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The Lost Books of the Odyssey

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The Lost Books of the Odyssey Cover

ISBN13: 9780374192150
ISBN10: 0374192154
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Excerpt

1

A SAD REVELATION

Odysseus comes back to Ithaca in a little boat on a clear day. The familiarity of the east face of the island seems absurd—bemused, he runs a tricky rip current he has not thought about in fifteen years and lands by the mouth of a creek where he swam as a boy. All his impatience leaves him and he sits under an oak he remembers whose branches overhang the water, good for diving. Twenty years have gone by, he reflects, what are a few more minutes. An hour passes in silence and it occurs to him that he is tired and might as well go home, so he picks up his sword and walks toward his house, sure that whatever obstacles await will be minor compared to what he has been through.

The house looks much as it did when he left. He notices that the sheep byres gate has been mended. A rivulet of smoke rises from the chimney. He steals lightly in, hand on sword, thinking how ridiculous it would be to come so far and lose everything in a moment of carelessness.

Within, Penelope is at her loom and an old man drowses by the fire. Odysseus stands in the doorway for a while before Penelope notices him and shrieks, dropping her shuttle and before she draws another breath running and embracing him, kissing him and wetting his cheeks with her tears. Welcome home, she says into his chest.

The man by the fire stands up looking possessive and pitifully concerned and in an intuitive flash Odysseus knows that this is her husband. The idea is absurd—the man is soft, grey and heavy, no hero and never was one, would not have lasted an hour in the blinding glare before the walls of Troy. He looks at Penelope to confirm his guess and notices how she has aged—her hips wider, her hair more grey than not, the skin around her eyes traced with fine wrinkles. Without the eyes of home-coming there is only an echo of her beauty. She steps back from him and traces a deep scar on his shoulder and her wonder and the old mans fear become a mirror—he realizes that with his blackened skin, tangled beard and body lean and hard from years of war he looks like a reaver, a revenant, a wolf of the sea.

Willfully composed, Penelope puts her hand on his shoulder and says that he is most welcome in his hall. Then her face collapses into tears and she says she did not think he was coming back, had been told he was dead these last eight years, had given up a long time ago, had waited as long as she could, longer than anyone thought was right.

He had spent the days of his exile imagining different homecoming scenarios but it had never occurred to him that she would just give up. The town deserted, his house overrun by violent suitors, Penelope dying, or dead and burned, but not this. "Such a long trip," he thinks, "and so many places I could have stayed along the way."

Then, mercifully, revelation comes. He realizes that this is not Penelope. This is not his hall. This is not Ithaca—what he sees before him is a vengeful illusion, the deception of some malevolent god. The real Ithaca is elsewhere, somewhere on the sea- roads, hidden. Giddy, Odysseus turns and flees the tormenting shadows.

2

 
THE OTHER ASSASSIN

 
In the Imperial Court of Agamemnon, the serene, the lofty, the disingenuous, the elect of every corner of the empire, there were three viziers, ten consuls, twenty generals, thirty admirals, fifty hierophants, a hundred assassins, eight hundred administrators of the second degree, two thousand administrators of the third and clerks, soldiers, courtesans, scholars, painters, musicians, beggars, larcenists, arsonists, stranglers, sycophants and hangers- on of no particular description beyond all number, all poised to do the bright, the serene, the etc. emperor's will. It so happened that in the twentieth year of his reign Agamemnon's noble brow clouded at the thought of a certain Odysseus, whom he felt was much too much renowned for cleverness, when both cleverness and renown he preferred to reserve for the throne. While it was true that this Odysseus had made certain contributions to a recent campaign, involving the feigned offering of a horse which had facilitated stealthy entry into an enemy city, this did not justify the infringement on the royal prerogatives, and in any case, the war had long since been brought to a satisfactory conclusion, so Agamemnon called for the clerk of Suicides, Temple Offerings, Investitures, Bankruptcy and Humane and Just Liquidation, and signed Odysseus's death warrant.

The clerk of Suicides etc. bowed and with due formality passed the document to the General who Holds Death in His Right Hand, who annotated it, stamped it, and passed it to the Viceroy of Domestic Matters Involving Mortality and so on through the many twists and turns of the bureaucracy, through the hands of spymasters, career criminals, blind assassins, mendacious clerics and finally to the lower ranks of advisors who had been promoted to responsibility for their dedication and competence (rare qualities given their low wages and the contempt with which they were treated by their well-connected or nobly born superiors), one of whom noted it was a death order of high priority and without reading it assigned it to that master of battle and frequent servant of the throne, Odysseus.
 
