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Sense & Sensibility

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Sense & Sensibility Cover

ISBN13: 9780062200464
ISBN10: 0062200461
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Two sisters could hardly be more different . . .

Elinor Dashwood, an architecture student, values patience and reliability. Her impulsive sister, Marianne, takes after their mother, Belle, and is fiery and creative, filling the house with her dramas and guitar playing while dreaming of going to art school.

But when their father, Henry Dashwood, dies suddenly, his whole family finds itself forced out of Norland Park, their beloved home for twenty years. Without the comfort of status, they discover that their values are severely put to the test.

Can Elinor remain stoic and restrained knowing that the man she really likes has already been ensnared by another girl? Will Marianne's faith in a one-and-only lifetime love be shaken by meeting the hottest boy in the county, John Willoughby? And in a world where social media and its opinions are the controlling forces at play, can love ever triumph over conventions and disapproval?

With her wit and eye for social nuance, Joanna Trollope casts Jane Austen's Sense & Sensibility in a fresh new light to retell a wonderful coming-of-age story about young love and heartbreak, and how, when it comes to money especially, some things never change. . . .

Review:

"In this funny, well-paced Mormon-themed take on Austen's often retold classic, by romance writer Jamison (Persuasion: A Latter-day Tale), Emma is a 23-year-old receptionist in modern-day Vienna, Va., who tries to parlay her penchant for meddling and doling advice into a career as a life coach. After welcoming pretty but insecure nanny Harri into the group of 20-somethings she knows from the local Mormon community, Emma misinterprets signals from Phil Elton and attempts to pair the two off — with disastrous results. Meanwhile, former classmate Jenna Farley, now a country music star, comes home for Christmas, making Emma reflect on her own lackluster accomplishments. She's briefly distracted by the arrival of Hank Weston, who seems perfect and appears to like her. Jamison's writing is engaging and full of vivid, amusing lines; a croissant is 'the cotton candy version of bread,' for instance. Jamison's religious perspective never comes off as awkward or didactic. The author only slips toward the end, when a saccharine resolution pales compared to the riveting angst that came before it. (Aug.) Brit author Trollope brings Austen's classic into the new millennium, with mixed results. After Henry Dashwood dies, the Dashwood sisters and their mother are given a house by kindly rich relatives John and Mary Middleton, while the estate that was the Dashwood home passes to the sisters' henpecked half-brother John and his status-conscious wife Fanny. Elinor, the responsible eldest Dashwood sister, is smitten with Fanny's brother Edward Ferrars, though she hasn't heard from him since the move, and he, unbeknownst to her, has been dating the daffy Lucy Steele. Delicate, dramatic, and gorgeous, middle sister Marianne falls for eye-candy John 'Wills' Willoughby, though he treads on her heart by publicly rejecting her. All this is conveyed in formal prose with equally stiff dialogue, which makes Trollope's offhand mentions of laptops and Range Rovers somewhat jarring. And yet, Trollope's faithfulness to the tropes of this story keep her from letting the plot jibe with the modern world, though she does wink at that: 'You're like those nineteenth-century novels where marriage is the only career option for a middle-class girl.' The book's resolution for Marianne seems especially unlikely in this era, and could have benefitted from a more malleable adaptation. Agent: Joy Harris, Joy Harris Agency. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

From Joanna Trollope, one of the most insightful chroniclers of family life writing fiction today, comes a contemporary retelling of Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austens classic novel of love, money, and two very different sisters.

John Dashwood promised his dying father that he would take care of his half sisters. But his wife, Fanny, has no desire to share their newly inherited estate. When she descends upon Norland Park, the three Dashwood girls—Elinor, Marianne, and Margaret—are faced with the realities of a cold world and the cruelties of life without their father, their home, or their money.

With her sparkling wit, Joanna Trollope casts a clever, satirical eye on the tales of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood.

Reimagining Sense and Sensibility in a fresh, modern new light, she spins the novels romance, bonnets, and betrothals into a wonderfully witty coming-of-age story about the stuff that really makes the world go around. For when it comes to money, some things never change....

About the Author

Joanna Trollope, a descendant of nineteenth-century English novelist Anthony Trollope,has been widely praised for her deft, perceptive,and unflinching portrayals of relationshipsbetween men and women.Much beloved in England, she is theauthor of historical novels and a study of women inthe British Empire. The most recent of her sixcontemporary novels topped British bestseller lists.The Men and The Girls is the first to bepublished in the United States. She lives with herhusband in Gloucestershire, England.

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The Lost Entwife, November 11, 2013 (view all comments by The Lost Entwife)
When I first heard about The Austen Project (modernization of Jane Austen's works being put out by Harper) I was a bit dubious. I mean, I love Austen's books - count me amount the hordes of fans who think they are just perfect. Now, mind you there are a few books out there, like Longbourn by Jo Baker, that play with some of the characters a bit, but I enjoyed them due to their authenticity and the respect that was evident for Austen's writing. But still, I was wary about Sense & Sensibility by Joanna Trollope.

Let me tell you why. First, I knew nothing of Trollope's writing. She has an impressive resume of books, but I'd never experienced them; in fact, I'd never heard of Trollope before picking up Sense & Sensibility. Second, while Pride & Prejudice will always rank up there in my esteem of Austen's work, slowly Sense & Sensibility has been moving toward the top of that list. I think that is due to my own aging self and the appreciation I have for supremely awkward situations (Lucy, Edward, and Elinor anyone?) and also due to my absolute love of Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in the movie. If you haven't seen it, you must as soon as possible.

