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The Complete Chronicles of Narnia

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The Complete Chronicles of Narnia Cover

ISBN13: 9780060281373
ISBN10: 0060281375
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter OneThe Wrong DoorThis is a story about something that happened long ago when your grandfather was a child. It is a very important story because it shows how all the comings and goings between our own world and the land of Narnia first began.In those days Mr. Sherlock Holmes was still living in Baker Street and the Bastables were looking for treasure in the Lewisham Road. In those days, if you were a boy you had to wear a stiff Eton collar every day, and schools were usually nastier than now. But meals were nicer, and as for sweets, I won't tell you how cheap and good they were, because it would only make your mouth water in vain. And in those days there lived in London a girl called Polly Plummer.She lived in one of a long row of houses which were all joined together. One morning she was out in the back garden when a boy scrambled up from the garden next door and put his face over the wall.Polly was very surprised because up till now there had never been any children in that house, but only Mr. Ketterley and Miss Ketterley, a brother and sister, old bachelor and old maid, living together. So she looked up, full of curiosity. The face of the strange boy was very grubby. It could hardly have been grubbier if he had first rubbed his hands in the earth, and then had a good cry, and then dried his face with his hands. As a matter of fact, this was very nearly what he had been doing."Hullo," said Polly."Hullo," said the boy. "What's your name?""Polly," said Polly. "What's yours?""Digory," said the boy."I say, what a funny name!" said Polly."It isn't half so funny as Polly," said Digory."Yes it is," said Polly."No, it isn't," said Digory."At any rate I "do wash my face," said Polly."Which is what you need to do; especially after --" and then she stopped. She had been going to say "After you've been blubbing," but she thought that wouldn't be polite."All right, I have then," said Digory in a much louder voice, like a boy who was so miserable that he didn't care who knew he had been crying. "And so would you," he went on, "if you'd lived all your life in the country and had a pony, and a river at the bottom of the garden, and then been brought to live in a beastly Hole like this.""London isn't a Hole," said Polly indignantly. But the boy was too wound up to take any notice of her, and he went on --"And if your father was away in India — and you had to come and live with an aunt and an uncle who's mad (who would like that?) — and if the reason was that they were looking after your Mother — and if your Mother was ill and was going to — going to — die." Then his face went the wrong sort of shape as it does if you're trying to keep back your tears."I didn't know. I'm sorry," said Polly humbly. And then, because she hardly knew what to say, and also to turn Digory's mind to cheerful subjects, she asked: "Is Mr. Ketterley really mad?""Well, either he's mad," said Digory, "or there's some other mystery. He has a study on the top floor and Aunt Letty says I must never go up there. Well, that looks fishy to begin with. And then there's another thing. Whenever he tries to say anything to me at meal times — he never even tries to talk to "her — she always shuts him up. She says, 'Don't worry the boy, Andrew' or 'I'm sure Digory doesn't want to hear about "that, ' or else, 'Now, Digory, wouldn't you like to go out and play in the garden?'""What sort of things does he tryto say?""I don't know. He never gets far enough. But there's more than that. One night — it was last night in fact — as I was going past the foot of the attic-stairs on my way to bed (and I don't much care for going past them either) I'm sure I heard a yell.""Perhaps he keeps a mad wife shut up there.""Yes, I've thought of that.""Or perhaps he's a coiner.""Or he might have been a pirate, like the man at the beginning of "Treasure Island, and be always hiding from his old shipmates.""How exciting!" said Polly. "I never knew your house was so interesting.""You may think it interesting," said Digory. "But you wouldn't like it if you had to sleep there. How would you like to lie awake listening for Uncle Andrew's step to come creeping along the passage to your room? And he has such awful eyes. "That was how Polly and Digory got to know one another: and as it was just the beginning of the summer holidays and neither of them was going to the sea that year, they met nearly every day.Their adventures began chiefly because it was one of the wettest and coldest summers there had been for years. That drove them to do indoor things: you might say, indoor exploration. It is wonderful how much exploring you can do with a stump of candle in a big house, or in a row of houses. Polly had discovered long ago that if you opened a certain little door in the box-room attic of her house you would find the cistern and a dark place behind it which you could get into by a little careful climbing. The dark place was like a long tunnel with brick wall on one side and sloping roof on the other. In the roof...

Synopsis:

All seven tales in The Chronicles of Narnia are bound together, with full-color illustrations, in one magnificent hardcover volume with a personal introduction by Douglas Gresham, stepson of C. S. Lewis.

