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Midnight in Mexico Signed 1st Edition

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Midnight in Mexico Signed 1st Edition Cover

ISBN13: 9781594204395
ISBN10: 159420439x
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the last six years, more than eighty thousand people have been killed in the Mexican drug war, and drug trafficking there is a multibillion-dollar business. In a country where the powerful are rarely scrutinized, noted Mexican American journalist Alfredo Corchado refuses to shrink from reporting on government corruption, murders in Juarez, or the ruthless drug cartels of Mexico. A paramilitary group spun off from the Gulf cartel, the Zetas, controls key drug routes in the north of the country. In 2007, Corchado received a tip that he could be their next target — and he had twenty four hours to find out if the threat was true.

Rather than leave his country, Corchado went out into the Mexican countryside to trace investigate the threat. As he frantically contacted his sources, Corchado suspected the threat was his punishment for returning to Mexico against his mother's wishes. His parents had fled north after the death of their young daughter, and raised their children in California where they labored as migrant workers. Corchado returned to Mexico as a journalist in 1994, convinced that Mexico would one day foster political accountability and leave behind the pervasive corruption that has plagued its people for decades.

But in this land of extremes, the gap of inequality — and injustice — remains wide. Even after the 2000 election that put Mexico's opposition party in power for the first time, the opportunities of democracy did not materialize. The powerful PRI had worked with the cartels, taking a piece of their profit in exchange for a more peaceful, and more controlled, drug trade. But the party's long-awaited defeat created a vacuum of power in Mexico City, and in the cartel-controlled states that border the United States. The cartels went to war with one another in the mid-2000s, during the war to regain control of the country instituted by President Felipe Calderón, and only the violence flourished. The work Corchado lives for could have killed him, but he wasn't ready to leave Mexico — not then, maybe never. Midnight in Mexico is the story of one man's quest to report the truth of his country — as he raced to save his own life.

Review:

"Electrifying…the portrait that Corcahdo paints is all the more heartrending for Mexico's extraordinary promise....Security and the drug war that are Mexico's biggest worries…watching Corchado struggle in the crucible, trying to do the right thing by his two homelands, one can't help being reminded…the dawn that will follow this 'midnight in Mexico' will come only if we take some of the responsibility. The health of this neighbor is integral to our own." Washington Post

Review:

"Corchado looks at Mexico's darkest hour. And doesn't blink." Alan Cheuse, Dallas Morning News

Review:

"A riveting account that features many of the places and personalities that have been central to Mexico's recent nightmare….Corchado is a dogged and savvy journalist who manages to be everywhere a good reported should be….A unique binational perspective on the two countries he calls home, expressing admiration for the determination of U.S. and Mexican officials to fight a shared problem by taking on shared responsibility." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"[Corchado's] solid research and detailed understanding of the forces at work there make the book an important one for anyone who cares about Mexico, and his personal struggle with his homeland make it a raw, compelling read." Miami Herald

Review:

"The secret revealed at [Midnight in Mexico's] conclusion is more compelling than Citizen Kane's 'Rosebud'… I won't spoil the ending here, but you will shiver when you get there, and you may even weep. Either way, you will understand Corchado's need to stay in Mexico and his need to bring us stories that we need to read." Texas Observer

Review:

"Having lived and reported through four presidencies….His own story is emblematic….People are willing to do anything about Latin America other than read about it, or so it's been said. This is one book about Latin America that merits attention." Kirkus

Review:

"This book is about the blood-drenched borderlands that divide Alfredo Corchado's two countries, Mexico and the United States, which still dominate his own life. Told against the backdrop of the horrifically violent drug wars that have turned much of Mexico into a charnel land, Corchado shares his own story and that of his family with a moving degree of honesty and acuity. Corchado's love for his immigrant family and pride in what they have achieved is palpable, yet weighted down by a sense of what they, and Mexico, may have lost forever in the exchange. In many ways, Midnight in Mexico stands as a raw, real-life parable for the paradoxes of the Mexican-American experience, and it is both a riveting and gut-wrenching read." Jon Lee Anderson, author of Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life and The Fall of Baghdad

Synopsis:

A crusading Mexican-American journalist searches for justice and hope in an increasingly violent Mexico.

In the last decade, more than 100,000 people have been killed or disappeared in the Mexican drug war, and drug trafficking there is a multibillion-dollar business. In a country where the powerful are rarely scrutinized, noted Mexican-American journalist Alfredo Corchado refuses to shrink from reporting on government corruption, murders in Juárez, or the ruthless drug cartels of Mexico. One night, Corchado received a tip that he could be the next target of the Zetas, a violent paramilitary group — and that he had twenty-four hours to find out if the threat was true. Midnight in Mexico is the story of one mans quest to report the truth of his country — as he races to save his own life.

About the Author

Alfredo Corchadois a Nieman, Woodrow Wilson, and Rockefeller fellow and the Mexico bureau chief of the Dallas Morning News. In 2000, he was the first reporter granted an interview with then newly-elected president Vicente Fox. He lives in Mexico City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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sinsalcbg, February 24, 2014 (view all comments by sinsalcbg)
Corchado, Alfredo. "Midnight in Mexico" (New York: Penguin Books, 2013).
Waiting to catch a plane in Mazatlán recently I spied this book for sale as "Medianoche en México" (Mexico City: Debate 2013) and purchased it without knowing it was a translation. After reading it I found it to be a good quality conversion into Spanish by Juan Elias Tovar Cross.

