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1 Burnside Gay and Lesbian- Men's Fiction

The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy

by

The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy Cover

 

 

Excerpt

Chapter 1

In the Dear John letter Daddy left for Mother and me, on a Saturday afternoon in early June 1996, on the inlaid Florentine table in the front entry of our house, which we found that night upon returning from a day spent in the crème-colored light of Neimans, Daddy wrote that he was leaving us because Mother was crazy, and because shed driven me crazy in a way that perfectly suited her own insanity.

Wed just been to the Dairy Queen. My mouth was full of hamburger when I found the letter. Mother still had on the Jackie O sunglasses Id given her earlier that week for her forty-fifth birthday, and was fumbling on the wall for the light switch. I read through the letter once, fast, and then called to Mother, who read it over slowly, sitting down in one of the low white chairs that lined the hall. Mother didnt sit as she typically sat, with her calves fixed before her like they were the pillars of her lap. The way Mother sat on the low white chair against the wall of the entry, willowy leaves of yellow legal paper drifting from her thin fingers, her calves looked as though theyd collapsed. She signaled with the letter to the shopping bags beside the front door, their tissue paper poking up like dorsal fins: “All that goes back tomorrow.”

My first reaction to Daddys leaving was relief. I was sixteen, and what I wanted most for my mother was a divorce. For years, Id kept a stack of Mothers old magazines under my bed, copies of Vanity Fair and Hello!, with dog-eared articles about Pamela Harriman, and ladies for whom the end of marriage was only the beginning of plastic surgery and happy new lives.

One afternoon, while watching Of Human Bondage on the Channel 13 Three OClock Million Dollar Movie, when Bette Davis told Leslie Howard, “It made me sick when I let you kiss me. . . . I used to wipe my mouth!” Mother said to me, “Hmm. Thats pretty much the way I feel about your father.”

So my dream was for Mother to leave Daddy. Then we could escape Nana and Papas horse ranch outside Petunia, a small town the settlers managed to chop out of The Great Piney Woods of East Texas a hundred miles north of Houston. Between the freeway being rerouted and the recent construction of a Super Wal-Mart outside town, Petunia wasnt much more than a Dairy Queen, some gas stations, and a funeral home. White-columned and stately, Kahns Funeral Home on Main Street was, in fact, the prettiest thing about Petunia, which, in itself, was pretty depressing. “It figures youd have to die in this town to experience beauty,” Mother said.

Mother spoke in quotable phrases, as though she intended her words to be embroidered. One of her great pleasures was thinking up new ways to describe just how ugly our town was, and the way shed settled on in the summer of 1996 was to say that Petunia was Where God Stuck The Enema. We lived in what Mother called our South Will Rise Again house, a Greek Revival creation that stank of new money and was practically lacy with pillars and columns and porticos and little moldings of cherubim flying all over the place. It sat in the middle of a flat, empty pasture on my grandparents ranch, and in the summer our white house shone like a heat spot from the road.

With her divorce settlement, I dreamt that Mother would move us into a real neighborhood in the city of Houston, shady with fat, mossy live oaks; and Id wear a blue-blazered uniform to St. Johns or Kincaid, the citys swank prep schools, instead of attending the fundamentalist Lutheran school that was the best education Petunia had to offer. Once wed moved, every day could be like our Saturdays at Neimans, where Mother and I went to get our hair and nails done at the salon and then go shopping.

But in all the time Id spent daydreaming about my parents divorce, the idea had never occurred to me that Daddy, who looked like an Oscar in a baseball cap—six feet four, bald, and muscle-y, with skin permanently tanned golden brown from long days in the Texas sun—might leave my glamorous, blond Mother.

People thought she was a TV star. Shopgirls would say, “Arent you that lady on TV?” By which they meant no one in particular. Sometimes somebody would say Barbara Eden. Sometimes Suzanne Somers. Occasionally Connie Stevens. Its not that Mother looked like these people—she just looked like someone special. Waiters at posh restaurants like Brennans and Tonys often gave us free food, afraid Mother was a famous person they didnt recognize who might have them fired for offering less than VIP service. And though by forty-five, Mothers makeup had grown heavier to shade the tiny wrinkles around her eyes that looked like fractures in a windshield, men in pickup trucks still hung out of their windows to whistle at her on the freeway. “What makes me irresistible,” Mother once asked me, wearing an expression like shed swallowed sour milk, “to a man in a pickup truck and a baseball cap?”