Talking beasts, waking trees, heroic deeds, and epic battles between good and evil await you in C. S. Lewis's classic fantasy series, which has been enchanting readers for over sixty years.

This edition presents the seven books—The Magician's Nephew; The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; The Horse and His Boy; Prince Caspian; The Voyage of the Dawn Treader; The Silver Chair; and The Last Battle—unabridged and arranged in C. S. Lewis's preferred order, featuring full-color artwork by the original illustrator, Pauline Baynes.

Synopsis:

The Chronicles of Narnia have enchanted millions of readers over the last fifty years, and the magical events described in C. S. Lewis's immortal prose have left many a lasting memory. For here is a world where a witch decrees eternal winter; where there are more talking animals than people; and where battles are fought by Centaurs, Giants, and Fauns. <BR> Now all seven Chronicles are bound together in this one magnificent volume with a personal introduction by Douglas Gresham, stepson of C. S. Lewis. Pauline Baynes' original and much-loved illustrations have been made even more memorable by the addition of color. This spectacular gift edition will guarantee that C. S. Lewis's timeless world of Narnia will catch the imagination of yet another generation of readers.

About the Author

Clive Staples Lewis, was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1898. As a child, he was fascinated by the fairy tales, myths, and ancient legends recounted to him by his Irish nurse. The image of a faun carrying parcels and an umbrella in a snowy wood came to him when he was sixteen. Many years later, the faun was joined by an evil queen and a magnificient lion. Their story became The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe.Six further Chronicles of Narniafollowed, and the final title, The Last Battle,was awarded the United Kingdom's prestigious Carnegie Award.

Lewis was Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Magdalen College, Oxford, and later was Professor of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, where he remained until his death in 1963. He wrote numerous books of literary criticism and on Christianity, the best-knowing being The Screwtape Letters,as well as four novels for adults. The seven books of The Chronicles of Narniawere his only works for children.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

acovello, December 23, 2007 (view all comments by acovello)
No matter what age you are, you cannot help being totally taken in by this series. These are more than fairytales or myths, these are uplifting sagas that can give you hope and joy when you need it the most. Good and evil, hope and despair, fantasy and reality, and, the knowledge that the just will prevail will keep you wanting more. I put off reading "The Last Battle" for months because I didn't want it tio end.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780060281373
Author:
Baynes, Pauline
Author:
Baynes, Pauline
Author:
Lewis, C.S.
Author:
by C. S. Lewis and Pauline Baynes
Publisher:
HarperCollins
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Christian Life
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Action & Adventure
Subject:
Children
Subject:
Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Magic
Subject:
Fantastic fiction
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Literature - Classics / Contemporary
Subject:
Good and evil
Subject:
Fantasy
Subject:
Fantasy fiction
Subject:
Children -- Juvenile fiction.
Subject:
Action & Adventure - General
Subject:
Fantasy & Magic
Subject:
Childrens classics
Edition Number:
1st American ed.
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Chronicles of Narnia
Series Volume:
824
Publication Date:
19980918
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 3
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
528
Dimensions:
7.625 x 5.125 in 6.99 oz
Age Level:
08-12

Related Subjects

Children's » Classics » General
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Science Fiction and Fantasy » General

The Complete Chronicles of Narnia
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 528 pages HarperCollins Publishers - English 9780060281373 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , All seven tales in The Chronicles of Narnia are bound together, with full-color illustrations, in one magnificent hardcover volume with a personal introduction by Douglas Gresham, stepson of C. S. Lewis.

Talking beasts, waking trees, heroic deeds, and epic battles between good and evil await you in C. S. Lewis's classic fantasy series, which has been enchanting readers for over sixty years.

This edition presents the seven books&#8212;The Magician's Nephew; The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; The Horse and His Boy; Prince Caspian; The Voyage of the Dawn Treader; The Silver Chair; and The Last Battle&#8212;unabridged and arranged in C. S. Lewis's preferred order, featuring full-color artwork by the original illustrator, Pauline Baynes.

"Synopsis" by , The Chronicles of Narnia have enchanted millions of readers over the last fifty years, and the magical events described in C. S. Lewis's immortal prose have left many a lasting memory. For here is a world where a witch decrees eternal winter; where there are more talking animals than people; and where battles are fought by Centaurs, Giants, and Fauns. <BR> Now all seven Chronicles are bound together in this one magnificent volume with a personal introduction by Douglas Gresham, stepson of C. S. Lewis. Pauline Baynes' original and much-loved illustrations have been made even more memorable by the addition of color. This spectacular gift edition will guarantee that C. S. Lewis's timeless world of Narnia will catch the imagination of yet another generation of readers.

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