A messenger came to Ithaca and gave Odysseus his orders. Odysseus read them, his face closed, and thanked the messenger, commenting that the intended victim was in for a surprise, and that he was morally certain no problems would arise on his end.
 
On the eight succeeding days Odysseus sent the following messages to the court as protocol required:
 
“I am within a day's sail of his island.”

“I walk among people who know him and his habits.”

 
“I am within ten miles of his house.”

“Five miles.”

“One.”

 
“I am at his gate.”

“The full moon is reflected in the silver mirror over his bed. The silence is perfect but for his breathing.”

 
“I am standing over his bed holding a razor flecked with his blood. Before the cut he looked into my face and swore to slay the man who ordered his death. I think that as a whispering shade he will do no harm.”

Excerpted from The Lost Books of The Odyssey by Zachary Mason.

Copyright © 2007, 2010 by Zachary Mason.

Published in 2010 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Molly Samuel, January 2, 2011 (view all comments by Molly Samuel)
The Lost Books of the Odyssey experiments with storytelling, with well-known characters, with epic tropes. The different versions of the story of the Odyssey are adventurous, sensitive, wily. The book is like Odysseus himself, who I think about differently having read it.
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dougawells, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by dougawells)
I loved this book. Excellent writing, wonderful re-telling of stories that we all know. One of the best books of the year.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Stephen Teso, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by Stephen Teso)
How brave must you be to addd new chapters to a timeless classic - brave enough to be brilliant and bold enough to add a new vision that transforms and comments on the nature of myth, truth and illusion.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780374192150
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Mason, Zachary
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20100202
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.27 x 5.48 x 0.64 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Greek
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Humanities » Mythology » Folklore and Storytelling

The Lost Books of the Odyssey Used Hardcover
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Product details 240 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374192150 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Mason's fantastic first novel, a deft reimagining of Homer's Odyssey, begins with the story as we know it before altering the perspective or fate of the characters in subsequent short story — like chapters. Legendary moments of myth are played differently throughout, as when Odysseus forgoes the Trojan horse, or when the Cyclops — here a gentle farmer — is blinded by Odysseus while he burgles the Cyclops's cave. Mason's other life — as a computer scientist — informs some chapters, such as 'The Long Way Back' in which Daedalus's labyrinth ensnares Theseus in a much different way. Part of what makes this so enjoyable is the firm grasp Mason has on the source material; the footnotes double as humorous asides while reminding readers who aren't familiar with the original that, for instance, Eumaios is 'the swineherd who sheltered Odysseus when he first returned to Ithaca and later helped him kill the suitors.' This original work consistently surprises and delights." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[A] dazzling debut....Stunning and hypnotic....[Mason] has written a series of jazzy, post-modernist variations on the Odyssey, and in doing so he's created an ingeniously Borgesian novel that's witty, playful, moving and tirelessly inventive....This is a book that not only addresses the themes of Homer's classic — the dangers of pride, the protean nature of identity, the tryst between fate and free will — but also poses new questions to the reader about art and originality and the nature of storytelling."
"Review" by , "Spellbinding. In his versions of these ancient myths, Mason twists and jinks, renegotiating the journey to Ithaca with all the guile and trickery of Odysseus himself. Rarely is it so reassuring to be in the hands of such an unreliable narrator."
"Review" by , "A subtle, inventive, and moving meditation on the nature of story and what Louis MacNeice calls 'the drunkenness of things being various.'"
"Review" by , "Mason's delightful, inventive collection takes the raw materials of Homer — wily Odysseus, faithful Penelope, wrathful Poseidon — and then recombines, warps and twists elements of his well-worn tale."
"Review" by , "[A] literary adventure in which everything — the hero, the author, even the reader — is up for grabs...The epic as kaleidoscope."
"Review" by , "Though none of these brilliantly conceived revisions fits neatly into Homer's classic poem, each resonates with something of the artistic vigor of the ancient original....A daring and successful experiment in fictional technique."
"Synopsis" by , Mason's beguiling debut novel reimagines Homer's classic story of the hero Odysseus and his long journey home after the fall of Troy.
"Synopsis" by ,

A New York Times Bestseller

A New York Times Book Review Editors Choice

Zachary Masons brilliant and beguiling debut novel reimagines Homers classic story of the hero Odysseus and his long journey home after the fall of Troy. With hypnotic prose, terrific imagination, and dazzling literary skill, Mason creates alternative episodes, fragments, and revisions of Homers original that, taken together, open up this classic Greek myth to endless reverberating interpretations. The Lost Books of the Odyssey is punctuated with great wit, beauty, and playfulness; it is a daring literary page-turner that marks the emergence of an extraordinary new talent.

