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The Right to Stay Home: How US Policy Drives Mexican Migration

by

The Right to Stay Home: How US Policy Drives Mexican Migration Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"Bacon (Illegal People), a labor organizer, immigrant-rights activist, and journalist, describes the factors that drive Mexican migrants across the border and into the U.S. These include the economic effects of NAFTA, environmental degradation, health hazards, anti-union policies, and, above all, low wages and poverty. As Bacon notes, 95% of the jobs created in Mexico in 2010 pay around per day. He also examines the harsh conditions many Mexican migrants face in the U.S., such as the criminalization of undocumented immigration (whereas previously, undocumented immigrants were allowed to return to Mexico voluntarily) and the economic exploitation of short-term agricultural 'guest' workers. By providing billions in remittances to Mexico while increasing U.S. corporations' profits, Mexican migrants serve the interests of both countries, Bacon observes. In a concluding chapter, he offers a number of ideas for reform, including giving migrant workers green cards instead of work-based visas and renegotiating trade agreements to eliminate the causes of Mexican workers' displacement. Bacon's book, which is enhanced by 11 personal narratives, will help readers gain a significantly more sophisticated understanding of the context and on-the-ground reality of undocumented migrants in the U.S. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Award-winning photojournalist and author, David Bacon has spent twenty years as a labor organizer and immigrant rights activist. He has been a reporter and documentary photographer for eighteen years, shooting for many national publications, and has exhibited his work internationally. He is an associate editor at Pacific News Service and hosts a weekly radio show on labor, immigration, and the global economy on KPFA-FM.

Table of Contents

Contents

 

Introduction ix

 

One

From Perote to Tar Heel

Pushing People out of Veracruz  1

Smithfield Goes to Mexico  4

And Veracruz Migrants Come to the United States  10

The Union Campaign in Tar Heel  14

Demands for Change, on Both Sides of the Border  18

A Union for Tobacco Workers  22

Narrative One. You Don’t Need to Be a Doctor or Scientist

to Smell the Stench: The Story of Fausto Limon 31

Narrative Two. We’re Here Because of the Economic Crisis:

The Story of David Ceja and Guadalupe Marroquin 35

Two

Cursed by Gold or Blessed by Corn

Communities Resist Canadian Mining Companies  41

Killings in San Jose del Progreso  47

Oaxacans Debate Poverty and Migration  53

A Government Committed to the Right to Not Migrate?  61

Can the Triquis Go Home?  71

Narrative Three. If We Don’t Attack the Roots

of Migration, It Will Continue to Grow:

The Story of Rufino Dominguez 82

Narrative Four. We Want to Talk about the Right

to Stay Home: The Story of Aldo Gonzalez 93

 

Three

The Right to a Union Means the Right to Stay Home

Mexican Miners Resist Repression and Poverty  98

Labor Law Reform a Boss Could Love  104

Calderon Goes to War with the SME  113

Migration and Cross-Border Labor Solidarity  122

Narrative Five. We’re Fighting for Our Right to Keep on

Living in Cananea: The Story of Jacinto Martinez 130

 

Narrative Six. No Matter What the Result, We Will Continue

to Resist: The Story of Humberto Montes de Oca 135

 

Four   

Defending the Human Rights of Migrants

Special Courtrooms for Immigrants  142

Bush Ties Workplace Raids to Immigration Reform  146

Myths and Realities of Enforcement  153

Mississippi Resists Political Raids and Anti-Immigrant Bills  158

Utah’s Immigration Bills: A Blast from the Past  170

 

Narrative Seven. They Pay Us a Wage That Barely Allows Us

to Make a Living: The Story of Lucrecia Camacho 177

 

Narrative Eight. We Made Them Millions of Dollars:

The Story of Lupe Chavez 184

 

Five

Fighting the Firings

Mass Firings: The Obama Administration’s Workplace Enforcement Policy  188

The Firings Spread, along with Resistance  195

Protest Tactics Cross the Border  204

Marching Away from the Cold War  211

 

Narrative Nine. This Law Is Very Unjust:

The Story of Teresa Mina 220

 

Narrative Ten. When We Speak You Hear a Roar:

The Story of Keith Ludlum and Terry Slaughter 223

 

Six

Human Beings or Just Workers?

How Do You Say Justice in Mixteco?  230

Something Less Than Citizens  238

Enforcing Labor Rights for Border Crossers  247

Canada’s “Model” Guest Worker Program  253

The Pitfalls of Regulating Guest Worker Programs  261

 

Narrative Eleven. The Future Doesn’t Exist for Us Here:

The Story of Miguel Huerta 270

 

Seven

The Right to Not Migrate and Radical Reform 273

Challenging the Washington, DC, Consensus  274

The Right to Not Migrate Is a Social Movement  283

 

Acknowledgments  288

Sources  289

Index  292

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807001615
Author:
Bacon, David
Publisher:
Beacon Press (MA)
Subject:
Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Immigration
Publication Date:
20131031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
328
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.3 x 1.17 in 1.38 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Labor
History and Social Science » World History » General
Travel » General

The Right to Stay Home: How US Policy Drives Mexican Migration New Hardcover
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$27.95 In Stock
Product details 328 pages Beacon Press (MA) - English 9780807001615 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Bacon (Illegal People), a labor organizer, immigrant-rights activist, and journalist, describes the factors that drive Mexican migrants across the border and into the U.S. These include the economic effects of NAFTA, environmental degradation, health hazards, anti-union policies, and, above all, low wages and poverty. As Bacon notes, 95% of the jobs created in Mexico in 2010 pay around per day. He also examines the harsh conditions many Mexican migrants face in the U.S., such as the criminalization of undocumented immigration (whereas previously, undocumented immigrants were allowed to return to Mexico voluntarily) and the economic exploitation of short-term agricultural 'guest' workers. By providing billions in remittances to Mexico while increasing U.S. corporations' profits, Mexican migrants serve the interests of both countries, Bacon observes. In a concluding chapter, he offers a number of ideas for reform, including giving migrant workers green cards instead of work-based visas and renegotiating trade agreements to eliminate the causes of Mexican workers' displacement. Bacon's book, which is enhanced by 11 personal narratives, will help readers gain a significantly more sophisticated understanding of the context and on-the-ground reality of undocumented migrants in the U.S. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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