Despite his Houston Astros cap and his old Dodge pickup, Mother would never have left my father. The reason shed stayed with him, and the reason his leaving us meant bad trouble, was because Daddy, by himself, had no money. Which was something I always forgot while reading Vanity Fair. Daddy didnt have any money, because Papa, Daddys rich father, had a Bonanza fantasy, to keep his son on his horse ranch at all costs. Nana and Papa paid Daddy a crazy-huge allowance throughout my parents marriage, so he would stay on their ranch and use his vet degree to breed and doctor Papas champion racehorses. They footed my parents bills, bought Mother and Daddys cars, and paid off their charge accounts. So, on paper, Daddy was a poor man. And our tacky white house was the only thing in the world my parents really owned, which meant that any divorce settlement would be pitifully small.

Some twenty years earlier, Daddy had fallen in love with Mother at a Steve McQueen movie at the Texas A&M student union, and theyd married while he was still in veterinary school. Mother had been a campus celebrity. Shed earned extra money modeling clothes on local television for Lesters department store—where her job had been to stare into the camera and whisper “Lesters” in a way that sounded mysterious and sexy. As a young girl at A&M, Mother had married Daddy, believing his rich parents would eventually make him rich, too, either by setting him up with a trust fund or a business to run. And when that hadnt happened, shed stayed for Nana and Papas money.

Mother let Daddys letter fall to the floor, twisting her engagement ring around her finger. “Jesus God,” she said. “This is a pig fuck.”

“Pig Fuck” was Mothers phrase for the absolute nadir of something. Lycra was, for instance, the pig fuck of fabrics, with English toile, pimento loaf, Japanese cars, and Miracle Whip serving as further examples. And because Mother was an extreme person, whose circumstances tended to swerve from the best to the worst, our life involved lots of pig fucks. (“There is no such thing,” she once told me, “as a happy medium.”) As a small boy, Id even seen Mother wrap her white mink around the rickety shoulders of a shivering girl waiting in a January slush outside the Petunia post office. And over the years, Mother had spent every dollar that passed through her checkbook on clothes, jewelry, and luxury vacations. So when Daddy left, taking Nana and Papas money with him, Mother and I quickly realized we were nouveau poor. Which was the pig fuck of all time. “As of this minute, Robert,” Mother said, “we have one hundred and twenty-seven dollars in the bank.”

I started to feel queasy, as if the tomato aspic and tiny cucumber sandwiches Mother and I had eaten earlier that afternoon at Neimans tearoom were reacting poorly with the Belt Buster Id gotten at the Dairy Queen. “Youre right,” I told Mother. “This is a pig fuck.”

Mother reread Daddys letter a couple of times, then took off her heels, and shrank four inches in five seconds. “He just loves us so much he had to go right out and leave us. Well, I shouldnt be surprised. What can you expect when you cast pearls at swine?” Then Mother went to the kitchen, and filled an Evian bottle with vodka—something she often did when she was depressed but wanted to appear concerned with physical fitness. “Im going to bed to watch my movie,” she said.

I knew from long experience that Breakfast at Tiffanys was Mothers movie. The VCR was invented for my mother, because if something was good, then more of it was better. When Mother was fond of a movie, like Breakfast at Tiffanys, she couldnt watch it too many times. That VHS tape was among the great stabilizing influences of her life; she tended to fall back on it whenever her emotions swung too far in any direction, and particularly when she was depressed. That night, Mother looked like she needed Breakfast at Tiffanys badly.

I dont know what Id expected in a letter from my father explaining the necessity of his leaving me, but Daddys letter was, nevertheless, a disappointment. It filled four wandering, rumpled pages, in an ink too bright for its purpose, and was peppered with the same humdrum gripes that filled his regular fights with Mother. That Mother and I hated, and were abjectly humiliated by, his family. That she was never satisfied, and had taught me to be never satisfied, too, and that we both spent his money with disregard. “Nothings ever good enough for you two,” Daddy wrote, before starting a sputtering list of the various occasions hed found our behavior odd, or, rather “unnormal.” Daddy carped that Mother had become obsessed with preserving her youth and beauty. That shed had her face lifted and hadnt told him; and that wed spent his birthday in Rome, and their wedding anniversary in Paris, and hadnt even telephoned. But soon after Daddy began listing his grievances, the wattage of his fight fell low, and he shortly wound down to signing, “Your Loving Father and Husband, Bob ODoole.”