"Synopsis" by ,
A BRILLIANT AND BEGUILING REIMAGINING OF ONE OF OUR GREATEST MYTHS BY A GIFTED YOUNG WRITER

Zachary Masons brilliant and beguiling debut novel, The Lost Books of the Odyssey, reimagines Homers classic story of the hero Odysseus and his long journey home after the fall of Troy. With brilliant prose, terrific imagination, and dazzling literary skill, Mason creates alternative episodes, fragments, and revisions of Homers original that taken together open up this classic Greek myth to endless reverberating interpretations. The Lost Books of the Odyssey is punctuated with great wit, beauty, and playfulness; it is a daring literary page-turner that marks the emergence of an extraordinary new talent.
Zachary Mason is a computer scientist specializing in artificial intelligence. He was a finalist for the 2008 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award. He lives in California.
The Lost Books of the Odyssey reimagines Homers classic story of the hero Odysseus and his long journey home after the fall of Troy. With brilliant prose, terrific imagination, and dazzling literary skill, Mason creates alternative episodes, fragments, and revisions of Homers original that, taken together, open up this classic Greek myth to endless reverberating interpretations. The Lost Books of the Odyssey is punctuated with great wit, beauty, and playfulness; it is a daring literary page-turner that marks the emergence of an extraordinary new talent.
“[A] dazzling debut . . . Stunning and hypnotic . . . Mr. Mason . . . has written a series of jazzy, post-modernist variations on the Odyssey, and in doing so hes created an ingeniously Borgesian novel thats witty, playful, moving and tirelessly inventive . . . This is a book that not only addresses the themes of Homers classic—the dangers of pride, the protean nature of identity, the tryst between fate and free will—but also poses new questions to the reader about art and originality and the nature of storytelling.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“[The Lost Books of the Odyssey] is, to my surprise, a wonderful book. I had expected it to be rather preening, and probably thin. But it is intelligent, absorbing, wonderfully written, and perhaps the most revelatory and brilliant prose encounter with Homer since James Joyce.”—Simon Goldhill, The Times Literary Supplement

“A subtle, inventive, and moving meditation on the nature of story and what Louis MacNeice calls ‘the drunkenness of things being various.”—John Banville, Booker Prize–winning author of The Sea

“Spellbinding. In his versions of these ancient myths, Mason twists and jinks, renegotiating the journey to Ithaca with all the guile and trickery of Odysseus himself. Rarely is it so reassuring to be in the hands of such an unreliable narrator.”—Simon Armitage, author of The Odyssey: A Dramatic Retelling of Homers Epic

“Beautifully written, intelligent, war-inflected in all the most ancient and contemporary ways . . . An ambitious feast!”—Carole Maso, author of Ava and The Art Lover

“A stirring revelation: Zachary Masons astounding glosses of the Odyssey plunge us into an unforeseeable and hypnotic dimension of fiction. Of the three possible interpretations of the work that he proposes—Homeric stories anciently reproduced by recombining their components, a Theosophist dream of abstract mathematics, and pure illusion (that is, it was all made up by him)—the result is one and the same. This enthralling book is his doing, whether as translator, conjuror, or author. I vote for number three.”—Harry Mathews, author of My Life in CIA

“Masons delightful, inventive collection takes the raw materials of Homer—wily Odysseus, faithful Penelope, wrathful Poseidon—and then recombines, warps and twists elements of his well-worn tale.”—Philadelphia City Paper

“Masons fantastic first novel, a deft reimagining of Homers Odyssey, begins with the story as we know it before altering the perspective or fate of the characters in subsequent short story–like chapters . . . This original work consistently surprises and delights.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“These imaginary lost books of The Odyssey enhance Homers epic tale with alternative scenarios and viewpoints. A finalist this year for the New York Public Librarys Young Lions Award, Mason employs clear, crisp prose and a clever sense of humor to propel the action briskly . . . A paean to the power of storytelling.”—Library Journal

“Though none of these brilliantly conceived revisions fits neatly into Homers classic poem, each resonates with something of the artistic vigor of the ancient original . . . A daring and successful experiment in fictional technique.”—Booklist

“[A] literary adventure in which everything—the hero, the author, even the reader—is up for grabs . . . The epic as kaleidoscope.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Reading Zachary Masons forthcoming The Lost Books of the Odyssey, Ive been in danger of missing my subway stop . . . Funny, spooky, action-packed, philosophical—the mood keeps shifting, and you keep wanting to read just one more.”—Barnes and Noble Review

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