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The Esther Scroll

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The Esther Scroll Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A facsimile of the exquisitely illuminated 1746 Hanover Scroll of The Book of EstherThe use of scrolls dates back to ancient times, and one of the best known examples in history is the Esther scroll, or Hebrew megillah, which is devoted solely to the story of Queen Esther and is read on the feast of Purim. An uninhibitedly joyful festival, Purim celebrates the salvation of the Jews in the Persian empire of the 5th century under the rule of King Xerxes I. The word Purim is derived from the Hebrew "pur," meaning "lot," and refers to the fact that the Persian minister Haman determined by lot the time that all Jews should be destroyed. This circumstance, related in the Hebrew Bible’s Book of Esther, is publicly read out from the megillah in the synagogue at Purim.

The Esther scroll in the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Library in Hanover, dated 1746 and measuring 6.5 meters long, is a very fine and rare example and serves as the original from which TASCHEN's exacting facsimile is produced; this particular megillah is unique not only in terms of its lavish illuminations but also because it contains a contemporary German translation of the story of Esther. For many centuries, the creator of the Hanover scroll was unknown. Piecing together information from various sources, and performing his own stylistic analysis of this and other works of art from the period, author Falk Wiesemann recently made an enthralling discovery: the artist of the Hanover scroll was Wolf Leib Katz Poppers, a Jewish scribe and illustrator from Hildesheim.

TASCHEN's facsimile of the scroll is a major achievement in publishing history.

  • Limited edition facsimile scroll of 1,746 copies
  • Richly illustrated, continuous text, 6.5 m (over 21 ft) long, unfurls to the

    left from a leather-bound cylinder

  • Companion volume in a protective slipcase contains the biblical text of the Book of Esther in three languages and a fold-out sheet with an overview of all the illustrations

Synopsis:

A facsimile of the exquisitely illuminated 1746 Hanover Scroll of The Book of Esther
The use of scrolls dates back to ancient times, and one of the best known examples in history is the Esther scroll, or Hebrew megillah, which is devoted solely to the story of Queen Esther and is read on the feast of Purim. An uninhibitedly joyful festival, Purim celebrates the salvation of the Jews in the Persian empire of the 5th century under the rule of King Xerxes I. The word Purim is derived from the Hebrew "pur," meaning "lot," and refers to the fact that the Persian minister Haman determined by lot the time that all Jews should be destroyed. This circumstance, related in the Hebrew Bible’s Book of Esther, is publicly read out from the megillah in the synagogue at Purim.

TASCHEN's facsimile of the Esther scroll is a major achievement in publishing history. It is produced from a very fine and rare example of the scroll held by the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Library in Hanover, dated 1746 and measuring 6.5 meters long; this particular megillah is unique not only in terms of its lavish illuminations but also because it contains a contemporary German translation of the story of Esther. For many centuries, the creator of the Hanover scroll was unknown. Piecing together information from various sources, and performing his own stylistic analysis of this and other works of art from the period, author Falk Wiesemann recently made an enthralling discovery: the artist of the Hanover scroll was Wolf Leib Katz Poppers, a Jewish scribe and illustrator from Hildesheim.

  • Limited edition facsimile scroll of 1,746 copies
  • Richly illustrated, continuous text, 6.5 m (over 21 ft) long, unfurls to the left from a leather-bound cylinder
  • Companion volume in a protective slipcase contains the biblical text of the Book of Esther in four languages and a fold-out sheet with an overview of all the illustrations

About the Author

Falk Wiesemann studied history, German literature, political sciences and sociology at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. From 1979 to 2009 he taught at the Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf and was Professor of Modern History. He is a specialist in German-Jewish history, the history of Jewish booklore and 20th-century German social history.

Product Details

ISBN:
9783836517782
Author:
Wiessmann, Falk
Publisher:
Taschen
Subject:
General Religion
Subject:
Judaism - Sacred Writings
Edition Description:
Other (Undefined)
Publication Date:
20130531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
1
Dimensions:
13.2 x 236.2 in 20 lb

Related Subjects


Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Judaism » General
Religion » Judaism » Sacred Writings
Young Adult » General

The Esther Scroll New Hardcover
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Product details 1 pages Taschen - English 9783836517782 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
A facsimile of the exquisitely illuminated 1746 Hanover Scroll of The Book of Esther
The use of scrolls dates back to ancient times, and one of the best known examples in history is the Esther scroll, or Hebrew megillah, which is devoted solely to the story of Queen Esther and is read on the feast of Purim. An uninhibitedly joyful festival, Purim celebrates the salvation of the Jews in the Persian empire of the 5th century under the rule of King Xerxes I. The word Purim is derived from the Hebrew "pur," meaning "lot," and refers to the fact that the Persian minister Haman determined by lot the time that all Jews should be destroyed. This circumstance, related in the Hebrew Bible’s Book of Esther, is publicly read out from the megillah in the synagogue at Purim.

TASCHEN's facsimile of the Esther scroll is a major achievement in publishing history. It is produced from a very fine and rare example of the scroll held by the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Library in Hanover, dated 1746 and measuring 6.5 meters long; this particular megillah is unique not only in terms of its lavish illuminations but also because it contains a contemporary German translation of the story of Esther. For many centuries, the creator of the Hanover scroll was unknown. Piecing together information from various sources, and performing his own stylistic analysis of this and other works of art from the period, author Falk Wiesemann recently made an enthralling discovery: the artist of the Hanover scroll was Wolf Leib Katz Poppers, a Jewish scribe and illustrator from Hildesheim.

  • Limited edition facsimile scroll of 1,746 copies
  • Richly illustrated, continuous text, 6.5 m (over 21 ft) long, unfurls to the left from a leather-bound cylinder
  • Companion volume in a protective slipcase contains the biblical text of the Book of Esther in four languages and a fold-out sheet with an overview of all the illustrations

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