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Yiddish Language Edition

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1 Beaverton Humor- Ethnic and Regional

Yiddish with Dick and Jane

by and

Yiddish with Dick and Jane Cover

ISBN13: 9780316159722
ISBN10: 0316159727
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Yiddish is everywhere. We hear words like nosh, schlep, and schmutz all the time, but how did these words come to pepper American English? In Yiddishkeit: Jewish Vernacular and the New Land, Harvey Pekar and Paul Buhle trace the influence of Yiddish from medieval Europe to the tenements of New Yorkand#8217;s Lower East Side. This comics anthology contains original stories by notable writers and artists such as Barry Deutsch, Peter Kuper, Spain Rodriguez, and Sharon Rudahl. Through illustrations, comics art, and a full-length play, four major themes are explored: culture, performance, assimilation, and the revival of the language. The last fully realized work by Harvey Pekar, this book is a thoughtful compilation that reveals the far-reaching influences of Yiddish.

Praise for Yiddishkeit:

and#8220;The book is about what Neal Gabler in his introduction labels and#8216;Jewish sensibility.and#8217; It pervades this volume, which he acknowledges is messy; he writes: and#8216;You really can't define Yiddishkeit neatly in words or pictures. You sort of have to feel it by wading into it.and#8217; The book does this with gusto.and#8221; and#8212;New York Times

and#8220;Yiddishkeit is as colorful, bawdy, and charming as the culture it seeks to represent.and#8221;

and#8212;Print magazine

and#8220;every bit of it brimming with the charm and flavor of its subject and seamlessly meshing with the text to create a genuinely compelling, scholarly comics experienceand#8221;

and#8212;Publishers Weekly

and#8220;Yiddishkeit is a book that truly informs about Jewish culture and, in the process, challenges readers to pick apart their own vocabulary.and#8221; and#8212;Chicago Tribune

and#8220;a postvernacular tour de forceand#8221;

and#8212;The Forward

and#8220;A fascinating and enlightening effort that takes full use of the graphic storytelling medium in an insightful and revelatory way.and#8221; and#8212;The Miami Herald

and#8220;With a loving eye Pekar and Buhle extract moments and personalities from Yiddish history.and#8221; and#8212;Hadassah

and#8220;gorgeous comix-style portraits of Yiddish writersand#8221;

and#160;and#8211;and#8211;Tabletand#160;

and#8220;Yiddishkeit has managed to survive, if just barely, not because there are individuals dedicated to its survival, though there are, but because Yiddishkeit is an essential part of both the Jewish and the human experience.and#8221;and#160;

and#8212;Neal Gabler, author of An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood, from his introduction

"The hearty hardcover is a scrumptious smorgasbord of comics, essays, and illustrations, edited by Harvey Pekar and Paul Buhle, providing concentrated tastes, with historical context, of Yiddish theater, literature, characters and culture." and#8212;Heeb magazine

Review:

"Dick and Jane are all grown up, and they're living in the real world-and it's full of tsuris (troubles). That's the premise of this hilarious little book, which functions both as a humorous tale and a genuine guide to a language with a sentiment and world view all its own. Jane is married to Bob and has two perfect children. Dick schmoozes with business people over golf: 'Schmooze, Dick. Schmooze....' Their sister, Sally, who teaches a course in 'Transgressive Feminist Ceramics,' can see that life is not perfect, even though dear Dick and Jane cannot. Their mother has a stroke ('Oy vey, Jane,' says Dick when he learns the news). Bob's best friend's wife is having an affair because the best friend himself is gay (''Tom is more than gay, Sally,' says Dick. 'He is overjoyed.'... 'Oy Gotenyu oh, God help us,' sighs Sally.') And purse dealers take advantage of the gullible. The brief story is priceless, but the equally funny glossary is a great reference to which readers can return any time they need the right Yiddish word-or whenever they need to determine whether the jerk they just saw is a putz, a schmo or a schmuck." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Jane is in real estate.

Today is Saturday.

Jane has an open house.

She must schlep the Open House signs to the car.

See Jane schlep.

Schlep, Jane. Schlep.

Schlep, schlep, schlep.

In text that captures the unque rhythms of the original Dick and Jane readers, and in 35 all-new illustrations, a story unfolds in which Dick and Jane--hero and heroine of the classic books for children that generations of Americans have used when learning to read--manage to express shades of feeling and nuances of meaning that ordinary English just can't deliver. How? By speaking Yiddish, employing terms that convey an attitude--part plucky self-assertion, part ironic fatalism. When Dick schmoozes, when Jane kvetches, when their children fress noodles at a Chinese restaurant, the clash of cultures produces genuine hilarity.

