unpredictable father: a charming spendthrift who went bankrupt in a variety of businesses. For Victor, writing ultimately became a way to turn the pain of his past into security.

As a reporter in the 1920s, Pritchett was posted to some of the trouble spots of Europe, including pre-Civil War Spain, but he preferred travel to politics, honing the acute perception of common people that he used to great effect in his fiction. His youthful marriage to a better-born aspiring actress was his first crisis, leaving him in sexual misery, comforted only by the inner riot of his imagination.

His affair with and marriage to Dorothy Roberts, in his mid-thirties, changed his life. Passionate and forceful, she became Pritchett's support and secretary, helping him to develop his voice in short stories, novels, literary journalism, and memoirs. His work dramatized the world of his native lower middle class, showing how every life is interesting. Their union produced two children and a cache of stunning erotic letters, published in part here for the first time.

But as Pritchett's international fame as an author and critic grew, so did the couple's separations.Already a serious drinker, Dorothy became an alcoholic. Pritchett took an American mistress while in residence at Princeton, causing a painful and prolonged domestic crisis.

Illuminating the connections between events in his life and famous works such as his novel Mr. Beluncle, dramatizing the friendships Pritchett forged with other writers, particularly Gerald Brenan, and cogently analyzing the undeserved eclipse his reputation would suffer immediately after his death, Jeremy Treglown's V. S. Pritchett is the complete story of a popular, influential, deceptively simple author, a man to whom, he once misleadingly claimed, nothing continues to happen.

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