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An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases

An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A brilliant, cutting-edge exploration of the dramatic rise of allergic and autoimmune diseases and the controversial, potentially groundbreaking therapies that scientists are developing to correct these disorders

Whether it is asthma, food or pollen allergies, type-1 diabetes, lupus, multiple sclerosis, or Crohn’s disease, everyone knows someone who suffers from an allergic or autoimmune disorder. And if it appears that the prevalence of these maladies has increased recently, that’s because it has—to levels never before seen in human history. These days no fewer than one in five—and likely more—Americans suffers from one of these ailments. We seem newly, and bafflingly, vulnerable to immune system malfunction. Why? Science writer Moises Velasquez-Manoff explains the latest thinking about this problem and explores the remarkable new treatments in the works.

In the past 150 years, improved sanitation, water treatment, and the advent of vaccines and antibiotics have saved countless lives, nearly eradicating diseases that had plagued humanity for millennia. But now, a growing body of evidence suggests that the very steps we took to combat infections also eliminated organisms that kept our bodies in balance. The idea that we have systematically cleaned ourselves to illness challenges deeply entrenched notions about the value of societal hygiene and the harmful nature of microbes. Yet scientists investigating the rampant immune dysfunction in the developed world have inevitably arrived at this conclusion. To address this global “epidemic of absence,” they must restore the human ecosystem.

This groundbreaking book explores the promising but controversial “worm therapy”—deliberate infection with parasitic worms—in development to treat autoimmune disease. It explains why farmers’ children so rarely get hay fever, why allergy is less prevalent in former Eastern Bloc countries, and how one cancer-causing bacterium may be good for us. It probes the link between autism and a dysfunctional immune system. It investigates the newly apparent fetal origins of allergic disease—that a mother’s inflammatory response imprints on her unborn child, tipping the scales toward allergy. In the future, preventive treatment—something as simple as a probiotic—will necessarily begin before birth.

An Epidemic of Absence asks what will happen in developing countries, which, as they become more affluent, have already seen an uptick in allergic disease: Will India end up more allergic than Europe? Velasquez-Manoff also details a controversial underground movement that has coalesced around the treatment of immune-mediated disorders with parasites. Against much of his better judgment, he joins these do-it-yourselfers and reports his surprising results.

An Epidemic of Absence considers the critical immune stimuli we inadvertently lost as we modernized, and the modern ills we may be able to correct by restoring them. At stake is nothing less than our health, and that of our loved ones. Researchers, meanwhile, have the good fortune of living through a paradigm shift, one of those occasional moments in the progress of science when a radically new way of thinking emerges, shakes things up, and suggests new avenues of treatment. You’ll discover that you’re not you at all, but a bustling collection of organisms, an ecosystem whose preservation and integrity require the utmost attention and care.

Review:

"We've spent generations cleaning up the bad organisms that once burrowed inside the human gut — but may want to put some of them back, writes science journalist Velasquez-Manoff in this ambitious survey of how evolution and ecology affect our biology and health. Allergies, asthma, type-1 diabetes, psoriasis, lupus, and celiac diseases have all become more frequent in the past 30,000 years while our exposure to parasites and microbes that normally take up residence in the gut has plummeted. But these organisms, far from being harmful, actually contribute to an ecological balance in our bodies that also balances the immune system. Velasquez-Manoff, who suffers from eczema, alopecia, and asthma, investigates the 'hookworm underground' to score a supply to abate his own storm of autoimmune maladies — with queasy, mixed results. But there are more positive returns for others, including a 21-year-old woman suffering from Crohn's disease who believes that whipworms saved her life. Velasquez-Manoff also investigates how microbes prevent allergic diseases and may even play a role in autism. If the parasite cure seems hard to swallow, the message is not: medicine will have to take account of patients' inner and outer ecology if we're ever to unravel the cause and treatment of disease. Agent: Kristine Dahl, ICM. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A brilliant, cutting-edge report on the rise of allergic and autoimmune disease—and the controversial new “worm therapy” that scientists are considering to treat it.

Whether it’s asthma, Crohn’s Disease, or food or pollen allergies, everyone knows someone who suffers from an autoimmune or allergic disorder. But why are they on the rise? 

