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    Original Essays | July 14, 2015

    Joshua Mohr: IMG Your Imagination, Your Fingerprint



    When I was in grad school, a teacher told our workshop that if a published novel is 300 pages, the writer had to generate 1,200 along the way. I... Continue »
    1. $17.50 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      All This Life

      Joshua Mohr 9781593766030

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December

by

December Cover

 

 

Excerpt

One

Saturday

Wilsons got his arm deep in the twisted mess of wires, pipes, and tubing that festers there beneath his trucks dented hood like the intestines of some living thing. He gropes at the undersides of things, trying to find whatever leaking crack it is thats caused him now to fail inspection twice. That and the broken hinge of the drivers seat, which he keeps upright by stacking milk crates behind it.

“Damn truck,” he mutters. “Goddamn.” He says it though he loves this truck, he wouldnt ever trade it in. It keeps him busy on the weekends; its a project, a chore.

Today is Wilsons birthday. He looks younger than his forty-two years, and in many ways he feels it. He feels the same as he always has, all his life, same as he did as a kid stalking through the woods with a BB gun or a young man drunk at a keg party, and so sometimes he doesnt recognize the city businessman hes become, with a weekend house in the country, a wife, a child who breaks his heart. Hed always thought by the time he got to somewhere around forty-two hed be ready to accept stiffening joints and graying hair, wrinkles and cholesterol pills, but when these things apply to him he feels as if theres been some mistake; hes not quite ready for them yet.

He pulls his arm out from under the trucks hood and starts to wipe the grease from his hand onto the rag hes taken from the bag of them in the hall closet: old clothing ripped into neat squares. He stares absently at the trucks engine as he rubs the rag over his fingers one by one, then he shuts the hood. Hell have to take the thing in to the shop, he thinks; hes no mechanic. A breeze chills him, and he looks at the sky. The clouds are low and rolling. Fall leaves ride the air, and he imagines gulls at the nearby shore coasting the wind. Late autumn always fills him with something like fear, or dread, or sadness; hes never sure how to label the feeling. Its an awareness of the inevitable impending dark, barren cold of winter, which when it comes is fine, he knows, and eventually ends. Still, he shudders.

Firewood, he thinks. He should chop some firewood. Hes bought a new rack to store it on outside this winter, with a tarp attached to keep it dry; he assembled it last weekend, and now it needs filling. He should bring some wood inside, too; its getting cold enough for a fire, and Isabelle loves a fire. Shell sit in front of one for hours, reading, or drawing, or staring at the flames, rotating her body when one side gets too hot. Like a chicken on a spit, he once said, which made her laugh.

He walks to the garage for an ax. He tosses the dirty rag hes holding into the trash can, which is nearly overflowing with cardboard, Styrofoam, wood scraps, newspapers, empty paint cans and oil bottles, and other rags like this one. He stares at the newest rag and tilts his head in recognition. The rag is flannel, printed with purple alligators. Its from a nightgown he brought back years ago for Isabelle, from a business trip to where? Spain, or maybe Portugal that time; he cant remember. But he does remember buying it, calling Ruth back in the States to make sure that he bought the right size, and the right size slippers to match.

He takes the rag from the trash can and holds it in his hand. He considers folding it up, tucking it away somewhere, but then he sees no point in that. He hesitates a second more, then tosses it back into the can, lifts his ax, and goes outside.

...

Ruth stands over the kitchen sink peeling carrots. “I thought Id make split pea,” she says. “A huge vat of it that we can keep frozen and warm up, you know, on those Friday nights when we get here and its late and cold and the furnace is out or the pipes are frozen. I feel like that happens more and more each winter, but wouldnt it be nice to have a warm bowl of soup? That and a fire, if your father ever gets around to chopping wood.” She puts the last peeled carrot down onto the pile of them stacked on the cutting board and watches the skin spin down the drain as she runs the disposal.

“You know,” she says, chopping the carrots into coins, “your uncle called this morning. Hes convinced hes under surveillance. Hes being buzzed by black helicopters. Hes counted thirty-six since yesterday.” She wipes the hair from her forehead with the back of her wrist. “And,” she says, “he thinks Ronnas mind is being poisoned.” Ruth looks up. “Because she uses aspartame, not sugar.” She pushes the carrot coins to the side of the cutting board and reaches for an onion.

