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When Buddhists Attack: The Curious Relationship Between Zen and the Martial Arts

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When Buddhists Attack: The Curious Relationship Between Zen and the Martial Arts Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Film, television and popular fiction have long exploited the image of the serene Buddhist monk who is master of the deadly craft of hand-to-hand combat. While these media overly romanticize the relationship between a philosophy of non-violence and the art of fighting, When Buddhists Attack: the Curious Relationship Between Zen and the Martial Arts shows this link to be nevertheless real, even natural.

Exploring the origins of Buddhism and the ethos of the Japanese samurai, university professor and martial arts practitioner Jeffrey Mann traces the close connection between the Buddhist way of compassion and the way of the warrior. This book serves as a basic introduction to the history, philosophy, and current practice of Zen as it relates to the Japanese martial arts. It examines the elements of Zen that have found a place in budo—the martial way—such as zazen, mushin, zanshin and fudoshin, then goes on to discuss the ethics and practice of budo as modern sport. Offering insights into how qualities integral to the true martial artist are interwoven with this ancient religious philosophy, this book will help practitioners reconnect to an authentic spiritual discipline of the martial arts.

Review:

"While Buddhism is famous for espousing pacifism, martial artists who draw on Zen as they practice Eastern forms of combat raise the puzzling question of how a philosophy based on ahimsa (nonharming) can influence centuries of warrior culture, particularly among the samurai of Japan. Mann, associate professor of religious studies and a longtime student of the martial arts, examines the historically tangled relationship between the practice of Zen Buddhism and the mental states cultivated by accomplished fighters in the Asian tradition. After briefly introducing Buddhism and Zen, Mann delves into the history of Zen and the martial arts in Japan; teases out the meanings of frequently used terms such as budo, bujutsu, mushin, and zanshin; argues for the benefits of practicing zazen (meditation); and examines the impact on martial arts of modern competition. He discusses the pragmatism that can lead to violence and the role of a 'virtue ethics' in Buddhism. Mann quotes from original Japanese sources and uses ancient and contemporary examples to illustrate his points. In the end, he comes to his own conclusion as to whether the practice of martial arts can be truly called Zen. This rich and accessible introduction explores one of the more complex aspects of Buddhist culture." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Film, television and popular fiction have long exploited the image of the serene Buddhist monk who is master of the deadly craft of hand-to-hand combat. While these media overly romanticize the relationship between a philosophy of non-violence and the art of fighting, When Buddhists Attack: the Curious Relationship Between Zen and the Martial Arts shows this link to be nevertheless real, even natural.

Exploring the origins of Buddhism and the ethos of the Japanese samurai, university professor and martial arts practitioner Jeffrey Mann traces the close connection between the Buddhist way of compassion and the way of the warrior. This book serves as a basic introduction to the history, philosophy, and current practice of Zen as it relates to the Japanese martial arts. It examines the elements of Zen that have found a place in budo—the martial way—such as zazen, mushin, zanshin and fudoshin, then goes on to discuss the ethics and practice of budo as modern sport. Offering insights into how qualities integral to the true martial artist are interwoven with this ancient religious philosophy, this book will help practitioners reconnect to an authentic spiritual discipline of the martial arts.

About the Author

Jeffrey K. Mann, Ph.D. is professor of world religions at Susquehanna University and has taught at Senshu University in Tokyo. A longtime student of Japanese martial arts, he holds a fourth-degree black belt from Moiro Higaonna Sensei, with whom he has trained in Okinawa. He is instructor of the Susquehanna Goju-ryu Karate-do Club, a school affiliated with the International Okinawan Goju-ryu Karate-do Federation.

Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction

The Life and Teachings of the Buddha

Zen in Buddhist Context

The Warriors' Zen—Part One: Initial Attraction

The Warriors' Zen—Part Two: An Established

Relationship

Meditation

Mushin and Mindfulness

Zen, Budo, and Ethics

The Contemporary World of Budo

Epilogue: Is it really Zen?

Product Details

ISBN:
9784805312308
Author:
Mann, Jeffrey K
Publisher:
Tuttle Publishing
Author:
Mann, Jeffrey K.
Author:
McCarthy, Patrick
Subject:
Martial Arts & Self-Defense
Subject:
Philosophy : General
Subject:
Zen
Subject:
martial arts; Zen philosophy; buddhism; Japanese martial arts; Eastern philosophy
Subject:
martial arts; Zen philosophy; buddhism; Japanese; philosophy
Edition Description:
Hardcover with Jacket
Series:
No Series
Publication Date:
20121031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
7.5 x 5 in

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Related Subjects

» Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
» Humanities » Philosophy » General
» Religion » Eastern Religions » Japanese Philosophy
» Religion » Eastern Religions » Japanese Religion and Literature
» Sports and Outdoors » Martial Arts » General
» Sports and Outdoors » Martial Arts » Philosophy
» Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Martial Arts » General

When Buddhists Attack: The Curious Relationship Between Zen and the Martial Arts New Hardcover
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$16.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Tuttle Publishing - English 9784805312308 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "While Buddhism is famous for espousing pacifism, martial artists who draw on Zen as they practice Eastern forms of combat raise the puzzling question of how a philosophy based on ahimsa (nonharming) can influence centuries of warrior culture, particularly among the samurai of Japan. Mann, associate professor of religious studies and a longtime student of the martial arts, examines the historically tangled relationship between the practice of Zen Buddhism and the mental states cultivated by accomplished fighters in the Asian tradition. After briefly introducing Buddhism and Zen, Mann delves into the history of Zen and the martial arts in Japan; teases out the meanings of frequently used terms such as budo, bujutsu, mushin, and zanshin; argues for the benefits of practicing zazen (meditation); and examines the impact on martial arts of modern competition. He discusses the pragmatism that can lead to violence and the role of a 'virtue ethics' in Buddhism. Mann quotes from original Japanese sources and uses ancient and contemporary examples to illustrate his points. In the end, he comes to his own conclusion as to whether the practice of martial arts can be truly called Zen. This rich and accessible introduction explores one of the more complex aspects of Buddhist culture." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Film, television and popular fiction have long exploited the image of the serene Buddhist monk who is master of the deadly craft of hand-to-hand combat. While these media overly romanticize the relationship between a philosophy of non-violence and the art of fighting, When Buddhists Attack: the Curious Relationship Between Zen and the Martial Arts shows this link to be nevertheless real, even natural.

Exploring the origins of Buddhism and the ethos of the Japanese samurai, university professor and martial arts practitioner Jeffrey Mann traces the close connection between the Buddhist way of compassion and the way of the warrior. This book serves as a basic introduction to the history, philosophy, and current practice of Zen as it relates to the Japanese martial arts. It examines the elements of Zen that have found a place in budo—the martial way—such as zazen, mushin, zanshin and fudoshin, then goes on to discuss the ethics and practice of budo as modern sport. Offering insights into how qualities integral to the true martial artist are interwoven with this ancient religious philosophy, this book will help practitioners reconnect to an authentic spiritual discipline of the martial arts.

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