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The Widower's Tale

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The Widower's Tale Cover

ISBN13: 9780307377920
ISBN10: 030737792x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Reading Group Guide

1. From the stories that the characters remember and tell, what kind of mother (and wife) was Poppy Darling? How would you explain the very different kinds of mothers her two daughters, Trudy and Clover, have become? Discuss the choices these two women have made and how they affect their relationships with their children. And how about Sarah? What kind of mother is she? Does being a mother define any or all of these women?

2. How do Percy’s age, background, and profession shape the way he thinks about the world around him? How does the way he sees himself differ from the way other characters see him? How has being a single father and now an involved grandfather defined him? How do you think he would have been a different father and man had Poppy lived? 

3. By the end of the novel, how has Percy changed/evolved?

4. Why do you think Percy chose to avoid romantic or sexual involvement for so many years after Poppy’s death? Is it habit and routine, nostalgia and commitment to his wife, or guilt over her death; or a combination of all three? Why do you think he falls so suddenly for Sarah after all that time alone? Why now?

5. The novel takes place over the course of a year, with chapters varying from Percy’s point of view (looking back from the end of that year) to those of Celestino, Robert, and Ira. Why do you think Julia Glass chose to narrate only Percy’s chapters in a first-person voice, the rest in the third person? (Does this make you think of the way she handled voice in her previous books?) And why do you think, when there are so many important female characters in this novel, that she chose to tell the story only through the eyes of men?

6. What do you think of the allusion in this book’s title to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales?

7. This is a novel about family, the intricacies of the intertwining relationships among parents and children, grandparents and grandchildren, siblings and cousins, in-laws and girlfriends. Discuss and compare some of the central familial relationships here (particularly those between Percy and the various members of his extended clan). Do any of these relationships ring particularly true to your own family experiences? Which ones fascinate or move you the most?

8. Celestino is an outsider and a loner—in the eyes of the law, an illegal alien—who was brought to the United States by a stroke of good fortune, only to lose his favored status and end up in a precarious situation with little money and no close friends. Discuss the circumstances that bring him into Percy’s circle and the way in which he becomes so important in Robert’s and Percy’s lives? What destiny do you imagine for him beyond the end of the novel?

9. Discuss Celestino and Isabelle’s teenage relationship as compared with the way they view each other once they are reunited as adults. Do you think that it would have worked out differently under other circumstances, or do culture and class sometimes present insurmountable obstacles? Compare Celestino and Isabelle’s youthful relationship with the one between Robert and Clara.

10. What do you think of Robert’s relationship with his mother? Talk about the way he sees her in the college essay he wrote versus the way he sees her after the argument they have in the car the night before Thanksgiving and Robert finds out about the sibling he almost had. How is Robert’s intimate view of Trudy, as her son and only child, different from Percy’s fatherly view of Trudy as one of two daughters? Compare Robert’s and Percy’s different visions of her professional life: Robert’s summer working in the chemo clinic versus Percy’s first visit to the hospital when he seeks Trudy’s advice about Sarah. Is there a generational difference to the way they encounter the world of modern medicine?  

11. What about Percy’s relationship with Clover? What do you think about his “sacrifice” of the barn to help her out? Is it entirely altruistic? What are the unintended consequences to their love for each other? Why does Clover resent her father and betray both him and her nephew, Robert, at the end of the novel?

12. Why does Robert, the good student and good son, allow himself to become involved in Arturo’s “missions”? Discuss Robert’s friendship with Arturo and why Arturo is so appealing to Robert. What do you think of the observation that Turo is “of everywhere and nowhere?”

13. What do you think about Turo’s activist group, the DOGS, and their acts of eco-vandalism? Do you agree with Turo that conservation efforts like recycling and organic lawn care aren’t “dramatic enough to make a dent” (p. 148) in society’s lazy, consumerist ways—that true change will come about only through extremism? 