The kitchen opens onto the family room, the rooms themselves separated only by the wide counter where Ruth stands. She looks up over the counter and into the other room, where her daughter sits at the table, her head bent low over her sketchbook, a pencil clutched firmly in her hand. She looks stern with concentration, and Ruth can tell by the whiteness of her fingertips that she is pressing the pencil hard against the page. She is framed by the picture window, and her silhouette is dark against the sky behind her, its steely canvas broken only by the jagged limbs of the apple tree, Ruths favorite. Bare long before the other trees this fall, the apple tree is dying, Ruth knows. Wilson wanted to cut it down, but she wouldnt let him.

“Its dead, Ruth,” hed said.

“Its not dead,” shed said. “Its dying. Lets just let it die.”

The winter will kill it, she suspects. Its meant to be a bad one.

“Do you know what my mother said to me on her deathbed?” Ruth asks, flaking the onions skin away. “I asked her, I said, ‘Mother, what am I going to do about Jimmy? And she looked at me, and she smiled, and she said, ‘Ruthie, I dont know, but he is your problem now. And, my God, words have never been truer.” She picks the knife back up and holds it above the onion, then she pauses. “Im just not quite sure what Im supposed to do.” She lowers the knife onto the onion. “What do I say about thirty-six black helicopters, for instance? Do I say I see them, too? That everyone does? Or do I tell him hes delusional?”

Ruth steps back from the onion to dry her eyes. Isabelle has not looked up. A large pot of water on the stove has finally come to a boil, and Ruth pours several bags of split peas in. “There,” she says. “That should last us for a couple months at least. Maybe even all winter. Though Id like to make lentil, too, at some point.” She turns back to the cutting board. Her daughter hunches over her sketchbook, very still except for the slow and deliberate movements of her drawing hand.

“Id like to see what youre drawing, Isabelle,” Ruth says. “When youre finished, if you want to show me.”

Her daughter says nothing, though Ruth didnt expect an answer. Isabelle hasnt spoken for nine months now. She has been to countless doctors and psychiatrists, but nothing seems to help, to penetrate the silence. Ruth is sure that she is somehow responsible. There are images that haunt and tease: Isabelle at two, sitting alone on the edge of the sandbox in the same blue overalls every day, watching as the other children play; Isabelle at four, sitting small among her preschool classmates, glancing often at Ruth with her book in the corner to make sure she hasnt left her there alone; Isabelle in tears on her first day of kindergarten when finally Ruth arrived to pick her up, ten minutes late. Isabelle had taken literally her teachers joking threat to turn the stragglers into chicken soup, and she had nightmares for months. Of all days, on that day, Ruth should have been on time. And maybe she shouldnt have stayed with her daughter at preschool, the only parent, until April, when Isabelle was finally ready to let her go. Maybe she should have gotten into the sandbox with her daughter and helped her to make friends instead of allowing her to sit as a spectator until she was comfortable. Shes read countless books on parenting, trying to figure out just where she went wrong, and how she can make it right. Each book tells her something different: she should discipline, she should tolerate, she should encourage independence, she should allow for dependence—and each book points to a mistake. Where she should have tolerated, she disciplined instead; where she should have disciplined, she didnt.

She lifts the cutting knife and begins to chop the second onion. She hears the back door whine open and waits to hear it close; it doesnt. “Shut the door!” she yells. “Youre letting out the heat!”

Wilson appears in the kitchen door with a bundle of firewood in his arms. “What are you making?” he asks.

“Split pea. Could you please close the door behind you when you come inside?”

“My arms are full. And Im going right back out,” he says, passing through the kitchen into the family room. “Im going to bring another load in.”

“Yes, well, in the meantime I can already feel the draft.”

Ruth sets her knife down and goes to shut the door herself. When she comes back into the kitchen, she sees Wilson crouched at the hearth, building a fire. “Its fire season, Belle,” hes saying. “I thought you might like a fire. Doesnt that sound good?”

Isabelle doesnt look up from her drawing. Ruth watches as Wilson balls up newspaper to set beneath the logs. “Dont forget to open the flue,” she says.

Wilson says nothing. When the wood catches flame and a steady fire is going, he stands up and takes a step backward.

“Its nice to have a fire,” Ruth says. “Thank you.”

Wilson brushes his hands off on his thighs. “Im going to bring a few more loads in,” he says.

“Why dont you sit down?” Ruth says. “Why dont you relax, read the paper or something? Its the weekend. Its your birthday. We dont need more wood right now.”

