The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 18, 2014

Lin Enger: IMG Knowing vs. Knowing



On a hot July evening years ago, my Toyota Tercel overheated on a flat stretch of highway north of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A steam geyser shot up from... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The High Divide

    Lin Enger 9781616203757

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$109.50
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
25 Remote Warehouse World History- General

Other titles in the Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology series:

Origins of Democratic Culture: Printing, Petitions, and the Public Sphere in Early-Modern England (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology)

by

Origins of Democratic Culture: Printing, Petitions, and the Public Sphere in Early-Modern England (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This innovative work of historical sociology locates the origins of modern democratic discourse in the emergent culture of printing in early modern England. For David Zaret, the key to the rise of a democratic public sphere was the impact of this culture of printing on the secrecy and privilege that shrouded political decisions in seventeenth-century England. Zaret explores the unanticipated liberating effects of printing and printed communication in transforming the world of political secrecy into a culture of open discourse and eventually a politics of public opinion.

Contrary to those who locate the origins of the public sphere in the philosophical tracts of the French Enlightenment, Zaret claims that it originated as a practical accomplishment, propelled by economic and technical aspects of printing--in particular heightened commercialism and increased capacity to produce texts. Zaret writes that this accomplishment gained impetus when competing elites--Royalists and Parliamentarians, Presbyterians and Independents--used printed material to reach the masses, whose leaders in turn invoked the authority of public opinion to lobby those elites.

Zaret further shows how the earlier traditions of communication in England, from ballads and broadsides to inn and alehouse conversation, merged with the new culture of print to upset prevailing norms of secrecy and privilege. He points as well to the paradox for today's critics, who attribute the impoverishment of the public sphere to the very technological and economic forces that brought about the means of democratic discourse in the first place.

Synopsis:

This innovative work of historical sociology locates the origins of modern democratic discourse in the emergent culture of printing in early modern England. For David Zaret, the key to the rise of a democratic public sphere was the impact of this culture of printing on the secrecy and privilege that shrouded political decisions in seventeenth-century England. Zaret explores the unanticipated liberating effects of printing and printed communication in transforming the world of political secrecy into a culture of open discourse and eventually a politics of public opinion.

Contrary to those who locate the origins of the public sphere in the philosophical tracts of the French Enlightenment, Zaret claims that it originated as a practical accomplishment, propelled by economic and technical aspects of printing--in particular heightened commercialism and increased capacity to produce texts. Zaret writes that this accomplishment gained impetus when competing elites--Royalists and Parliamentarians, Presbyterians and Independents--used printed material to reach the masses, whose leaders in turn invoked the authority of public opinion to lobby those elites.

Zaret further shows how the earlier traditions of communication in England, from ballads and broadsides to inn and alehouse conversation, merged with the new culture of print to upset prevailing norms of secrecy and privilege. He points as well to the paradox for today's critics, who attribute the impoverishment of the public sphere to the very technological and economic forces that brought about the means of democratic discourse in the first place.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix

Acknowledgments xi

Abbreviations xiii

Chapter One Introduction 3

Chapter Two Theory and History 18

Theories of the Early Public Sphere 21

Historical Revisionism 35

The Paradox of Innovation 39

Chapter Three Secrecy and Privilege 44

Principle 50

Contradictions between Secrecy Norms and Political Practice 61

Chapter Four Traditional Communicative Practice 68

Center to Periphery 69

Periphery to Center 75

Grievances and Petitions 81

Chapter Five News 100

Oral News: Rumors and Ballads 109

Scribal News 110

Chapter Six Printing and the Culture of Print 133

Presses and Printers 134

Legal and Political Issues 140

Authors and Sellers 145

Popular Literacy and Reading 150

Illicit Books 159

Appeals to Public Opinion in Religion to 1640 165

Chapter Seven Printing and Politics in the 1640s 174

Imposition of Dialogic Order on Conflict 176

Printed News 184

Printed Political Texts 197

Invoking Public Opinion 209

Chapter Eight Petitions 217

Petitions as Political Propaganda 221

Petitions as Indicators of Opinion in the Periphery 231

Petitions and Printing 240

The Paradox of Innovation in Petitioning 254

The Authority of Opinion 257

Toward Liberal Democracy 262

Chapter Nine Epilogue 266

Deism, Science, and Opinion 270

Contemporary Implications 275

Index 281

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691006949
Author:
Zaret, David
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
Great britain
Subject:
History
Subject:
Politics and government
Subject:
Public opinion
Subject:
Democracy
Subject:
Literacy
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Civil society
Subject:
1066-1485
Subject:
Opinion publique
Subject:
Grande-Bretagne
Subject:
Dâemocratie
Subject:
Sociâetâe civile
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain - General
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Democracy
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Comparative Literature
Subject:
European History
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Great Britain Politics and government.
Subject:
Public opinion -- England -- History.
Subject:
Co
Subject:
mparative Literature
Subject:
World History-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Series:
Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology
Series Volume:
v. 6, no. 95
Publication Date:
December 1999
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 halftones
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 21 oz

Related Subjects

» Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
» Business » Communication
» Business » General
» History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
» History and Social Science » Politics » General
» History and Social Science » World History » England » General
» History and Social Science » World History » General
» Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Origins of Democratic Culture: Printing, Petitions, and the Public Sphere in Early-Modern England (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$109.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691006949 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This innovative work of historical sociology locates the origins of modern democratic discourse in the emergent culture of printing in early modern England. For David Zaret, the key to the rise of a democratic public sphere was the impact of this culture of printing on the secrecy and privilege that shrouded political decisions in seventeenth-century England. Zaret explores the unanticipated liberating effects of printing and printed communication in transforming the world of political secrecy into a culture of open discourse and eventually a politics of public opinion.

Contrary to those who locate the origins of the public sphere in the philosophical tracts of the French Enlightenment, Zaret claims that it originated as a practical accomplishment, propelled by economic and technical aspects of printing--in particular heightened commercialism and increased capacity to produce texts. Zaret writes that this accomplishment gained impetus when competing elites--Royalists and Parliamentarians, Presbyterians and Independents--used printed material to reach the masses, whose leaders in turn invoked the authority of public opinion to lobby those elites.

Zaret further shows how the earlier traditions of communication in England, from ballads and broadsides to inn and alehouse conversation, merged with the new culture of print to upset prevailing norms of secrecy and privilege. He points as well to the paradox for today's critics, who attribute the impoverishment of the public sphere to the very technological and economic forces that brought about the means of democratic discourse in the first place.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.