Dreadfully Ever After Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Brian Doyle: IMG The Rude Burl of Our Masks



One day when I was 12 years old and setting off on my newspaper route after school my mom said will you stop at the doctor's and pick up something... Continue »
  1. $13.27 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    Children and Other Wild Animals

    Brian Doyle 9780870717543

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$30.00
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
4 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z
18 Remote Warehouse Literature- A to Z

East of Eden: John Steinbeck Centennial Edition (1902-2002)

by

East of Eden: John Steinbeck Centennial Edition (1902-2002) Cover

ISBN13: 9780670033041
ISBN10: 0670033049
All Product Details

 

Staff Pick

I was once told a good novel will set its tenor by the end of its first page, so lately I've been skimming the first page of prospective reads to test this theory. When I did this with Steinbeck's East of Eden, I couldn't stop; the assault of great writing never let up, and I knew I was irretrievably in for the long haul. No one writes exactly like Steinbeck, and this century-spanning book about two families in California's Salinas Valley finds the writer at his culminating genius (Steinbeck said, "I think everything else I have written has been, in a sense, practice for [East of Eden]."). His prose is vivid, fine, and panoramic in vision; his characters are so richly cast that he's capable of inducing a genuine sense of the glories and tragedies they experience. I read this book so compulsively (I stayed up till 4:00 a.m. one night / cancelled dates with friends / ate soup from a can) that I'm almost mad at myself for not savoring it more slowly, but there's ample consolation in Steinbeck's prolific career for any of his insatiable, expectant readers. Good follow-up read: Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters.
Recommended by Jae, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A masterpiece of Biblical scope, and the magnum opus of one of Americas most enduring authors, in a commemorative hardcover edition

 

In his journal, Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck called East of Eden "the first book," and indeed it has the primordial power and simplicity of myth. Set in the rich farmland of California's Salinas Valley, this sprawling and often brutal novel follows the intertwined destinies of two families—the Trasks and the Hamiltons—whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel.

The masterpiece of Steinbecks later years, East of Eden is a work in which Steinbeck created his most mesmerizing characters and explored his most enduring themes: the mystery of identity, the inexplicability of love, and the murderous consequences of love's absence. Adapted for the 1955 film directed by Elia Kazan introducing James Dean, and read by thousands as the book that brought Oprahs Book Club back, East of Eden has remained vitally present in American culture for over half a century.

Synopsis:

Penguin Classics commemorates the 50th anniversary of Steinbeck's Nobel Prize with Portable Steinbeck for the 21st century

It would be impossible to overstate John Steinbeck's enduring influence on American letters. Profuse with a richness of language, sly humor, and empathy for even his most flawed characters, Steinbeck's books are still widely read and deeply relevant today.

The Portable Steinbeck is a grand sampling of his most important and popular works. Here are the complete novels Of Mice and Men and The Red Pony, together with self-contained excerpts from several longer novels, the text of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, a fascinating introduction by Pascal Covici, Jr., son of Steinbeck's longtime editor, and brand new introduction from leading Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw that puts Steinbeck in the context of the 21st century. 

Synopsis:

This sprawling and often brutal novel, set in the rich farmlands of California's Salinas Valley, follows the intertwined destinies of two families--the Trasks and the Hamiltons--whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel. "A strange and original work of art".--New York Times Book Review.

About the Author

John Steinbeck, born in Salinas, California, in 1902, grew up in a fertile agricultural valley, about twenty-five miles from the Pacific Coast. Both the valley and the coast would serve as settings for some of his best fiction. In 1919 he went to Stanford University, where he intermittently enrolled in literature and writing courses until he left in 1925 without taking a degree. During the next five years he supported himself as a laborer and journalist in New York City, all the time working on his first novel, Cup of Gold (1929).

After marriage and a move to Pacific Grove, he published two California books, The Pastures of Heaven (1932) and To a God Unknown (1933), and worked on short stories later collected in The Long Valley (1938). Popular success and financial security came only with Tortilla Flat (1935), stories about Monterey’s paisanos. A ceaseless experimenter throughout his career, Steinbeck changed courses regularly. Three powerful novels of the late 1930s focused on the California laboring class: In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men (1937), and the book considered by many his finest, The Grapes of Wrath (1939). The Grapes of Wrath won both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize in 1939.

Early in the 1940s, Steinbeck became a filmmaker with The Forgotten Village (1941) and a serious student of marine biology with Sea of Cortez (1941). He devoted his services to the war, writing Bombs Away (1942) and the controversial play-novelette The Moon is Down (1942). Cannery Row (1945), The Wayward Bus (1948), another experimental drama, Burning Bright (1950), and The Log from the Sea of Cortez (1951) preceded publication of the monumental East of Eden (1952), an ambitious saga of the Salinas Valley and his own family’s history.

The last decades of his life were spent in New York City and Sag Harbor with his third wife, with whom he traveled widely. Later books include Sweet Thursday (1954), The Short Reign of Pippin IV: A Fabrication (1957), Once There Was a War (1958), The Winter of Our Discontent (1961), Travels with Charley in Search of America (1962), America and Americans (1966), and the posthumously published Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters (1969), Viva Zapata! (1975), The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights (1976), and Working Days: The Journals of The Grapes of Wrath (1989).

Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962, and, in 1964, he was presented with the United States Medal of Freedom by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Steinbeck died in New York in 1968. Today, more than thirty years after his death, he remains one of America's greatest writers and cultural figures.

Pascal Covici, Jr., son of John Steinbeck's long-time editor and friend at The Viking Press, received his Ph.D. from Harvard and taught at Southern Methodist University.

Susan Shillinglaw is director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Diane Rocha, January 4, 2012 (view all comments by Diane Rocha)
This book still holds up after all these years and after the sixth read for me. This time I read it along with its companion, Journal of a Novel, the journal entries Steinbeck wrote to his friend and publisher, Pascal Covici, each day that he wrote E of E. Decades ago, when I read E of E the last time, the concept of Timshel changed my life. This reading deepened my understanding of that concept, so much so that I followed up with two volumes of literary criticism. I was stunned and dismayed at what I read. Some critics panned Steinbeck for his "sentimentalism," but I disagree. First and foremost, his writing is beautiful. He is able to take his reader along a journey with him through the Salinas valley such that we not only see it - we are there with him - breathing the air he breathed - gazing at the long valley and the mountains at which he gazed so long ago. And the story is enthralling. It is his story - his family's story - of love and betrayal - of wide-eyed innocence turned to despair - and redemption.

Read it. It may change your life too. If nothing else, you'll be transported back to a time and a place where life was so much simpler - basic - and far less traffic. : )
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
harold williams, August 18, 2007 (view all comments by harold williams)
Although this book is almost 800 pages long, you won't want it to end. You'll love the "good" characters such as Adam Trask and Samuel Hamilton, and you'll yearn for the demise of the "bad" characters such as Charles Trask and Cathy Ames. Did pretty little Cathy really murder her parents, a teacher, a brothel owner, and a close friend? Why would Cathy betray her husband by having sex with his brother? Although Steinbeck makes many allusions to the Bible, anyone can understand the universal struggle between good and evil. Sometimes the lines are blurred when the "bad" characters do something good. Most interesting books have very strong characters, and this book is no exception.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(8 of 13 readers found this comment helpful)
jazzydaniels, November 5, 2006 (view all comments by jazzydaniels)
East of Eden is an intense novel. It must be read closely in order to understand further meaning. I reccommend reading Genesis before reading East of Eden, for there are many allusions to the Bible.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670033041
Author:
Steinbeck, John
Publisher:
Viking Books
Author:
Shillinglaw, Susan
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Fathers and sons
Subject:
Brothers
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Sibling rivalry
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Salinas River Valley
Subject:
Children of prostitutes
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
108-58
Publication Date:
20030631
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
608
Dimensions:
8.72x6.09x1.76 in. 1.64 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

Other books you might like

  1. The Emperor of Ocean Park: A Novel Used Trade Paper $2.50
  2. The Inheritors (Harvest Book) Used Trade Paper $3.50
  3. The Jane Austen Book Club
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  4. Get a Life Used Trade Paper $2.95
  5. War & Peace Used Trade Paper $1.95
  6. Ghostwritten (Vintage International)
    Used Trade Paper $10.95

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

East of Eden: John Steinbeck Centennial Edition (1902-2002) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$30.00 In Stock
Product details 608 pages Viking Books - English 9780670033041 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

I was once told a good novel will set its tenor by the end of its first page, so lately I've been skimming the first page of prospective reads to test this theory. When I did this with Steinbeck's East of Eden, I couldn't stop; the assault of great writing never let up, and I knew I was irretrievably in for the long haul. No one writes exactly like Steinbeck, and this century-spanning book about two families in California's Salinas Valley finds the writer at his culminating genius (Steinbeck said, "I think everything else I have written has been, in a sense, practice for [East of Eden]."). His prose is vivid, fine, and panoramic in vision; his characters are so richly cast that he's capable of inducing a genuine sense of the glories and tragedies they experience. I read this book so compulsively (I stayed up till 4:00 a.m. one night / cancelled dates with friends / ate soup from a can) that I'm almost mad at myself for not savoring it more slowly, but there's ample consolation in Steinbeck's prolific career for any of his insatiable, expectant readers. Good follow-up read: Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters.

"Synopsis" by ,

Penguin Classics commemorates the 50th anniversary of Steinbeck's Nobel Prize with Portable Steinbeck for the 21st century

It would be impossible to overstate John Steinbeck's enduring influence on American letters. Profuse with a richness of language, sly humor, and empathy for even his most flawed characters, Steinbeck's books are still widely read and deeply relevant today.

The Portable Steinbeck is a grand sampling of his most important and popular works. Here are the complete novels Of Mice and Men and The Red Pony, together with self-contained excerpts from several longer novels, the text of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, a fascinating introduction by Pascal Covici, Jr., son of Steinbeck's longtime editor, and brand new introduction from leading Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw that puts Steinbeck in the context of the 21st century. 

"Synopsis" by , This sprawling and often brutal novel, set in the rich farmlands of California's Salinas Valley, follows the intertwined destinies of two families--the Trasks and the Hamiltons--whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel. "A strange and original work of art".--New York Times Book Review.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.