Corchado’s memoir as a reporter assigned by the Dallas Morning News to report on contemporary Mexico covers, roughly, the years in which drug trafficking became a truly notorious development in Mexico, from 1994 to 2012, when he returned to the U.S.

I happened to write this review just a few hours after Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzman Loera, the world’s most wanted criminal and alleged capo of the Sinaloa Cartel, was locked behind bars in what is supposed to be Mexico’s maximum security prison known as “Almoloya de Juarez” located outside of Mexico City. His detention made worldwide news today, proof that people around the globe became aware of the hideousness of drug trafficking south of our border. Some serious repercussions are predicted by many as a result of El Chapo’s imprisonment who, of course, is discussed in "Midnight." There’s no doubt that there is tough work ahead in making this dreaded affliction disappear from Mexican society.

Happily, the interested reader can access more than a handful of what look like good book reviews of Corchado’s "Midnight in Mexico" online and so I’ll limit my own "reseña" to include a couple of abiding impressions I gained.

First, I recommend "Midnight" because the author guides the reader to appreciate the verve & drive of a young professional committed to showing the world that he can do the job and rise to the top. And, obviously, Corchado, once a migrant worker in California, was quite successful. This note touched me in a special way because the author is a Mexican American, born in Mexico, whose parents encouraged him to cross the border so that he could thrive. He’s a Chicano frayed between his loyalty to the United States and his wanting to see his parent’s home country, once his own, rise with dignity as a progressive nation. Most Anglo Americans have absolutely no sense of what these conflicting feelings might be and so reading this book might help appreciate this.

Perhaps the biggest thought I drew from this book is that Corchado cautiously lets the reader learn of the complex and convoluted relationships that arise between the drug capos and the politicians who run the country. Long ago, I had concluded a relationship of sorts existed but "Midnight" allowed me to appreciate and understand it a bit more. There is a political delicateness involved not only on the part of Mexican authorities but American ones too. Corchado’s most important informant, an “American investigator,” admits to these unnerving and dicey double-binding situations in the last chapters. In other words, to condemn Mexican officials as merely corrupt and inept and dismiss the whole Mexican drug schmear as a symptom of underdevelopment, or something akin to that, may satisfy many pedestrian observers but not others who know of the cultural and social intricacies involved.

"Midnight" is helpful because it is a personalized angle that lets us know how subtle and dangerous these intricacies can be in a society torn by poverty, bone-deep traditional ways, and the growing pressures for transparency and good government. Few Americans can appreciate these dilemmas.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781594204395
Subtitle:
A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent Into Darkness
Author:
Corchado, Alfredo
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
Crime - True Crime
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20140527
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Featured Titles » General
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
History and Social Science » Latin America » Mexico
History and Social Science » World History » Central America
History and Social Science » World History » Mexico

Midnight in Mexico Signed 1st Edition Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$27.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Penguin Books - English 9781594204395 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Electrifying…the portrait that Corcahdo paints is all the more heartrending for Mexico's extraordinary promise....Security and the drug war that are Mexico's biggest worries…watching Corchado struggle in the crucible, trying to do the right thing by his two homelands, one can't help being reminded…the dawn that will follow this 'midnight in Mexico' will come only if we take some of the responsibility. The health of this neighbor is integral to our own."
"Review" by , "Corchado looks at Mexico's darkest hour. And doesn't blink."
"Review" by , "A riveting account that features many of the places and personalities that have been central to Mexico's recent nightmare….Corchado is a dogged and savvy journalist who manages to be everywhere a good reported should be….A unique binational perspective on the two countries he calls home, expressing admiration for the determination of U.S. and Mexican officials to fight a shared problem by taking on shared responsibility."
"Review" by , "[Corchado's] solid research and detailed understanding of the forces at work there make the book an important one for anyone who cares about Mexico, and his personal struggle with his homeland make it a raw, compelling read."
"Review" by , "The secret revealed at [Midnight in Mexico's] conclusion is more compelling than Citizen Kane's 'Rosebud'… I won't spoil the ending here, but you will shiver when you get there, and you may even weep. Either way, you will understand Corchado's need to stay in Mexico and his need to bring us stories that we need to read."
"Review" by , "Having lived and reported through four presidencies….His own story is emblematic….People are willing to do anything about Latin America other than read about it, or so it's been said. This is one book about Latin America that merits attention."
"Review" by , "This book is about the blood-drenched borderlands that divide Alfredo Corchado's two countries, Mexico and the United States, which still dominate his own life. Told against the backdrop of the horrifically violent drug wars that have turned much of Mexico into a charnel land, Corchado shares his own story and that of his family with a moving degree of honesty and acuity. Corchado's love for his immigrant family and pride in what they have achieved is palpable, yet weighted down by a sense of what they, and Mexico, may have lost forever in the exchange. In many ways, Midnight in Mexico stands as a raw, real-life parable for the paradoxes of the Mexican-American experience, and it is both a riveting and gut-wrenching read."
"Synopsis" by , A crusading Mexican-American journalist searches for justice and hope in an increasingly violent Mexico.

In the last decade, more than 100,000 people have been killed or disappeared in the Mexican drug war, and drug trafficking there is a multibillion-dollar business. In a country where the powerful are rarely scrutinized, noted Mexican-American journalist Alfredo Corchado refuses to shrink from reporting on government corruption, murders in Juárez, or the ruthless drug cartels of Mexico. One night, Corchado received a tip that he could be the next target of the Zetas, a violent paramilitary group — and that he had twenty-four hours to find out if the threat was true. Midnight in Mexico is the story of one mans quest to report the truth of his country — as he races to save his own life.

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