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How to Live Like a Lord Without Really Trying

by

How to Live Like a Lord Without Really Trying Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For most of us, the distinction between and#147;old moneyand#8221; and and#147;new moneyand#8221; doesnand#8217;t matterand#151;weand#8217;re neither. But for some there is a very clear difference, with members of the former seeing those of the latterand#151;or, the nouveau richand#151;to be tactless, lacking in taste, and following questionable cultural or social practices.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

First published in 1901, Manners for Millionaires recalls a time in Great Britain when the difference between old and new money was very realand#151;and very important. Anonymous authors Brummel and Beau, in a satirical take on the Victorian book of etiquette, offer tips for those readers aspiring to behave as the rich do. The authors set their jovial tone early in the book as they explain their intended audience: and#147;Our readers as still belong to the Pauper, Practically Pauper and Comparatively Pauper strata of societyand#151;those, we mean, with less than and#163;5000 a year and fewer than seventeen spare bedroomsand#151;will naturally feel grateful for a few introductory directions towards ameliorating their condition.and#8221; Among the other words of advice offered are: and#147;The British Museum could, after slight alteration, be recommended as a comfortable town Villa for the Season, but the stabling is indifferent.and#8221;; and#147;The Completed Capitalist will appreciate the advisability of keeping a paternal eye upon the selection of the Lady-Housemaids and the Scullion-Wenches.and#8221;; and and#147;We are unable to commend the modern ostentation of maintaining a separate private Executioner, however characteristic he might be as a hereditary relic.and#8221; There is also a chapter devoted specifically to American millionaires.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

From the same anonymous pair that brought readers Deportment for Dukes and Tips for Toffs, also published by the British Library, this humorous guide will be the perfect gift for everyoneand#8217;s favorite millionaire.

Synopsis:

and#145;The British Museum could, after slight alteration, be recommended as a comfortable town Villa for the Season, but the stabling is indifferentand#8217;

and#145;the Completed Capitalist will appreciate the advisability of keeping a paternal eye upon the selection of the Lady-Housemaids and the Scullion-Wenchesand#8217;

and#145;As the French say, if you wish to be riche you must start de nouveau.and#8217;

and#145;We are unable to commend the modern ostentation of maintaining a separate private Executioner, however characteristic he might be as a hereditary relic.and#8217;

Manners for Millionaires answers the cry for instruction and guidance from the aspiring rich: and#145;our readers as still belong to the Pauper, Practically Pauper and Comparatively Pauper strata of society and#150; those, we mean, with less than and#163;5000 a year and fewer than seventeen spare bedrooms and#150; will naturally feel grateful for a few introductory directions towards ameliorating their condition.and#8217; Following the course from penury to plenty, this book is intended to help readers ascend the staircase of Prosperity. There is also a special chapter devoted specifically to American millionaires. Originally published in 1901, this humorous guide will be equally valuable for the modern millionaire.

Synopsis:

In 1958, ad man and soon-to-be best-selling author Shepherd Mead moved to England with his family to pursue his career. Six years later, his observations on the oddities of British culture were enough to compile a satirical guidebook for fellow Americans planning to visit from across the pond. The blunders that could befall them were many. For instance, explains Mead, “Pants are always underpants and what you wear out in the open are trousers. Mistakes in this area can lead to nasty misunderstandings.”
Structured around the fictional Brash family—Peggy and Buckley Brash and their two children—the book, originally published in 1964, includes chapters on such topics as “How to Dress in England,” “The Dream House and How to Rebuild It,” and “How to Live with the Upper Classes Without Having Any Money.” Through the Brash family’s encounters with the British and their amusingly bewildered conversations as they attempt to interpret this alien way of life, Mead answers with obvious affection and quirky humor such questions as “Is England really a pest hole?” and “Do English schools create sex madness?”
 
Written with Mead’s characteristic incisive wit and illustrated with the original dynamic cartoons, How to Live Like a Lord Without Really Trying is packed with pithy advice that is equally revealing of Britain in the 1960s as its bemused American visitors.