14. Discuss the importance of the tree house in the novel. What does it represent, if anything, to each of the four main characters?

15. What do you think of Ira and his relationship with Anthony? How have Ira’s fears influenced his relationships in general? How do you imagine the crisis at the end of the book has changed him, if at all?

16. Homes often seem like characters in Julia Glass novels; compare Percy’s house with key houses in her other novels, if you’ve read them (e.g., Tealing, Fenno McLeod’s childhood house in Three Junes; Uncle Marsden’s run-down seaside mansion in The Whole World Over). Describe Percy’s house and its significance to various members of the Darling family. Discuss its tie to the neighboring house and the revelation at the end about the two brothers who built the houses. Why is this important?

17. How have libraries changed over the course of Percy’s working life, through his youth, his daughters’ youth, and now Robert’s youth? Percy doesn’t seem to approve of the direction libraries are going and the way in which society regards books. Do you?

18. “‘Daughters.’ This word meant everything to me in that moment: sun, moon, stars, blood, water (oh curse the water!), meat, potatoes, wine, shoes, books, the floor beneath my feet, the roof over my head” (p. 108). Compare and contrast Percy’s two daughters.

19. Why is Sarah so evasive and even hostile when Percy confronts her about the lump in her breast—and even after she starts cancer treatment with Trudy? What do you think about her decision to marry her ex-boyfriend when he offers her the lifeline of his health insurance—and to keep this a secret from Percy? What does it say about Sarah and her feelings for Percy? Do you think the relationship, at the end of the book, is salvageable in any form?

20. While visiting a museum, Percy’s friend Norval asks, “So what sort of landscape are you?” Percy replies, “A field. Overgrown and weedy.” Norval then suggests, “Or a very large, gnarled tree” (p. 278). How would you describe Percy? How about yourself; what sort of landscape are you? 

21. How is The Widower’s Tale both a tale of our time and a story specific to its place, to New England?

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 5 comments:

radfemme, March 22, 2011 (view all comments by radfemme)
Much like the seasons do for us, the intertwining voices of this book carry us through a year in the life of a family and its widening community in a familiar but dynamic manner. Percival Darling is the man you're glad isn't your neighbor but he could be a male version of me when I'm old if I'm not careful now. Still, you've got to love fictional curmudgeons who love others, right? And reading about my new "hometown" of Cambridge, MA and its still-unknown-to-me environs was a real pleasure. If you like character-driven stories of ordinary people who are more interesting than you would think just passing them on the street, you'll probably like Glass's newest novel.
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radfemme, March 22, 2011 (view all comments by radfemme)
Much like the seasons do for us, the intertwining voices of this book carry us through a year in the life of a family and its widening community in a familiar but dynamic manner. Percival Darling is the man you're glad isn't your neighbor but he could be a male version of me when I'm old if I'm not careful now. Still, you've got to love fictional curmudgeons who love others, right? And reading about my new "hometown" of Cambridge, MA and its still-unknown-to-me environs was a real pleasure. If you like character-driven stories of ordinary people who are more interesting than you would think just passing them on the street, you'll probably like Glass's newest novel.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Karen DeVaney, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by Karen DeVaney)
This book definitely lives up to the high standards set by Julia Glass in her previous books. I expect great narrative and characterization from her, and she did not disappoint. I lived and breathed these characters, and was ultimately both uplifted and irked at the twists and turns in their stories, just like real life. This is not a clean, neatly wrapped-up novel with a single story arc and a pat, happy conclusion. This is a messy, wide-ranging look at social classes and issues, medical professionals, ecoterrorism and radical green movements, divorce, societal pressures, widowers and dating, college life, immigrants... all set in a Boston suburb revolving around the main characters of an elderly widower, his two daughters, a grandson, and an immigrant laborer. I was pulled into the story by the setting and premise, and stayed for the roller coaster ride of disparate strands of seemingly real life crashing into each other. It was a pleasurable and thought-provoking read.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780307377920
Author:
Glass, Julia
Publisher:
Pantheon Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Widows
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
fiction;family;massachusetts;relationships;new england;ecoterrorism;breast cancer;novel;boston;widower;cancer;contemporary;harvard;sisters;love
Publication Date:
20100931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9.46x6.58x1.28 in. 1.60 lbs.