“Might as well, while Im at it,” Wilson says. “And I need to get the logs I just cut under the tarp before it starts to rain.” He looks out the window. “It looks like it just might rain.”

“Maybe snow,” Ruth says. “Wouldnt that be exciting? Maybe if it snows you could even sled tomorrow, Isabelle.”

“Or we could build a snow fort. Remember that one last year?” Wilson says, going over to stand by his daughters side. Isabelle slides her hand over the drawing. Wilsons face goes slack. “Sorry,” he says quickly. “Im not looking.” He ruffles his daughters hair and hurries through the kitchen for the door.

“Wil,” Ruth calls after him. He turns in the kitchen doorway, his face red, whether with cold from outside or heat from the fire or something else Ruth cant be sure. “I made reservations at Luigis. For seven oclock.”

Wilson nods and smiles stiffly. “Great,” he says. “Sounds good.”

...

If it does anything, it will snow. Even with the gloves he wears for handling firewood, Wilsons fingers have gone numb. He throws the last of the wood onto the rack and covers the pile with the tarp. He straightens up, pauses to catch his breath. Across the street and down aways, he can make out a moving truck beeping its way backward down the driveway toward Mr. Sullivans old house. He sniffs, takes the ax from where hes rested it against the side of the house, and brings it into the garage where it belongs.

The garage is a mess. There are boxes of who knows what stacked ceiling high and piles of other clutter: garden hose, sprinkler, paint cans, drop cloths, bicycles and tire pumps, croquet set, deflated basketball, old moldy hammock. There is no room for a car in here, though there could be room for two. He should make room. He should clean this garage out. If its going to be a bad winter, truly, his truck might appreciate the shelter of a garage. His truck would probably be in a lot better shape if it had wintered in garages all its life. This is something he should do, before the snow, before its too late, right now.

He decides to start with the clutter, since he cant get to the boxes until the clutter is cleared away. He pulls garbage bags filled with clothes for Goodwill off an old loveseat and brings them outside, then he pushes the loveseat itself out into the driveway. He brings outside old paintings leaned up against the wall; these are mildewed, and wisps of a spiderweb stretch across the corner of a frame. He drags out the hammock, the croquet set, several pairs of rusted cross-country skis, bent poles, an old sled. Behind the box the birdhouse came in, he finds a familiar box that hed forgotten. It contains a zip cord to be stretched between two trees and a swing to ride between them. Hed bought it for Isabelle last year for Christmas, but somehow it hadnt made it under the tree.

He opens the box and unpacks the wire and the swing. The set comes with hooks to drill into the trees and, according to the directions, setup looks easy enough. Wilson steps outside the garage and surveys the edge of the woods behind their house for suitable trees to stretch the cord between. There are two that look solid enough, the space between them clear of other trees and long enough for a decent ride. He takes the power drill from where it sits on the shelf, a tape measure, and the box with the zip cord out to the trees. He measures exactly seven feet up from the ground and makes a mark on each tree with one of the hooks; seven feet is high enough that Isabelle will be able to dangle without needing to lift up her legs and low enough that if she were to fall shed be okay. He goes to drill the hook holes, but the power drill is dead. He takes it back to the garage to charge it, but this zip cord is something he wants to set up now, not later, so he goes back to the trees with a large screw and screwdriver and starts to drill the holes by hand. The wood is hard, and his fingers are numb, but slowly, stubbornly, he twists the screw around, around, around.

“Wilson!” he hears Ruths voice calling from the driveway. He looks toward her and blinks, unsure of how long hes even been standing at this tree. Isabelle is standing at her mothers side. “What are you doing?” Ruth says, gesturing at all the junk hes left out in the driveway.

Wilson sets his tools down and walks toward his wife and daughter. “I was cleaning out the garage,” he says.

Ruth looks past him toward the tree hes been working on. “Looks to me like youve made a mess of the driveway and are busy communing with a tree.”

“I found a zip cord. You know, one of those things you ride between the trees? I thought Id set it up for Isabelle.”

“I see.”

“And the power drill is dead.”

“Right. Well, were going to the grocery store. We shouldnt be more than an hour, but Ive left the split pea simmering, so could you go in and give it a stir once or twice?”

She opens the door to their station wagon and gets in. Isabelle gets in on the other side, and they drive away. Exhaust lingers in the cold air even after Wilson can no longer hear the cars engine. He breathes on his hands to warm them, and turns back to the tree.

