It's Raining Books Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Brian Doyle: IMG The Rude Burl of Our Masks



One day when I was 12 years old and setting off on my newspaper route after school my mom said will you stop at the doctor's and pick up something... Continue »
  1. $13.27 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    Children and Other Wild Animals

    Brian Doyle 9780870717543

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

Starving to Death on $200 Million: The Short, Absurd Life of the Industry Standard

by

Starving to Death on $200 Million: The Short, Absurd Life of the Industry Standard Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Industry Standard sought to chronicle the world of Internet business, but instead became one of its spectacular failures — and its collapse turned out to be a funnier story than you'd expect.

It was not that long ago that The Industry Standard was an international publishing phenomenon. Founded in 1998 with the grandiose goal of being "the BusinessWeek of the Internet economy," it soared to unprecedented heights during the dot-com boom, with far-flung bureaus, a thriving conference business, and a seemingly endless supply of cash. In 2000 alone, The Standard published more than 7,000 ad pages, generating revenues of over $200 million — more than any other magazine in the history of America. Little did anyone imagine that the following August the entire organization would file for bankruptcy.

Starving to Death on $200 Million a Year is James Ledbetter's mock-heroic chronicle of the magazine that lived large and died young: the wild dreams, the sudden success, the wanton excesses, the fatal hemorrhage. From his vantage point as one of The Standard's top editors, he saw up close how it succumbed to the same gold-rush fever as the Internet businesses it was supposed to be chronicling, realizing too late that he had been infected as well.

As America continues to reckon with its post-nineties hangover, Ledbetter offers a sardonic look at a thriving business that died on the verge of taking on the world.

Review:

"[A] terrific inside account of the Internet boom....This mix of corporate history and memoir captures the story's economic and human sides, although at times it's hard for readers to keep track of the characters and events. Despite having a limited initial audience — how many people really want to read about a magazine that croaked not long after its second birthday? — it serves as a fantastic testament to a bygone era." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Ledbetter's chronicle of the ride read like a business thriller from start to finish." James J. Cramer, The Street.com

Review:

"Ledbetter's account of the backroom negotiations that attended the Standard's demise drags in places, but he is adept at capturing both the late-nineties atmosphere of irrational exuberance and the bitter, hung-over feeling that followed." The New Yorker

Review:

"A little long and occasionally repetitive, but a solid account nonetheless: a fine study of both the business of business journalism and the corrosive power of corporate politics." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"This is a story of a monumental media business failure, entertaining and instructive in equal parts." Netsurfer Digest

Book News Annotation:

The magazine The Industry Standard, founded with the goal of being the "Business Week of the Internet economy," suffered the same fate as many of the companies it covered, declaring bankruptcy a few years after its founding. Ledbetter, one of the magazine's editors, chronicles the rise and fall of the publishing enterprise. He details his beliefs about why the magazine failed and attempts to assign blame for its problems. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

This is Ledbetter's mock-heroic chronicle of the magazine that lived large and died young. From his vantage point as one of The Standard's top editors, he saw up close how it succumbed to the same gold-rush fever as the Internet businesses it was supposed to be chronicling, realizing too late that he had been infected as well.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [273]-280) and index.

About the Author

James Ledbetter was the European bureau chief of The Industry Standard, having previously run the magazine's New York bureau. A former media columnist for The Village Voice, he has also written for, among others, The New York Times, The Nation, The New Republic, The Washington Post, and GQ. He lives in London.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781586481292
Subtitle:
The Short, Absurd Life of the Industry Standard
Publisher:
Public Affairs Press (NY)
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Business
Subject:
History
Subject:
Infrastructure
Subject:
Mass Media - Magazines
Subject:
Business failures
Subject:
Internet industry
Subject:
Corporate & Business History - General
Subject:
E-Commerce - General
Subject:
Industry standard
Subject:
Media Studies - Print Media
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
GTR-516
Publication Date:
January 7, 2003
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.60x6.55x1.15 in. 1.35 lbs.

Related Subjects

Business » General
Business » History and Biographies
Business » Writing

Starving to Death on $200 Million: The Short, Absurd Life of the Industry Standard
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 288 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781586481292 Reviews:
"Review" by , "[A] terrific inside account of the Internet boom....This mix of corporate history and memoir captures the story's economic and human sides, although at times it's hard for readers to keep track of the characters and events. Despite having a limited initial audience — how many people really want to read about a magazine that croaked not long after its second birthday? — it serves as a fantastic testament to a bygone era."
"Review" by , "Ledbetter's chronicle of the ride read like a business thriller from start to finish."
"Review" by , "Ledbetter's account of the backroom negotiations that attended the Standard's demise drags in places, but he is adept at capturing both the late-nineties atmosphere of irrational exuberance and the bitter, hung-over feeling that followed."
"Review" by , "A little long and occasionally repetitive, but a solid account nonetheless: a fine study of both the business of business journalism and the corrosive power of corporate politics."
"Review" by , "This is a story of a monumental media business failure, entertaining and instructive in equal parts."
"Synopsis" by , This is Ledbetter's mock-heroic chronicle of the magazine that lived large and died young. From his vantage point as one of The Standard's top editors, he saw up close how it succumbed to the same gold-rush fever as the Internet businesses it was supposed to be chronicling, realizing too late that he had been infected as well.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. [273]-280) and index.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.