I was also worried that in addition to gussying up the language into a more modern sense, liberties would be taken with the story that would take some of the things I love away, like the awkwardness. Granted, I wasn't thinking along the lines of Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters - but still, there's an awful lot you can do when re-writing a classic, and I worried that the story would become juvenile.

So with those reservations said, let me talk about what I loved about Trollope's re-imagining of Sense & Sensibility. First, the relationships. While it might seem a stretch to work inheritance and incomes from Austen's day into our present day lives, it worked well. The death of the Dashwood patriarch throws Belle Dashwood and her daughters into a horrible quandary. Add into the mix, the subtle twist that Trollope gives the story in order for it to make sense that they don't inherit and you've got a good, solid base.

Trollope also incorporates little bits of technology into the story without changing the integrity of what Austen had to say. Marianne, passionate, full-of-romance, Marianne spends her time texting and emailing rather than waiting forlornly for a letter by post. Willoughby's influence on the young woman that Col. Brandon was watching out for made complete sense in today's day and age, and Elinor's desire to see her family independent and well-off also translated well.

Unfortunately, what did not translate well, was Edward. Poor Edward - in Austen's day he came off as noble; a young man willing to give up a fortune in order to do the right thing. But today, Edward simply came off as the guy who will probably end up working a minimum wage job for the rest of his life unless he can get a handout from someone with some business sense. Edward was the only disappointment I had, and I don't believe that was Trollope's fault. For the first time, I saw Edward as Jane might have seen him and I understood a bit more clearly why the scenes in the original were as awkward as they came off being. Young men, noble while they might be, were still so dependent on their mothers or aunts or grandmothers and subject to their rule, no matter how much we, in this day and age, might have thought those women powerless, they still had some iota of power. This was demonstrated well through Edward's mother, through Fanny, and through Willoughby's aunt.

I would love to do a side-by-side comparison of the original and this modernization and to examine the impact those three women had in both cases. I think it would be an interesting study and I love that Harper has chosen to do this project - I think it will not only bring some fresh new faces to the Austen scene, but will awaken new ideas in us old-timers who still love to study and admire Austen and her creations.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780062200464
Author:
Trollope, Joanna
Publisher:
HarperTorch
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Romance - General
Subject:
Romance - Contemporary
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20131031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.97 in 22.8 oz

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Sense & Sensibility Used Hardcover
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Product details 368 pages Harper - English 9780062200464 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this funny, well-paced Mormon-themed take on Austen's often retold classic, by romance writer Jamison (Persuasion: A Latter-day Tale), Emma is a 23-year-old receptionist in modern-day Vienna, Va., who tries to parlay her penchant for meddling and doling advice into a career as a life coach. After welcoming pretty but insecure nanny Harri into the group of 20-somethings she knows from the local Mormon community, Emma misinterprets signals from Phil Elton and attempts to pair the two off — with disastrous results. Meanwhile, former classmate Jenna Farley, now a country music star, comes home for Christmas, making Emma reflect on her own lackluster accomplishments. She's briefly distracted by the arrival of Hank Weston, who seems perfect and appears to like her. Jamison's writing is engaging and full of vivid, amusing lines; a croissant is 'the cotton candy version of bread,' for instance. Jamison's religious perspective never comes off as awkward or didactic. The author only slips toward the end, when a saccharine resolution pales compared to the riveting angst that came before it. (Aug.) Brit author Trollope brings Austen's classic into the new millennium, with mixed results. After Henry Dashwood dies, the Dashwood sisters and their mother are given a house by kindly rich relatives John and Mary Middleton, while the estate that was the Dashwood home passes to the sisters' henpecked half-brother John and his status-conscious wife Fanny. Elinor, the responsible eldest Dashwood sister, is smitten with Fanny's brother Edward Ferrars, though she hasn't heard from him since the move, and he, unbeknownst to her, has been dating the daffy Lucy Steele. Delicate, dramatic, and gorgeous, middle sister Marianne falls for eye-candy John 'Wills' Willoughby, though he treads on her heart by publicly rejecting her. All this is conveyed in formal prose with equally stiff dialogue, which makes Trollope's offhand mentions of laptops and Range Rovers somewhat jarring. And yet, Trollope's faithfulness to the tropes of this story keep her from letting the plot jibe with the modern world, though she does wink at that: 'You're like those nineteenth-century novels where marriage is the only career option for a middle-class girl.' The book's resolution for Marianne seems especially unlikely in this era, and could have benefitted from a more malleable adaptation. Agent: Joy Harris, Joy Harris Agency. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , From Joanna Trollope, one of the most insightful chroniclers of family life writing fiction today, comes a contemporary retelling of Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austens classic novel of love, money, and two very different sisters.

John Dashwood promised his dying father that he would take care of his half sisters. But his wife, Fanny, has no desire to share their newly inherited estate. When she descends upon Norland Park, the three Dashwood girls—Elinor, Marianne, and Margaret—are faced with the realities of a cold world and the cruelties of life without their father, their home, or their money.

With her sparkling wit, Joanna Trollope casts a clever, satirical eye on the tales of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood.

Reimagining Sense and Sensibility in a fresh, modern new light, she spins the novels romance, bonnets, and betrothals into a wonderfully witty coming-of-age story about the stuff that really makes the world go around. For when it comes to money, some things never change....

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