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10 Remote Warehouse Biography- Literary

William and Dorothy Wordsworth: 'All in Each Other'

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William and Dorothy Wordsworth: 'All in Each Other' Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

William Wordsworth's iconic relationship with his 'beloved Sister' spanned nearly fifty years. Separated after the death of their mother when Dorothy was six, and reunited as orphans after the death of their father, they became inseparable companions. This is the first literary biography to give each sibling the same level of detailed attention; with Dorothy's writings set fully alongside her brother's, we see her to be the poet's equal in a literary partnership of outstanding importance. But Newlyn shows that writing was just one element of their lifelong work to re-build their family and re-claim their communal identity; walking, talking, remembering, and grieving were just as important. This rich and holistic account celebrates the importance of mental and spiritual health, human relationships, and the environment.

Review:

"Oxford professor Newlyn (Reading Writing and Romanticism) investigates the lifelong 'creative collaboration' between the poet William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy. After the early death of their parents, Dorothy and William grew up almost entirely apart. But after reuniting on the cusp of adulthood, they lived together for their entire lives, with Dorothy joining William's household until the end. Best known today for her lyrical journals recording travels with her brother, Dorothy was central to William's creative process, to the extent that William called her one of 'the two Beings to whom my intellect is most indebted.' Newlyn argues for seeing much of Wordsworth's poetry as a kind of gift-exchange with his sister, asserting the therapeutic value of their creative community in overcoming early bereavement and poverty. Dorothy's prose and William's poetry were reparative, Newlyn claims, as the two cultivated shared memories, community, and an enduring bond with their environment. Along with close readings of their respective works, Newlyn provides useful contextual detours into theories of gift economy, 18th-century medicine and nostalgia, as well as themes in critical theory and eco-criticism. Though the book's level of detail is best suited to specialists, Newlyn offers a valuable corrective to existing Wordsworth criticism and a moving testimonial to the power of creativity and community. 8-page b&w plate section." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Lucy Newlyn was born in Uganda, grew up in Leeds, and read English at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. She is now Professor of English Language and Literature at Oxford University, and a Fellow of St Edmund Hall. She has published widely on English Romantic Literature, including three books with Oxford University Press, and The Cambridge Companion to Coleridge. Her book Reading Writing and Romanticism: The Anxiety of Reception(O.U.P, 2000) won the British Academy's Rose Mary Crawshay prize in 2001. More recently she has been working on the prose writings of Edward Thomas. Together with Guy Cuthbertson she edited Branch-Lines: Edward Thomas and Contemporary Poetry, as well as England and Wales, a volume in the ongoing OUP edition of Thomas's prose. Married with a daughter and two step-children, Lucy Newlyn lives in Oxford. Ginnel, her first collection of poetry, was published in 2005: she is currently working on her second.

Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter One: Homeless

Chapter Two: Windy Brow and Racedown

Chapter Three: Alfoxden

Chapter Four: Hamburg

Chapter Five: Goslar and Sockburn

Chapter Six: Homecoming

Chapter Seven: Dwelling

Chapter Eight: The Grasmere Journal

Chapter Nine: The Orchard at Town End

Chapter Ten: Scotland

Chapter Eleven: Grasmere and Coleorton

Chapter Twelve: The Lake District

Chapter Thirteen: The Continent

Chapter Fourteen: Wanderlust

Chapter Fifteen: Rydal

Chapter Sixteen: Home

Abbreviations

Bibliography

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199696390
Author:
Newlyn, Lucy
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature/English | British Literature | 19th C
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Publication Date:
20131231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
8-page plate section
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
6.1 x 9.3 x 0.7 in 1.669 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Biography » Literary
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

William and Dorothy Wordsworth: 'All in Each Other' New Hardcover
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$42.25 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199696390 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Oxford professor Newlyn (Reading Writing and Romanticism) investigates the lifelong 'creative collaboration' between the poet William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy. After the early death of their parents, Dorothy and William grew up almost entirely apart. But after reuniting on the cusp of adulthood, they lived together for their entire lives, with Dorothy joining William's household until the end. Best known today for her lyrical journals recording travels with her brother, Dorothy was central to William's creative process, to the extent that William called her one of 'the two Beings to whom my intellect is most indebted.' Newlyn argues for seeing much of Wordsworth's poetry as a kind of gift-exchange with his sister, asserting the therapeutic value of their creative community in overcoming early bereavement and poverty. Dorothy's prose and William's poetry were reparative, Newlyn claims, as the two cultivated shared memories, community, and an enduring bond with their environment. Along with close readings of their respective works, Newlyn provides useful contextual detours into theories of gift economy, 18th-century medicine and nostalgia, as well as themes in critical theory and eco-criticism. Though the book's level of detail is best suited to specialists, Newlyn offers a valuable corrective to existing Wordsworth criticism and a moving testimonial to the power of creativity and community. 8-page b&w plate section." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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