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1 Hawthorne World History- Afghanistan and Pakistan

The Bookseller of Kabul

by

The Bookseller of Kabul Cover

ISBN13: 9780316734509
ISBN10: 0316734500
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Excerpt

The Proposal


When Sultan Khan thought the time had come to find himself a new wife, no one wanted to help him. First he approached his mother.

“You will have to make do with the one you have,” she said.

Then he went to his eldest sister. “I’m fond of your first wife,” she said. His other sisters replied in the same vein.

“It’s shaming for Sharifa,” said his aunt.

Sultan needed help. A suitor cannot himself ask for a girl’s hand. It is an Afghan custom that one of the women of the family convey the proposal and give the girl the once-over to assure herself that she is capable, well brought up, and suitable wife material. But none of Sultan’s close female relations wanted to have anything to do with this offer of marriage.

Sultan had picked out three young girls he thought might fit the bill. They were all healthy and good-looking, and of his own tribe. In Sultan’s family it was rare to marry outside the clan; it was considered prudent and safe to marry relatives, preferably cousins.

Sultan’s first candidate was sixteen-year-old Sonya. Her eyes were dark and almond-shaped and her hair shining black. She was shapely, voluptuous, and it was said of her that she was a good worker. Her family was poor and they were reasonably closely related. Her mother’s grandmother and Sultan’s mother’s grandmother were sisters.

While Sultan ruminated over how to ask for the hand of the chosen one without the help of family women, his first wife was blissfully ignorant that a mere chit of a girl, born the same year she and Sultan were married, was Sultan’s constant preoccupation. Sharifa was getting old. Like Sultan, she was a few years over fifty. She had borne him three sons and a daughter. The time had come for a man of Sultan’s standing to find a new wife.

“Do it yourself,” his brother said finally.

After some thought, Sultan realized that this was his only solution, and early one morning he made his way to the house of the sixteen-year-old. Her parents greeted him with open arms. Sultan was considered a generous man and a visit from him was always welcome. Sonya’s mother boiled water and made tea. They reclined on flat cushions in the mud cottage and exchanged pleasantries until Sultan thought the time had come to make his proposal.

“A friend of mine would like to marry Sonya,” he told the parents.

It was not the first time someone had asked for their daughter’s hand. She was beautiful and diligent, but they thought she was still a bit young. Sonya’s father was no longer able to work. During a brawl a knife had severed some of the nerves in his back. His beautiful daughter could be used as a bargaining chip in the marriage stakes, and he and his wife were always expecting the next bid to be even higher.

“He is rich,” said Sultan. “He’s in the same business as I am. He is well educated and has three sons. But his wife is starting to grow old.”

“What’s the state of his teeth?” the parents asked immediately, alluding to the friend’s age.

“About like mine,” said Sultan. “You be the judge.”

Old, the parents thought. But that was not necessarily a disadvantage. The older the man, the higher the price for their daughter. A bride’s price is calculated according to age, beauty, and skill and according to the status of the family.

When Sultan Khan had delivered his message, the parents said, as could be expected, “She is too young.”

Anything else would be to sell short to this rich, unknown suitor whom Sultan recommended so warmly. It would not do to appear too eager. But they knew Sultan would return; Sonya was young and beautiful.

He returned the next day and repeated the proposal. The same conversation, the same answers. But this time he got to meet Sonya, whom he had not seen since she was a young girl.

She kissed his hand, in the custom of showing respect for an elder relative, and he blessed the top of her head with a kiss. Sonya was aware of the charged atmosphere and flinched under Uncle Sultan’s searching look.

“I have found you a rich man, what do you think of that?” he asked. Sonya looked down at the floor. A young girl has no right to have an opinion about a suitor.

Sultan returned the third day, and this time he made known the suitor’s proposition: a ring, a necklace, earrings, and bracelet, all in red gold; as many clothes as she wanted; 600 pounds of rice, 300 pounds of cooking oil, a cow, a few sheep, and 15 million afghani, approximately $500.

Sonya’s father was more than satisfied with the price and asked to meet this mysterious man who was prepared to pay so much for his daughter. According to Sultan, he even belonged to their tribe, in spite of their not being able to place him or remember that they had ever met him.