     Science writer Moises Velasquez-Manoff offers a new and controversial way of thinking about immune-mediated disease—one that may foster a paradigm shift in the way we think about health and hygiene.

     In the early twentieth century, improved hygiene, water treatment, vaccines, and antibiotics saved countless lives, nearly eradicating diseases that had plagued humanity for millennia. But in the wake of this triumph, a new problem arose: The human immune system began to malfunction.

     A growing body of evidence suggests that the very steps we took to combat infectious disease have also eliminated organisms that once kept our bodies in balance. To address this “epidemic of absence,” some scientists have begun deliberately reintroducing parasitic worms—helminths—to calm the immune system of their hosts. This book takes a close look at the scientists at the vanguard of “worm therapy,” which has shown promise not only in preempting immune malfunction, but in sending a number of disorders—from Crohn’s Disease to multiple sclerosis to asthma—into remission.

     Exploring the greater context of rampant immune system dysfunction in the developed world, and its implications for developing countries, Velasquez-Manoff offers an eye-opening and elegant portrait of science’s new view of the human organism, one that springs from a belated recognition of our intimate connection with bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

About the Author

Moises Velasquez-Manoff covered science and the environment for The Christian Science Monitor, and his work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Chicago Tribune, and Slate, among other publications. He graduated from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism’s Master of Arts program, with a concentration in science writing.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781439199381
Subtitle:
A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases
Publisher:
Scribner
Author:
Velasquez-Manoff, Moises
Subject:
Bacteriology
Subject:
Biography/Medical
Subject:
Developmental Biology
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20120904
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Biography » Medical
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
History and Social Science » Current Affairs » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Microbiology

An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 400 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9781439199381 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "We've spent generations cleaning up the bad organisms that once burrowed inside the human gut — but may want to put some of them back, writes science journalist Velasquez-Manoff in this ambitious survey of how evolution and ecology affect our biology and health. Allergies, asthma, type-1 diabetes, psoriasis, lupus, and celiac diseases have all become more frequent in the past 30,000 years while our exposure to parasites and microbes that normally take up residence in the gut has plummeted. But these organisms, far from being harmful, actually contribute to an ecological balance in our bodies that also balances the immune system. Velasquez-Manoff, who suffers from eczema, alopecia, and asthma, investigates the 'hookworm underground' to score a supply to abate his own storm of autoimmune maladies — with queasy, mixed results. But there are more positive returns for others, including a 21-year-old woman suffering from Crohn's disease who believes that whipworms saved her life. Velasquez-Manoff also investigates how microbes prevent allergic diseases and may even play a role in autism. If the parasite cure seems hard to swallow, the message is not: medicine will have to take account of patients' inner and outer ecology if we're ever to unravel the cause and treatment of disease. Agent: Kristine Dahl, ICM. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A brilliant, cutting-edge report on the rise of allergic and autoimmune disease—and the controversial new “worm therapy” that scientists are considering to treat it.

Whether it’s asthma, Crohn’s Disease, or food or pollen allergies, everyone knows someone who suffers from an autoimmune or allergic disorder. But why are they on the rise? 

     Science writer Moises Velasquez-Manoff offers a new and controversial way of thinking about immune-mediated disease—one that may foster a paradigm shift in the way we think about health and hygiene.

     In the early twentieth century, improved hygiene, water treatment, vaccines, and antibiotics saved countless lives, nearly eradicating diseases that had plagued humanity for millennia. But in the wake of this triumph, a new problem arose: The human immune system began to malfunction.

     A growing body of evidence suggests that the very steps we took to combat infectious disease have also eliminated organisms that once kept our bodies in balance. To address this “epidemic of absence,” some scientists have begun deliberately reintroducing parasitic worms—helminths—to calm the immune system of their hosts. This book takes a close look at the scientists at the vanguard of “worm therapy,” which has shown promise not only in preempting immune malfunction, but in sending a number of disorders—from Crohn’s Disease to multiple sclerosis to asthma—into remission.

     Exploring the greater context of rampant immune system dysfunction in the developed world, and its implications for developing countries, Velasquez-Manoff offers an eye-opening and elegant portrait of science’s new view of the human organism, one that springs from a belated recognition of our intimate connection with bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

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