“I spoke with Dr. Kleiner after your appointment yesterday,” Ruth says. She glances over at her daughter in the passenger seat. Isabelle stares out the side window—or rather at it, Ruth thinks; she cant see through it for the fog gathered on the glass. “He says hes not sure hes the right doctor for you, and he thinks we should find someone else.” She turns the defrost on high, keeping her eyes on the road ahead. Its a narrow, tree-lined road with blind curves. Ruth drives fast. “He says it takes two to make progress. You cant draw water from stone.” Ruth sighs and lowers the defrost. They come around a bend in the road and up suddenly on the tail of another car. Ruth brakes and frowns. “Fucking asshole,” she mutters.

Shes quiet for a minute. “Look, Isabelle,” she says. “If you dont want to speak to me, and you dont want to speak to your father, fine, but please, please try to cooperate with the doctors. Dr. Kleiner was what, the fourth? They just want to help you. I want to help you. Your father wants to help you. We all want to help you. We love you. Dont you want to get better? Dont you want to get to the bottom of all this shit?” She looks at her daughter hopefully. Isabelle sits like stone.

The two ride in silence for the rest of the drive. Ruth grips the steering wheel hard. She is angry at these doctors. All of them, it seems, have given up on Isabelle after little more than a month, each sending her on to another doctor who after a month will send her on to someone else. Ruth tries to explain to them that Isabelle is shy, that it takes her time to get comfortable, that if they only gave her a little bit longer she might warm up to them, might give them her trust. Dr. Kleiner had used the phrase “lost cause.” The recollection makes Ruth fume. That was the only diagnosis he could come up with, since no one can seem to find anything “wrong”: its not Aspergers, its not autism, its not anything that can be tested for and named. As far as Ruth and Wilson know, theres been nothing specific to catalyze it, no trauma or abuse. Lost cause. She pulls the car into the grocery store parking lot and parks with a lurch. Her daughter is no lost cause. Ruth will not give up. She looks at Isabelle. “Were going to beat this thing,” she says. “Now lets go shopping.”

Wilson has gotten about a half inch into the wood when he finally accepts the futility of trying to bore these holes by hand. He goes into the garage to test the power drill, but its mustered enough juice for only a feeble whining spin. He squints at the label; it takes two to three hours to fully charge. And it is not for dental use, thank you. He sets it back in the charger and surveys the garage and the things hes dragged outside. Hes lost enthusiasm for this project; he knows from times past that cleaning out a space just makes room for more clutter in the end. And what does it matter about the truck? One more winter wont kill it, and if it does, well, the things pretty much had it anyway. What he should do, Wilson thinks, is get himself a sports car or a motorcycle. Hes a middle-aged businessman, after all, and dont middle-aged businessmen do these kinds of things? Though he doesnt know quite what hed do with a sports car or a motorcycle. He wouldnt dare tinker with either of them as he does his truck, and its the tinkering he likes best.

A gust of wind blows dry leaves and sharp air into the garage. Wilson shivers. Already its starting to get dark. Wilson looks at his watch: three thirty. Ruth and Isabelle should be back soon from the grocery store. Wilson remembers the soup.

Ruth hands Isabelle the grocery list. This is always how it goes: Ruth pushes the cart up one aisle then the next while Isabelle runs through the store finding all the items on the list and brings them back to the cart, where she arranges them with scientific precision; their cart is always neatly packed. Isabelle has retrieved almost every item on the list and the cart is nearly full when Ruth reminds her to get ingredients for cake. “I didnt write them on the list because I didnt want your father to see. But we need to make a cake to bring to the restaurant as soon as we get home. Or you need to. We always said when you were eleven you could do the whole thing yourself, didnt we?” She thinks, hopes, she catches the trace of a smile on her daughters face. Isabelles specialty, learned from Ruth, is devils food cake with vanilla icing, raspberry jam between the two layers. Isabelle knows where to find what shell need; she leaves Ruth in the produce aisle to get them.

Ruth pushes the cart to the side of the aisle and out of the way of the other shoppers while she waits for Isabelle to return. She looks at the neatly stacked groceries in the cart in front of her and tries to remember when her daughter developed this grocery store habit. Three years ago? Four? Ruth wonders if she should have taken such perfectionism as a sign that something wasnt right. If she had, then maybe things wouldnt have to gotten to this point. And even if she hadnt taken that as a warning sign, surely she should have worried more when her daughter insisted on moving her mattress into the middle of her bedroom and taking the frame away to make things “safe.” And certainly she should have thought twice when, at eight, Isabelle cultivated the ability to speak backward. Too many times these thoughts have crossed her mind, and she is getting tired of them.