I was baffled. I couldnt imagine him writing such a letter. You could tell Daddy had taken his time in writing it, because sometimes the ink changed color, from blue to black, even in the middle of a sentence. Sometimes his handwriting was hard-pressed and jagged, sometimes faint, as though his words could hardly stand to touch the paper. I tried to imagine Daddy writing—angry, by the cab light of his old pickup that danced with diesel and George Jones songs, or sad, sitting in an empty bathtub in the middle of the night. But I couldnt, because in my whole life, Id never seen him write anything longer than a check. And because, while Daddy had plenty of grounds for divorce, I found it deeply peculiar that hed choose to leave us for a string of petty grievances, instead of one big, overarching outrage. Daddy had always seemed to have the lowest threshold for satisfaction of anybody Id ever known. As long as he got to spend his days with Papa and the horses, I couldnt imagine him making big changes in his life, particularly something this drastic. He wasnt constantly distracted, like Mother and I, by desire. Daddy was living proof of the Buddhas claim that desire only makes you miserable, but he also proved my belief that desire is the only thing that makes you interesting. My father didnt want anything, and he was not interesting.

“Ahh,” Daddy had sighed, when I told him, on the night Mother and I returned from our first trip to Manhattan, that when I grew up, I wanted to be a star of New York City; that I wanted to make best friends with Dina Merrill and Kitty Carlisle Hart (who were the two people Id most often seen photographed in Town & Country, which was another magazine Mother subscribed to); and that I wanted us all to go tap dancing together under the Eloise portrait at the Plaza Hotel, singing “New York, New York” with Liza Minnelli while riding in a carriage through Central Park on our way to Bloomingdales. “Youll grow out of all that,” he said. And then he grinned. Daddy was a grinner. You could watch him idling across Papas land, his Astros cap tipped back, and always that same dumb grin. “One day, youll realize that everything good about lifes right here. Just like George Bailey in Its a Wonderful Life.” It drove me crazy whenever Daddy used Its a Wonderful Life as a parable. His whole life, hed had one favorite color (blue, which is practically everybodys favorite color) and one favorite movie, Its a Wonderful Life, because it confirmed his perception of the world: that anything that really mattered could be found at your own front door, which in our case was in the middle of Papas pasture.

So, as the next few days passed and we didnt hear from Daddy, I walked around in a state of furious disbelief, wondering how I could have gotten my father so wrong; how a man who seemed as satisfied as he did could suddenly pick up and leave his life. It was positively confounding. But then something happened that made me realize that in his letter Daddy hadnt expressed a forthright position. Something happened that made me understand that the reason he left Mother and me while we were gone to Neiman Marcus and the Dairy Queen had little to do with however unnormal we happened to be. Daddy decided to leave us because hed found something new. And Something New was pregnant.

The following week, when Daddy brought Something New, brought Pam, to my mothers house to pick up his remaining things, a day Mother referred to as The Sacking of Troy, and Pam wore a draping mans flannel shirt that just revealed a bulging belly too firm for fat, it became quite clear that Daddys departure wasnt nearly so sudden as it seemed, and that hed considered it, at the very least, since February.

That afternoon Mother didnt go downstairs, insisting it was beneath her dignity to confront her husbands mistress in her own front hall. “If your father thinks hes going to humiliate me in front of That Woman, then hed just better think again.” I stayed upstairs with Mother, and we both peeked down, from a place on the landing where we knew we wouldnt be seen. “Lets see the merchandise theyre peddling these days, Robert,” Mother told me.

While my father rummaged, Pam waited in the front hall. Every part of her body was wiry and hungry looking, except for her huge stomach—which pooched out before her like a python that had swallowed a rabbit. “Look at her,” Mother said, eyeing Pams stomach. “Full as a money bag. Full as a deposit slip. . . .

“You know, you stay in a marriage,” she said. “Even when you know it doesnt work, because . . . it works in the way it doesnt work. In a way that starting over . . . from scratch . . . does not work.

“Oh, Robert,” said Mother, “it is time for me to start over from scratch.”

 

Copyright © 2007 by Robert Leleux. All rights reserved.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312361686
Author:
Leleux, Robert
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Subject:
BIO026000
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Mothers and sons
Subject:
Authors, American
Subject:
Childhood Memoir
Subject:
Bildungsromans
Subject:
Topic/Marriage
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Topic - Marriage & Family
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20090106
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.4 x 5.5 x 0.9 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » Men's Fiction
History and Social Science » Americana » Texas

