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1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

This title in other editions

A Ticket to Ride

by

A Ticket to Ride Cover

ISBN13: 9780061340512
ISBN10: 0061340510
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Remember that girl? The one who was impossibly cool, who taught you how to blow smoke rings, cut school, sneak out of the house? Remember how you turned yourself inside out trying to be just like her—and then she broke your heart?

Set in the long, hot summer of 1973, Paula McLains lyrical debut novel explores what happens when an insecure, motherless teenager falls under the dangerous spell of "that girl"—her older cousin Fawn. Fawns worldly ways are mesmerizing to Jamie, who submits to a makeover—both inside and out—to win Fawns approval. But over the course of a summer wrecked with tragedy and loss, Jamie learns that Fawn will use anything and anyone to further her own motives. When a local girl goes missing, Jamie realizes how dangerous Fawn truly is, and recognizes, too late, her own complicity in the disaster that unfolds around them.

Paula McLains poignant debut is a compelling family portrait that explores the darker sides of love and loyalty.

Review:

"The summer of 1973 in Moline, Ill., is enlivened and permanently marked for 15-year-old Jamie by the arrival of her charismatic, seen-it-all cousin, Fawn Delacorte, in McLain's sure-handed if familiar debut novel (after the memoir Like Family). Abandoned by her parents as a baby, Jamie is a lonely, nave teenager from Bakersfield, Calif., sent to live with her uncle Raymond after her grandmother falls sick. She falls under Dawn's spell and embraces the dissolute life of layabout teenagers, brushing ever closer to the inevitable tragedy to come. McLain alternates her vivid first-person account of Jamie's initially glorious summer with Raymond's recollections of his fraught relationship with Suzette, his younger sister and Jamie's mother. The echoes between past and present, Jamie and Suzette, and between Suzette and Fawn ring ever louder as the novel progresses, and protectors clash with those they vainly try to protect. McLain has a good ear for the dialogue of hormonally crazed, unpredictable teenagers. But 1970s childhoods are well-trod literary territory, and it feels as if this tale has already been told." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

McLains debut novel, set in the summer of 1973, tells the story of an insecure and motherless teenager who falls under the dangerous spell of her older cousin.

About the Author

Paula McLain received an MFA in poetry from the University of Michigan, and has been a resident of Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. She is the author of two collections of poetry and a memoir, and lives in Cleveland with her family.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

lori_crossroads, April 15, 2008 (view all comments by lori_crossroads)
I cried both times I came to the achingly sad and hopeful end of Paula McLain’s book, where all the beautiful threads of desire and loss, spun out in her lyric voice, were woven together in the simple sentence, “Was there anything sadder than starting your life?” Her characters make my heart ache, for they represent so deeply what is flawed and ragged about all of us.
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threefab, April 15, 2008 (view all comments by threefab)
I found Paula McLain’s “A Ticket to Ride” a great discovery, rich in detail and characterization and beautifully written. The central two relationships are intricate and compelling, and we are jarred into self-knowledge through seeing characters act in ways to which we can all too easily relate. Plus, McLain has a poet’s touch with a phrase, and for anyone who loves language, her imagery is sheer pleasure: “It was August. For years it was August.... wilting patio chairs... Dry grass scratched unreadable names into the back of our thighs... a molting feather pillow... rich housewives walking sneezing Pomeranians... Fawn had this effect on all males, no matter the species, as if she were a kind of a virus, or emitted a signal at a male-specific register.” And there’s McLain’s seemingly encyclopedic knowledge of music and period detail and the sometimes surprising: “...the BBs from his Daisy rifle raining down on the green water, skittering then sinking fast.” McLain draws us in with her total command of her material, the power of her story, and the richness of her language. Highly recommended.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780061340512
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Mclain, Paula
Author:
McLain, Paula
Author:
by Paula McLain
Publisher:
Ecco
Subject:
General
Subject:
Coming of age
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Teenage girls
Subject:
Cousins
Subject:
Identity (psychology)
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20080108
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.52x6.20x.95 in. .88 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Coming of Age

A Ticket to Ride Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Ecco - English 9780061340512 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The summer of 1973 in Moline, Ill., is enlivened and permanently marked for 15-year-old Jamie by the arrival of her charismatic, seen-it-all cousin, Fawn Delacorte, in McLain's sure-handed if familiar debut novel (after the memoir Like Family). Abandoned by her parents as a baby, Jamie is a lonely, nave teenager from Bakersfield, Calif., sent to live with her uncle Raymond after her grandmother falls sick. She falls under Dawn's spell and embraces the dissolute life of layabout teenagers, brushing ever closer to the inevitable tragedy to come. McLain alternates her vivid first-person account of Jamie's initially glorious summer with Raymond's recollections of his fraught relationship with Suzette, his younger sister and Jamie's mother. The echoes between past and present, Jamie and Suzette, and between Suzette and Fawn ring ever louder as the novel progresses, and protectors clash with those they vainly try to protect. McLain has a good ear for the dialogue of hormonally crazed, unpredictable teenagers. But 1970s childhoods are well-trod literary territory, and it feels as if this tale has already been told." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , McLains debut novel, set in the summer of 1973, tells the story of an insecure and motherless teenager who falls under the dangerous spell of her older cousin.
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