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This title in other editions

Inventing Wine: A New History of One of the World's Most Ancient Pleasures

by

Inventing Wine: A New History of One of the World's Most Ancient Pleasures Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Drinking wine can be traced back 8,000 years, yet the wines we drink today are radically different from those made in earlier eras. While its basic chemistry remains largely the same, wine's social roles have changed fundamentally, being invented and reinvented many times over many centuries.

In Inventing Wine, Paul Lukacs tells the enticing story of wine's transformation from a source of spiritual and bodily nourishment to a foodstuff valued for the wide array of pleasures it can provide. He chronicles how the prototypes of contemporary wines first emerged when people began to have options of what to drink, and he demonstrates that people selected wine for dramatically different reasons than those expressed when doing so was a necessity rather than a choice.

During wine's long history, men and women imbued wine with different cultural meanings and invented different cultural roles for it to play. The power of such invention belonged both to those drinking wine and to those producing it. These included tastemakers like the medieval Cistercian monks of Burgundy who first thought of place as an important aspect of wine's identity; nineteenth-century writers such as Grimod de la Reynière and Cyrus Redding who strived to give wine a rarefied aesthetic status; scientists like Louis Pasteur and Émile Peynaud who worked to help winemakers take more control over their craft; and a host of visionary vintners who aimed to produce better, more distinctive-tasting wines, eventually bringing high-quality wine to consumers around the globe.

By charting the changes in both wine's appreciation and its production, Lukacs offers a fascinating new way to look at the present as well as the past.

Review:

"Rather than an eternal cultural verity, wine is the product of innovative discontinuities, according to this flavorful history. Lukacs (American Vintage) argues that superlatively drinkable modern wines bear little resemblance to the barely potable swill — vinegary, quick-spoiling, adulterated (with lead!), used mainly to get drunk, commune with the gods, or decontaminate water — of centuries past. In his telling, that transformation is a story of technological revolutions, from the 17th century's new-fangled bottles and corks that kept souring oxygen away to latter-day temperature-controlled vats and winery chemistry labs. Intertwined were cultural and economic shifts that transformed wine from an intrinsically sacred object first to a secular commodity subject to intense market competition and then to a bourgeois art-beverage valued more for aesthetics and cachet than inebriating power. Lukacs combines an erudite, raptly appreciative connoisseurship of fine wines with lucid analyses of the prosaics of wine production, marketing and consumption. At times he succumbs too much to the mysticism of terroir, 'the complex interplay of soil, climate and culture' that makes a wine 'true to its origins,' even as much of the book tacitly debunks such 'invent traditions.' Still, his absorbing treatise shows just how much the grape's bounty owes to human ingenuity and imagination." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The story of how wine, as enjoyed by millions of people today, came to be.

Synopsis:

Wine is some 8,000 years old, but the wines that people buy and drink today are for the most part quite new. Modern wine exists as the product of multiple revolutions--scientific, industrial, social, even ideological. Though the same basic chemical substance as its ancient forebear, it is in every other respect very different. Contemporary wines both taste unlike those from earlier eras and are valued in novel ways. For many thousands of years, wine was a basic need. Today it is a cultural choice, and the reasons why millions of people choose it tells us as much about them as about the contents of bottle or glass.

In Inventing Wine, Paul Lukacs chronicles wine's transformation from a source of sustenance to a consciously pursued pleasure, in the process offering a new way to view the present as well as the past.

About the Author

Paul Lukacs is the author of The Great Wines of America and American Vintage, the recipient of the James Beard, IACP, and Clicquot Book of the Year awards. A professor of English at Loyola University Maryland, he lives in Baltimore.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393064520
Author:
Lukacs, Paul
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Lukacs, Paul
Subject:
Wine & Spirits
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Wines of the World
Publication Date:
20121231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Photography » Annuals
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Bartending and Liquor
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Wine » General
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Wine » Wines of the World
Cooking and Food » Beverages » Wines and Beer
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
Featured Titles » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties

Inventing Wine: A New History of One of the World's Most Ancient Pleasures New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$28.95 In Stock
Product details 384 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393064520 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Rather than an eternal cultural verity, wine is the product of innovative discontinuities, according to this flavorful history. Lukacs (American Vintage) argues that superlatively drinkable modern wines bear little resemblance to the barely potable swill — vinegary, quick-spoiling, adulterated (with lead!), used mainly to get drunk, commune with the gods, or decontaminate water — of centuries past. In his telling, that transformation is a story of technological revolutions, from the 17th century's new-fangled bottles and corks that kept souring oxygen away to latter-day temperature-controlled vats and winery chemistry labs. Intertwined were cultural and economic shifts that transformed wine from an intrinsically sacred object first to a secular commodity subject to intense market competition and then to a bourgeois art-beverage valued more for aesthetics and cachet than inebriating power. Lukacs combines an erudite, raptly appreciative connoisseurship of fine wines with lucid analyses of the prosaics of wine production, marketing and consumption. At times he succumbs too much to the mysticism of terroir, 'the complex interplay of soil, climate and culture' that makes a wine 'true to its origins,' even as much of the book tacitly debunks such 'invent traditions.' Still, his absorbing treatise shows just how much the grape's bounty owes to human ingenuity and imagination." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , The story of how wine, as enjoyed by millions of people today, came to be.
"Synopsis" by , Wine is some 8,000 years old, but the wines that people buy and drink today are for the most part quite new. Modern wine exists as the product of multiple revolutions--scientific, industrial, social, even ideological. Though the same basic chemical substance as its ancient forebear, it is in every other respect very different. Contemporary wines both taste unlike those from earlier eras and are valued in novel ways. For many thousands of years, wine was a basic need. Today it is a cultural choice, and the reasons why millions of people choose it tells us as much about them as about the contents of bottle or glass.

In Inventing Wine, Paul Lukacs chronicles wine's transformation from a source of sustenance to a consciously pursued pleasure, in the process offering a new way to view the present as well as the past.
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