The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy Used Hardcover
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Product details 304 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312361686 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Teacher, freelance writer and first-time author Leleux proves he's already a master of the snappy one-liner and the improbably hilarious in this rollicking, bitter-sweet (emphasis on the bitter) coming-of-age memoir. Featuring a larger-than life mother addicted to shopping and surgical makeovers, Leleux admits to having 'tilted' the story so that it 'reads better (as in funnier, or happier) than it was lived'; still, it's a rocky trip that obviously required a highly evolved sense of humor to get through (fortunately, Leleux makes himself as big a target as his extravagant mother). Beginning with his father's abandonment when Leleux was 17, the author traces the erratic aftermath in the home of his desperate mom, whose plan to remarry rich leads her to pursue a risky and exorbitant series of surgical enhancements, turning inside-out Leleux's hope that 'the end of marriage would be only the beginning of plastic surgery and happy new lives.' In the meantime, Robert meets and unexpectedly falls in love with Michael Leleux, learning for the first time that he's gay and, further, that his mom has already known. Not for the timid, this laugh-out-loud tale of dysfunction and discovery is a compulsively readable treat; any fan of Augusten Burroughs or David Sedaris owes it to themselves to pick it up." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Like most young memoirists, Leleux finds himself and his family always more fascinating than the reader may, but he displays a nice self-effacing wit, a talent for constructing funny scenes, and a genuinely sweet spirit that engages the readers sympathy."
"Review" by , "I never really thought much about having a gay son until I read The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy and laughed out loud so often I thought I'd better keep this book on hand in case I ever need to cure myself of a terminal disease. When I finished the book, I missed Robert Leleux's company so much, I wished he were my own son so I could call and hear his answer to, 'So, sweetie, how was your day?'"
"Review" by , "Reader, stand back! Here's Robert Leleux, the funniest young writer to appear in who knows when, with a maelstrom of a mother straight out of hell and Neiman Marcus, talking his way into the affections of readers everywhere with a wicked tongue tempered — barely — by a big generous heart."
"Synopsis" by , In a memoir studded with delicious lines and unforgettable set pieces, Leleux describes his east Texas boyhood and coming of age, under the tutelage of his eccentric, bewigged, flamboyant, and knowing mother.
"Synopsis" by ,

In the Dear John letter Daddy left for Mother and me, on a Saturday afternoon in early June 1996, on the inlaid Florentine table in the front entry of our house, which we found that night upon returning from a day spent in the crème-colored light of Neimans, Daddy wrote that he was leaving us because Mother was crazy, and because shed driven me crazy in a way that perfectly suited her own insanity.

In a memoir studded with delicious lines and unforgettable set pieces, Robert Leleux describes his East Texas boyhood and coming of age under the tutelage of his eccentric, bewigged, flamboyant, and knowing mother.

Left high and dry by Daddy and living on their in-laws horse ranch in a white-pillared house they cant afford, Robert and Mother find themselves chronically low on cash. Soon they are forced into more modest quarters, and as a teenaged Robert watches with hilarity and horror, Mother begins a desperate regimen of makeovers, extreme plastic surgeries, and finally hairpiece epoxies---all calculated to secure a new, wealthy husband. 

Mothers strategy takes her, with Robert in tow, from the glamorous environs of the Neiman Marcus beauty salon to questionable surgery offices and finally to a storefront clinic on the wrong side of Houston. Meanwhile, Robert begins his own journey away from Mother and through the local theaters world of miscast hopefuls and thwarted ambitions---and into a romance that surprises absolutely no one but himself.

Written with a warmth and a wicked sense of fun that lighten even the most awful circumstances, The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy is a sparkling debut. 

"Synopsis" by ,

The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy is The Houston Press's Best Houston Book of the Year for 2008.

In the Dear John letter Daddy left for Mother and me, on a Saturday afternoon in early June 1996, on the inlaid Florentine table in the front entry of our house, which we found that night upon returning from a day spent in the crème-colored light of Neimans, Daddy wrote that he was leaving us because Mother was crazy, and because shed driven me crazy in a way that perfectly suited her own insanity.

In a memoir studded with delicious lines and unforgettable set pieces, Robert Leleux describes his East Texas boyhood and coming of age under the tutelage of his eccentric, bewigged, flamboyant, and knowing mother.

Left high and dry by Daddy and living on their in-laws horse ranch in a white-pillared house they cant afford, Robert and Mother find themselves chronically low on cash. Soon they are forced into more modest quarters, and as a teenaged Robert watches with hilarity and horror, Mother begins a desperate regimen of makeovers, extreme plastic surgeries, and finally hairpiece epoxies---all calculated to secure a new, wealthy husband. 

Mothers strategy takes her, with Robert in tow, from the glamorous environs of the Neiman Marcus beauty salon to questionable surgery offices and finally to a storefront clinic on the wrong side of Houston. Meanwhile, Robert begins his own journey away from Mother and through the local theaters world of miscast hopefuls and thwarted ambitions---and into a romance that surprises absolutely no one but himself.

Written with a warmth and a wicked sense of fun that lighten even the most awful circumstances, The Memoirs of a Beautiful Boy is a sparkling debut. 

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