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Beyond 9 to 5: Your Life in Time

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Beyond 9 to 5: Your Life in Time  Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


In Beyond 9 to 5, Sarah Norgate investigates the psychological, social, and cultural influences that affect the way we regard and are affected by time. Using everyday examples from around the world, her intriguing analysis unravels both the mental and biological mysteries of our relationships with time and provides a clear understanding of the links among behavior, brain, and genes.

Norgate begins by musing on the origins of our obsession with punctuality; the conflicting practices of rushing and taking things slow; economy-driven proverbs from highly industrialized nations ("Don't put off until tomorrow what you can do today")and how they differ from beliefs and attitudes in more rural areas; why some countries like Japan promote a 24/7 lifestyle while others still have trouble allowing businesses to open on Sunday; and which city moves at a faster pace, New York or Dublin? Norgate's examination of global trends yields surprising results.

Norgate then considers the biological effects of irregular hours, night shifts, cram sessions, round-the-clock consumption, and other potentially unhealthy characteristics of modern living. In addition, she looks at how our relationship with time evolves throughout our lives, from birth to old age, tracing the connection between longevity and memory and how such conditions as Parkinson's disease, addiction, sensory impairment, and autism change our perception of time.

Norgate concludes by uniting these threads to better understand the universality of our temporal landscapes. An engaging mix of cultural reference and research, Beyond 9 to 5 is a compelling look at what makes us human.

Review:

"How do 'clock time cultures' differ from 'event time cultures'? What are the psychological and physiological effects of a highly scheduled lifestyle? And given the growing phenomenon of the '24-hour economy' with its 'anytime' attitude to work and consumption, how is our changing relationship to time altering our light-dark and activity-rest cycles? Drawing on the latest statistics, Norgate, a lecturer in psychology in the faculty of health and social care at the University of Salford, England, addresses these questions and more as she surveys various cultural attitudes to time and explores the impact of such attitudes on world health and societymost disturbingly when surveying the long hours worked by children in certain parts of the developing world. In addition to exploring patterns of daily activity, Norgate examines the significance for our relationship to time of genes and lifestyle, longevity and attitudes to childbearing and life span, comparing how generation gaps across the world differ and analyzing world inequalities in average life expectancy. With a humorous touch, she also explores the notoriously irregular sleep and wake cycles of babies (cycles she traces back to the fetal environment). Rich in intelligently contrasted and contextualized data, Norgate's academic study skillfully captures how world communities differ in their relationship to time." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"How do 'clock time cultures' differ from 'event time cultures'? What are the psychological and physiological effects of a highly scheduled lifestyle? And given the growing phenomenon of the '24-hour economy' with its 'anytime' attitude to work and consumption, how is our changing relationship to time altering our light-dark and activity-rest cycles? Drawing on the latest statistics, Norgate, a lecturer in psychology in the faculty of health and social care at the University of Salford, England, addresses these questions and more as she surveys various cultural attitudes to time and explores the impact of such attitudes on world health and society — most disturbingly when surveying the long hours worked by children in certain parts of the developing world. In addition to exploring patterns of daily activity, Norgate examines the significance for our relationship to time of genes and lifestyle, longevity and attitudes to childbearing and life span, comparing how generation gaps across the world differ and analyzing world inequalities in average life expectancy. With a humorous touch, she also explores the notoriously irregular sleep and wake cycles of babies (cycles she traces back to the fetal environment). Rich in intelligently contrasted and contextualized data, Norgate's academic study skillfully captures how world communities differ in their relationship to time." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Weighing psychological, social, biological, and cultural influences, Norgate takes us on a global journey exploring the ways that individuals regard time and are affected by it." Booklist

Review:

"Sarah Norgate investigates everything from how we perceive time , to how long we've got on Earth to enjoy it, and why babies don't get to grips with it for quite a while...raises some interesting questions." New Scientist

About the Author

Sarah Norgate was born in Portsmouth in 1970 and gained her doctorate in Psychology from the University of Warwick. She is a Lecturer in Psychology in the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the University of Salford. In 2004, she was awarded a Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Fellowship to allow her to study the psychosocial practices used in the care of children diagnosed with eye cancer at Los Angeles Children's Hospital, Toronto Hospital for Sick Children and L'Institut Curie, Paris.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780231140089
Author:
Norgate, Sarah
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Subject:
Psychological aspects
Subject:
Time
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Time -- Psychological aspects.
Copyright:
Series:
Maps of the Mind
Publication Date:
November 2006
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
182
Dimensions:
9.20x7.44x.74 in. 1.12 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » General

Beyond 9 to 5: Your Life in Time Sale Hardcover
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Product details 182 pages Columbia University Press - English 9780231140089 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "How do 'clock time cultures' differ from 'event time cultures'? What are the psychological and physiological effects of a highly scheduled lifestyle? And given the growing phenomenon of the '24-hour economy' with its 'anytime' attitude to work and consumption, how is our changing relationship to time altering our light-dark and activity-rest cycles? Drawing on the latest statistics, Norgate, a lecturer in psychology in the faculty of health and social care at the University of Salford, England, addresses these questions and more as she surveys various cultural attitudes to time and explores the impact of such attitudes on world health and societymost disturbingly when surveying the long hours worked by children in certain parts of the developing world. In addition to exploring patterns of daily activity, Norgate examines the significance for our relationship to time of genes and lifestyle, longevity and attitudes to childbearing and life span, comparing how generation gaps across the world differ and analyzing world inequalities in average life expectancy. With a humorous touch, she also explores the notoriously irregular sleep and wake cycles of babies (cycles she traces back to the fetal environment). Rich in intelligently contrasted and contextualized data, Norgate's academic study skillfully captures how world communities differ in their relationship to time." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "How do 'clock time cultures' differ from 'event time cultures'? What are the psychological and physiological effects of a highly scheduled lifestyle? And given the growing phenomenon of the '24-hour economy' with its 'anytime' attitude to work and consumption, how is our changing relationship to time altering our light-dark and activity-rest cycles? Drawing on the latest statistics, Norgate, a lecturer in psychology in the faculty of health and social care at the University of Salford, England, addresses these questions and more as she surveys various cultural attitudes to time and explores the impact of such attitudes on world health and society — most disturbingly when surveying the long hours worked by children in certain parts of the developing world. In addition to exploring patterns of daily activity, Norgate examines the significance for our relationship to time of genes and lifestyle, longevity and attitudes to childbearing and life span, comparing how generation gaps across the world differ and analyzing world inequalities in average life expectancy. With a humorous touch, she also explores the notoriously irregular sleep and wake cycles of babies (cycles she traces back to the fetal environment). Rich in intelligently contrasted and contextualized data, Norgate's academic study skillfully captures how world communities differ in their relationship to time." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Weighing psychological, social, biological, and cultural influences, Norgate takes us on a global journey exploring the ways that individuals regard time and are affected by it."
"Review" by , "Sarah Norgate investigates everything from how we perceive time , to how long we've got on Earth to enjoy it, and why babies don't get to grips with it for quite a while...raises some interesting questions."
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