 

About the Author

Shepherd Mead (1914–94) was an American advertising consultant and the author of the best-selling satirical guidebooks books How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and How to Succeed with Women Without Really Trying. The former was developed into a Pulitzer Prize–winning musical.

 

Table of Contents

This is not a U.S. Government Publication

A Note to British Readers

1. “Do I WANT to Live Like a Lord?”

2. How to Leave Home

3. Establish a Beach Head

4. Hotels Can Be Fun

5. How to Drive a MOW-tah-cah

6. How to Choose an Apartment

7. Now, Off to School!

8. “Do I WANT My Daughter to be a Duchess?” Part I

9. How to Dress in England

10. How to Make the Worst of the Weather

11. “Are We Really SAFE Here?”

12. Now for the Open Road!

13. Do I WANT My Daughter to be a Duchess?” Part II

14. How to Get Rich in England Part I

15. The Dream House and How to Rebuild It

16. How to Beat the Back Yard

17. How to Live with the Upper Classes without Having Any Money

18. “Do I WANT My Daughter to be a Duchess?” Part III

19. Ambulances Are for Everyone

20. How to be Ruled

21. How to Get Rich in England Part II

22. “Should We Grind the Faces of the Poor?”

23. “Is it Time to Leave”

24. “Do I WANT My Daughter to be a Duchess?” Part IV

Appendix

Sex in Britain

How to Understand British

Product Details

ISBN:
9781851242795
Author:
Mead, Shepherd
Publisher:
Bodleian Library
Author:
Brummell and Beau
Subject:
Popular Culture
Subject:
World History-England General
Subject:
General Humor
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20121031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
36 halftones
Pages:
56
Dimensions:
7.75 x 5 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Narrative
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » World History » England » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Science and Mathematics » Materials Science » General
Transportation » Nautical » General
Travel » Europe » Great Britain

How to Live Like a Lord Without Really Trying Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$25.00 In Stock
Product details 56 pages Bodleian Library - English 9781851242795 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
and#145;The British Museum could, after slight alteration, be recommended as a comfortable town Villa for the Season, but the stabling is indifferentand#8217;

and#145;the Completed Capitalist will appreciate the advisability of keeping a paternal eye upon the selection of the Lady-Housemaids and the Scullion-Wenchesand#8217;

and#145;As the French say, if you wish to be riche you must start de nouveau.and#8217;

and#145;We are unable to commend the modern ostentation of maintaining a separate private Executioner, however characteristic he might be as a hereditary relic.and#8217;

Manners for Millionaires answers the cry for instruction and guidance from the aspiring rich: and#145;our readers as still belong to the Pauper, Practically Pauper and Comparatively Pauper strata of society and#150; those, we mean, with less than and#163;5000 a year and fewer than seventeen spare bedrooms and#150; will naturally feel grateful for a few introductory directions towards ameliorating their condition.and#8217; Following the course from penury to plenty, this book is intended to help readers ascend the staircase of Prosperity. There is also a special chapter devoted specifically to American millionaires. Originally published in 1901, this humorous guide will be equally valuable for the modern millionaire.

"Synopsis" by , In 1958, ad man and soon-to-be best-selling author Shepherd Mead moved to England with his family to pursue his career. Six years later, his observations on the oddities of British culture were enough to compile a satirical guidebook for fellow Americans planning to visit from across the pond. The blunders that could befall them were many. For instance, explains Mead, “Pants are always underpants and what you wear out in the open are trousers. Mistakes in this area can lead to nasty misunderstandings.”
Structured around the fictional Brash family—Peggy and Buckley Brash and their two children—the book, originally published in 1964, includes chapters on such topics as “How to Dress in England,” “The Dream House and How to Rebuild It,” and “How to Live with the Upper Classes Without Having Any Money.” Through the Brash family’s encounters with the British and their amusingly bewildered conversations as they attempt to interpret this alien way of life, Mead answers with obvious affection and quirky humor such questions as “Is England really a pest hole?” and “Do English schools create sex madness?”
 
Written with Mead’s characteristic incisive wit and illustrated with the original dynamic cartoons, How to Live Like a Lord Without Really Trying is packed with pithy advice that is equally revealing of Britain in the 1960s as its bemused American visitors.

 

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