She wonders what would happen if she rearranged a box or two. She wonders if Isabelle would notice. Looking around her first to make sure her daughter is nowhere in sight, Ruth puts the Triscuits where the raisin bran had been and the raisin bran in the Triscuits spot. Just a subtle change. The two boxes are about the same size, so the overall arrangement of things hasnt been disrupted.

Isabelle returns with a box of devils food cake mix, the icing, and the jam. They already have the eggs and oil at home. She puts the icing and the jam with the other jars—peanut butter, pickles, and pasta sauce—in the child seat, but then she pauses when she goes to put the box of cake mix in among the other boxes down below. She stares into the cart, then slowly, deliberately, puts the Triscuits and raisin bran back into their original positions. She finds a spot for the cake mix and looks Ruth hard in the eye. Ruth feels herself blushing. “Isabelle,” she says. She wonders if she should make up an excuse: she was just reading the backs of all the boxes as she waited and must have put them away wrong, she thought the yellow of the Triscuits box would look better beside the red of the Cheez-Its box than the purple of the raisin bran did. “Im sorry,” she says, but Isabelle is already headed in the direction of the check-out lane.

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

MonkeyMia, July 25, 2008 (view all comments by MonkeyMia)
December is a gripping novel that uses descriptive human behavior to tell a story of a little girl who has not spoken in nearly a year. The characters' realistic lives will possess your mind from the first page to the last page. Psychologically suspenseful, tearfully sad and intelligently humorous, this book will entertain a readers appetite. I love this book, I love the writer, and it left me wanting more. Buy it.
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LibbyBean, July 16, 2008 (view all comments by LibbyBean)
Winthrop sounds like a child writing about an adult world she cannot yet fathom.

She begins the book describing Wilson, a central character, on his 42nd birthday, "He feels the same as he always has, all his life, same as he did as a kid stalking through the woods with a BB gun or a young man drunk at a keg party, and so sometimes he doesn't recognize the city business man he's become..."

Nobody at 42 with a marriage, a dependent child and a big job don't feels the way s/he always has. Life just shifts a person's mind, and Winthrop doesn't have any insight into how time and parenthood inexorably alter everyone without a personality disorder to stunt their development. Her forays into the minds of her adult characters are very naive imaginings.

She's bit off more than she can chew and should write about what she knows...which may not be much yet.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780307268303
Publisher:
Knopf
Subject:
Sick children
Author:
Elizabeth Hartley Winthrop
Author:
Elizabeth Hartley Winthrop
Subject:
Mute persons
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Publication Date:
20080617
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.48x6.56x.99 in. 1.08 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

December
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 256 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307268303 Reviews:
"Review" by , "This story of a family in crisis builds in emotion until a spellbinding climax brings things to a realistic and satisfying close."
"Review" by , "Winthrop, who grew up in New York before attending Harvard, where she graduated in 2001, displays an intimate, sometimes excruciatingly obsessive understanding of Isabelle's privileged Manhattan upbringing."
"Synopsis" by , In this novel of spellbinding emotional power, 11-year-old Isabelle hasn't spoken in eight months. As characters spiral desperately around Isabelle's impenetrable silence, she herself emerges, in a fascinating, boldly original portrait of an exceptional child.
"Synopsis" by , A spellbinding novel about a troubled young girl and a family in crisis, and a gripping, astonishing portrait of recovery and self-determination.

When December opens, eleven year old Isabelle hasnt spoken a word in nearly a year. Four psychiatrists have abandoned her, declaring her silence to be impenetrable. Her parents are at once mystified and terrified by their daughters withdrawal, and by their own gradually loosening hold on the world as theyve always known it. Isabelles private school, which has until now taken the extraordinary step of allowing her to complete her assignments from home, is on the verge of expelling her, forcing her parents to confront the possibility that what once seemed a quirk of adolescence, a phase, is perhaps a lifelong transformation, a swift and total retreat from which their daughter may never emerge. December paints an unforgettable picture of a family reckoning with a bewildering crisis, and of a critical month in the life of a bright, fascinating girl, locked into an isolation of her own making and from which only she can decide to break free.

Compulsively readable and deeply affecting, December is a work of marvelous originality and emotional power from a prodigiously gifted young writer.

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