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Widower's Tale Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780307377920 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Percy Darling, 70, the narrator of Glass's fourth novel, takes comfort in certitudes: he will never leave his historic suburban Boston house, he is done with love (still guilty about his wife's death 30 years ago), and his beloved grandson Robert, a Harvard senior, will do credit to the family name. But Glass (Three Junes) spins a beautifully paced, keenly observed story in which certainties give way to surprising reversals of fortune. Percy is an opinionated, cantankerous, newly retired Harvard librarian and nobody's 'darling,' who decides to lease his barn to a local preschool, mainly to give his daughter Clover, who has abandoned her husband and children in New York, a job. Percy's other daughter is a workaholic oncologist in Boston who becomes important to a young mother at the school with whom Percy, to his vast surprise, establishes a romantic relationship. Meanwhile, Percy's grandson, Robert, falls in with an ecoterrorist group. Glass handles the coalescing plot elements with astute insights into the complexity of family relationships, the gulf between social classes, and our modern culture of excess to create a dramatic, thought-provoking, and immensely satisfying novel. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "Another heartwarming winner from the NBA-anointed Massachusetts author....Glass's perfect plot gives each character his or her due, in an irresistible pastoral tragicomedy that showcases the warmth and wisdom of one of America's finest novelists, approaching if not already arrived at her peak."
"Review" by , "Elaborately plotted and luxuriously paced, Glass' inquisitive, compassionate, funny, and suspenseful saga addresses significant and thorny social issues with emotional veracity, artistic nuance, and a profound perception of the grand interconnectivity of life."
"Review" by , "Each strand of this narrative macramé is surprisingly supple, offering a convincing illusion of lives roundly lived.... Glass propels her characters through a world that is sometimes dire but also sweetly normal and often joyful."
"Review" by , "Energized, good-humored..., beginning as satire, becoming stealthily suspenseful and ending up with a satisfyingly clear-eyed and compassionate view of American entitlement and its fallout."
"Synopsis" by , A rich and suspenseful novel from the award-winning author of Three Junes and I See You Everywhere.

In a quirky farmhouse outside Boston, 70-year-old Percy Darling enjoys a vigorous but mostly solitary life — until, in a complex scheme to help his oldest daughter through a crisis, he allows a progressive preschool to move into his barn. The abrupt transformation of Percy’s rural refuge into a lively, youthful community compels him to reexamine the choices he’s made since his wife’s death, three decades ago, in a senseless accident that haunts him still. No longer can he remain aloof from his neighbors, his two grown daughters, or, to his shock, the precarious joy of falling in love.

Meanwhile, Percy’s beloved grandson Robert, a premed student at Harvard, joins his visionary roommate in a series of environmental “actions” targeting the well-to-do; they begin as pranks but escalate insidiously, with dire consequences for Robert’s family and the people around them, including a Guatemalan gardener and a gay preschool teacher, whose lives intersect fatefully with those of the Darlings. With equal parts affection and satire, Julia Glass spins a powerful tale about the multigenerational loyalties, rivalries, and secrets of a family, inhabitants of a complacently prosperous world where no one is immune to unexpected change. Yet again, she plumbs the human heart brilliantly, dramatically, and movingly.

"Synopsis" by , In a quirky farmhouse outside Boston, 70-year-old Percy Darling enjoys a vigorous but mostly solitary life until, in a complex scheme to help his oldest daughter through a crisis, he allows a progressive preschool to move into his barn. The abrupt transformation of Percy's rural refuge into a lively, youthful community compels him to reexamine the choices he's made.
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