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China in Ten Words

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China in Ten Words Cover

ISBN13: 9780307379351
ISBN10: 0307379353
Condition:
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From one of China’s most acclaimed writers, his first work of nonfiction to appear in English: a unique, intimate look at the Chinese experience over the last several decades, told through personal stories and astute analysis that sharply illuminate the country’s meteoric economic and social transformation.

 

Framed by ten phrases common in the Chinese vernacular—“people,” “leader,” “reading,” “writing,” “Lu Xun” (one of the most influential Chinese writers of the twentieth century), “disparity,” “revolution,” “grassroots,” “copycat,” and “bamboozle”—China in Ten Words reveals as never before the world’s most populous yet oft-misunderstood nation. In “Disparity,” for example, Yu Hua illustrates the mind-boggling economic gaps that separate citizens of the country. In “Copycat,” he depicts the escalating trend of piracy and imitation as a creative new form of revolutionary action. And in “Bamboozle,” he describes the increasingly brazen practices of trickery, fraud, and chicanery that are, he suggests, becoming a way of life at every level of society.

 

Characterized by Yu Hua’s trademark wit, insight, and courage, China in Ten Words is a refreshingly candid vision of the “Chinese miracle” and all its consequences, from the singularly invaluable perspective of a writer living in China today.

Review:

"In these moving and elegantly crafted essays organized around 10 common terms from the Chinese vernacular, internationally acclaimed novelist Yu (To Live) looks back on his childhood during the Cultural Revolution and examines how China has changed in the decades since. Yu's first work of nonfiction translated into English, the book offers rare insight into the cause and effect of China's 'economic miracle,' focusing close attention on the citizens of the world's most populous country. With an intimate tone and witty prose, Yu looks at the 'effects that seem so glorious and search for their causes, whatever discomfort that may entail,' training his incisive eye on the quotidian as well as the grand. Chapters such as 'People,' 'Leader,' 'Disparity,' 'Grassroots' and 'Revolution' weave memoir and commentary with a clear-eyed economic, sociological, and political appraisal, taking on poverty and oppression on the small and large scale. 'Writing,' 'Lu Xun,' 'copy cat,' and 'bamboozle' examine Chinese cultural realities, past and present, extrapolating truths about growing up, family, friendship, sexuality, literature, and morality. Yu's book describes his particular experience, but hints at something much more expansive. As he writes in 'Reading,' 'If literature truly possesses a mysterious power, I think perhaps it is precisely this: that one can read a book by a writer of a different... culture and there encounter a sensation that is one's very own.' (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

US

About the Author

Yu Hua is the author of four novels, six collections of stories, and three collections of essays. His work has been translated into more than twenty languages. In 2002, he became the first Chinese writer to win the James Joyce Award. His novel Brothers was short-listed for the Man Asian Literary Prize and awarded France’s Prix Courrier International. To Live was awarded Italy’s Premio Grinzane Cavour, and To Live and Chronicle of a Blood Merchant were ranked among the ten most influential books in China in the 1990’s by Wen Hui Bao, the largest newspaper in Shanghai. Yu Hua lives in Beijing.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

laogongtutu, January 19, 2012 (view all comments by laogongtutu)
Since I married my wife in Chengdu, Sichuan, China in February 3, 2005 I have visited China 6 times, never for less than a month or more. I have also traveled to some of the different areas in Yunnan, Guandong,Hainan and my wife's home province, Sichuan. I have also become fascinated with the history, culture, and especially the modern literature written since reform and opening began. I have always considered Yu Hua as China's most intelligent, moving, and at times hilariously comic authors. This book uses 10 words to illustrate the changes since his boyhood as the Cultural Revolution began. Chinese is such a rich source of meanings that seems to bring out the peoples ability to say so much often in few words, and it's many opportunities for word play as the same word in the pinyin system can have many different meanings with only the 4 tonal choices used in putonghua, or the common Mandarin that is the official language of China to distinguish different meanings. Equally important is the context in which it is used, much more important than in English language. He uses this unique approach to explain the changes the last 30 years or more have brought to China, and also gives insight in how this allows people whose speech rights are restricted to express their often critical, or disparaging opinions of officials, the CCP, and China's people themselves. A fascinating book of essays that should interest anyone in exploring his fiction that has been released in English such as "Brothers", "To Live", and "Chronicles of a Blood Merchant". He deserves to be China's first resident winner of the Nobel prize for literature and this is one of the best non-fiction books on China I have read.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780307379351
Author:
Yu, Hua
Publisher:
Pantheon
Author:
Hua, Yu
Author:
Barr, Allan H.
Author:
Yu, Hua
Subject:
China
Subject:
World History - China
Subject:
Literary
Publication Date:
20111108
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.52 x 5.77 x 0.94 in 1 lb

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Related Subjects

» Featured Titles » History and Social Science
» History and Social Science » Asia » China » General
» History and Social Science » Asia » China » Peoples Republic 1949 to Present
» History and Social Science » Sale Books
» History and Social Science » Sociology » Regional Studies
» History and Social Science » World History » China
» History and Social Science » World History » General

China in Ten Words Sale Hardcover
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$10.98 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780307379351 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In these moving and elegantly crafted essays organized around 10 common terms from the Chinese vernacular, internationally acclaimed novelist Yu (To Live) looks back on his childhood during the Cultural Revolution and examines how China has changed in the decades since. Yu's first work of nonfiction translated into English, the book offers rare insight into the cause and effect of China's 'economic miracle,' focusing close attention on the citizens of the world's most populous country. With an intimate tone and witty prose, Yu looks at the 'effects that seem so glorious and search for their causes, whatever discomfort that may entail,' training his incisive eye on the quotidian as well as the grand. Chapters such as 'People,' 'Leader,' 'Disparity,' 'Grassroots' and 'Revolution' weave memoir and commentary with a clear-eyed economic, sociological, and political appraisal, taking on poverty and oppression on the small and large scale. 'Writing,' 'Lu Xun,' 'copy cat,' and 'bamboozle' examine Chinese cultural realities, past and present, extrapolating truths about growing up, family, friendship, sexuality, literature, and morality. Yu's book describes his particular experience, but hints at something much more expansive. As he writes in 'Reading,' 'If literature truly possesses a mysterious power, I think perhaps it is precisely this: that one can read a book by a writer of a different... culture and there encounter a sensation that is one's very own.' (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , US
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