Synopsis:

"Oy vey"--this is a primer like no other. In an inspired parodic twist, the two least Jewish characters in American literature spout some of the edgy, ironic Yiddishisms that have become part of the American vernacular. 35 full-color drawings.

About the Author

Ross MacDonald is a contributing editor of Virginia Quarterly Review and a contributing artist for Vanity Fair. His award-winning illustrations have appeared in the New Yorker, Newsweek, the Wall Street Journal, and Rolling Stone. He was also the subject of a one-man retrospective at the New York Times. He lives in Newtown, Connecticut. 

James Victore is an independent graphic designer based in New York City whose clients include Moët & Chandon, Target, Amnesty International, the Shakespeare Project, the New York Times, and MTV. He has won an Emmy for television animation, and gold and silver medals from the New York Art Directors Club.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Jennifer Short, May 20, 2008 (view all comments by Jennifer Short)
Oy Vey! It's Dick and Jane and Sally! They are back in this parody, and all grown up! Enjoy their adventures as adults while learning a little Yiddish along the way! A fun book that anyone will enjoy!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780316159722
Author:
Ellis Weiner and Barbara Davilman
Publisher:
Little Brown and Company
Illustrator:
Payn, Gabi
Author:
Pekar, Harvey
Author:
Victore, James
Author:
Rodriguez, Spain
Author:
Weiner, Ellis
Author:
Buhle, Paul
Author:
McDonald, Ross
Author:
Lasky, David
Author:
Davilman, Barbara
Author:
Kuper, Peter
Author:
MacDonald, Ross
Author:
Deutsch, Barry
Author:
Payn, Gabi
Author:
Gabler, Neal
Author:
Rudahl, Sharon
Location:
New York
Subject:
Readers
Subject:
Form - Parodies
Subject:
Yiddish
Subject:
Yiddish language
Subject:
Readers (Primary)
Subject:
Parodies
Subject:
HUMOR / Parodies
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Dick and Jane
Series Volume:
no. 32/2002
Publication Date:
20040931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
50 color illustrations
Pages:
112
Dimensions:
7.50 x 5.50 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Ethnic and Regional
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Parodies
Children's » Activities » General
Education » Writing
History and Social Science » Military » General History
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Reference » Bibliography and Library Science
Religion » Judaism » General

Yiddish with Dick and Jane Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 112 pages Little Brown and Company - Yiddish 9780316159722 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Dick and Jane are all grown up, and they're living in the real world-and it's full of tsuris (troubles). That's the premise of this hilarious little book, which functions both as a humorous tale and a genuine guide to a language with a sentiment and world view all its own. Jane is married to Bob and has two perfect children. Dick schmoozes with business people over golf: 'Schmooze, Dick. Schmooze....' Their sister, Sally, who teaches a course in 'Transgressive Feminist Ceramics,' can see that life is not perfect, even though dear Dick and Jane cannot. Their mother has a stroke ('Oy vey, Jane,' says Dick when he learns the news). Bob's best friend's wife is having an affair because the best friend himself is gay (''Tom is more than gay, Sally,' says Dick. 'He is overjoyed.'... 'Oy Gotenyu oh, God help us,' sighs Sally.') And purse dealers take advantage of the gullible. The brief story is priceless, but the equally funny glossary is a great reference to which readers can return any time they need the right Yiddish word-or whenever they need to determine whether the jerk they just saw is a putz, a schmo or a schmuck." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Jane is in real estate.

Today is Saturday.

Jane has an open house.

She must schlep the Open House signs to the car.

See Jane schlep.

Schlep, Jane. Schlep.

Schlep, schlep, schlep.

In text that captures the unque rhythms of the original Dick and Jane readers, and in 35 all-new illustrations, a story unfolds in which Dick and Jane--hero and heroine of the classic books for children that generations of Americans have used when learning to read--manage to express shades of feeling and nuances of meaning that ordinary English just can't deliver. How? By speaking Yiddish, employing terms that convey an attitude--part plucky self-assertion, part ironic fatalism. When Dick schmoozes, when Jane kvetches, when their children fress noodles at a Chinese restaurant, the clash of cultures produces genuine hilarity.

"Synopsis" by , "Oy vey"--this is a primer like no other. In an inspired parodic twist, the two least Jewish characters in American literature spout some of the edgy, ironic Yiddishisms that have become part of the American vernacular. 35 full-color drawings.
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