“Tomorrow,” said Sultan, “I will show you a picture of him.”

The next day, fortified by a sweetener, Sultan’s aunt agreed to reveal to Sonya’s parents the identity of the suitor. She took a photograph with her—a picture of Sultan Khan himself—and with it the uncompromising message that they had no more than an hour to make up their minds. If the answer was yes, he would be very grateful, and if it was no, there would be no bad blood between them. What he wanted to avoid at all costs was everlasting bargaining about maybe, maybe not.

The parents agreed within the hour. They were keen on Sultan Khan, his money, and his position. Sonya sat in the attic and waited. When the mystery surrounding the suitor had been solved and the parents had decided to accept, her father’s brother came up to the attic. “Uncle Sultan is your wooer,” he said. “Do you consent?”

Not a sound escaped Sonya’s lips. With tearful eyes and bowed head, she hid behind her long shawl.

“Your parents have accepted the suitor,” her uncle said. “Now is your only chance to express an opinion.”

She was petrified, paralyzed by fear. She did not want the man but she knew she had to obey her parents. As Sultan’s wife, her standing in Afghan society would go up considerably. The bride money would solve many of her family’s problems. The money would help her parents buy good wives for their sons.

Sonya held her tongue, and with that her fate was sealed. To say nothing means to give one’s consent. The agreement was drawn up, the date fixed.

Sultan went home to inform his family of the news. His wife, Sharifa, his mother, and his sisters were seated around a dish of rice and spinach. Sharifa thought he was joking and laughed and cracked some jokes in return. His mother too laughed at Sultan’s joke. She could not believe that he had entered into a proposal of marriage without her blessing. The sisters were dumbfounded.

No one believed him, not until he showed them the kerchief and sweetmeats the parents of a bride give the suitor as proof of the engagement.

Sharifa cried for twenty days. “What have I done? What a disgrace. Why are you dissatisfied with me?”

Sultan told her to pull herself together. No one in the family backed him up, not even his own sons. Nevertheless, no one dared speak out against him—he always got his own way.

Sharifa was inconsolable. What really rankled was the fact that the man had picked an illiterate, someone who had not even completed nursery school. She, Sharifa, was a qualified Persian language teacher. “What has she got that I haven’t got?” she sobbed.

Sultan rose above his wife’s tears.

No one wanted to attend the engagement party. But Sharifa had to bite the bullet and dress up for the celebrations.

“I want everyone to see that you agree and support me. In the future we will all be living under the same roof and you must show that Sonya is welcome,” he demanded. Sharifa had always humored her husband, and now too, in this worst circumstance, giving him to someone else, she knuckled under. He even demanded that Sharifa should put the rings on his and Sonya’s fingers.

Twenty days after the proposal of marriage the solemn engagement ritual took place. Sharifa pulled herself together and put on a brave face. Her female relatives did their best to unsettle her. “How awful for you,” they said. “How badly he has treated you. You must be suffering.”

The wedding took place two months after the engagement, on the day of the Muslim New Year’s Eve. This time Sharifa refused to attend.

“I can’t,” she told her husband.

The female family members backed her up. No one bought new dresses or applied the normal amount of makeup required at wedding ceremonies. They wore simple coiffures and stiff smiles—in deference to the superannuated wife who would no longer share Sultan Khan’s bed. It was now reserved for the young, terrified bride—but they would all be under the same roof, until death did them part.


Copyright © 2002 by Åsne Seierstad

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Honest Critique, December 2, 2008 (view all comments by Honest Critique)
Very interesting read. This book presents a brutal look into the lives of an Afghani family. HOWEVER, be warned, despite what the tainted eyes of other Westerners would lead you to believe. This book is not unbiased. Seierstad attepts to remove herself from the story via point of view; however, Western biases in the POV of the characters involved is subtly intertwined within the novel, but blatantly obvious at times. This is not a typical Afghani family, and this is NOT nonfiction. The author often recieves information through 3rd to 5th or more string sources, and despite this, still interjects her own perception of what those people's thoughts were. In no way do I endorse the actions of the characters presented but do not be easily consumed by the authors pathos. Wonderful read, but DON'T be fooled into believing this book is what it assumes itself as.
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(45 of 47 readers found this comment helpful)
kps5, August 23, 2006 (view all comments by kps5)
An excellent book, detailed character sketches make the characters come to life, their thoughts, desires and aspirations are beautifully handled.
It was one of those books that, once picked up cannot be put down.An engrossing tale about the daily struggles, both personal and political faced by the resilient Afghans.
A must-read !!
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(7 of 12 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780316734509
Translator:
Christophersen, Ingrid
Publisher:
Back Bay Books
Translator:
Christophersen, Ingrid
Author:
Seierstad, Asne
Location:
Boston
Subject:
General
Subject:
Social life and customs
Subject:
Political
Subject:
Martial Arts & Self-Defense
Subject:
Afghanistan
Subject:
Martial arts
Subject:
Booksellers and bookselling
Subject:
Kåabol
Subject:
Ethnic Cultures - General
Subject:
Islamic Studies
Subject:
Asia - Central Asia
Subject:
Travel
Subject:
Kabul (Afghanistan)
Subject:
Khan family
Subject:
Biography-Ethnic Cultures
Subject:
Sociology-Islamic Studies
Subject:
International
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st U.S. ed.
Series Volume:
#1198
Publication Date:
20041026
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
7.34x5.29x1.02 in. .71 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
History and Social Science » Asia » Afghanistan
History and Social Science » Military » Gulf Wars
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » Sociology » Islamic Studies
History and Social Science » World History » Afghanistan and Pakistan
History and Social Science » World History » Asia » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Middle East

The Bookseller of Kabul Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316734509 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

In this remarkable portrait, Norwegian journalist Åsne Seierstad recounts with brutal honesty the day to day lives of one Afghani family persevering through life in a country beset by chaos. With the assent of the Khan family with whom she lives, Seierstad gives us intimate access to a world were women have few privileges, and where an attitude of hope seems uncommonly rare.

"Review" by , "[A]n astounding portrait....Seierstad's visceral account is equally seductive and repulsive...An international bestseller, it will likely stand as one of the best books of reportage of Afghan life after the fall of the Taliban."
"Review" by , "A slice of Afghanistan today, rendered with a talent for fine, sobering prose and strange, unnerving settings."
"Synopsis" by , - An international phenomenon. Translated into 17 languages, The Bookseller Of Kabul has become not only the bestselling nonfiction book ever published in the author's native Norway, but also a tremendous success throughout Europe and around the world.
- A book that honestly portrays real life behind the veil--and illuminates the plight of Afghan women as no other book does.
- Like the current bestseller Reading Lolita in Tehran, the paperback edition of The Bookseller of Kabul is certain to be popular with reading groups.
- Hardcover
"Synopsis" by , This mesmerizing portrait of a proud man who, through three decades and successive repressive regimes, heroically braved persecution to bring books to the people of Kabul has elicited extraordinary praise throughout the world and become a phenomenal international bestseller. The Bookseller of Kabul is startling in its intimacy and its details - a revelation of the plight of Afghan women and a window into the surprising realities of daily life in today's Afghanistan.
"Synopsis" by , With The Bookseller of Kabul, award-winning journalist Asne Seierstad has given readers a first-hand look at Afghani life as few outsiders have seen it. Invited to live with Sultan Khan, a bookseller in Kabul, and his family for months, this account of her experience allows the Khans to speak for themselves, giving us a genuinely gripping and moving portrait of a family, and of a country of great cultural riches and extreme contradictions. For more than 20 years, Sultan Khan has defied the authorities--whether Communist or Taliban--to supply books to the people of Kabul. He has been arrested, interrogated, and imprisoned, and has watched illiterate Taliban soldiers burn piles of his books in the street. Yet he had persisted in his passion for books, shedding light in one of the world's darkest places. This is the intimate portrait of a man of principle and of his family--two wives, five children, and many relatives sharing a small four-room house in this war ravaged city. But more than that, it is a rare look at contemporary life under Islam, where even after the Taliban's collapse, the women must submit to arranged marriages, polygamous husbands, and crippling limitations on their ability to travel, learn and communicate with others.
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