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Other titles in the Inheritance series:

Eldest (Inheritance Cycle #02)

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Eldest (Inheritance Cycle #02) Cover

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. History and Beliefs

- Compare the different historic traditions of Alagaësia as they are explained in Eldest. Why do the dwarves, the elves, and the humans all have such different mythologies? What do their stories tell us about each of their races?

- What does Saphira tell Eragon about the dragons beliefs in Eldest? Compare what the dragons believe with what the dwarves and elves do.

- After reading Eldest, explain the origins of the animosity among the races of dragons, elves, dwarves, and humans. What are the effects of those ancient wars on the present day situation in Alagaësia?

- Why are the elves vegetarians? Why does Eragon become a vegetarian after living with them and studying with Oromis in Eldest?

- Compare the ways the different races live-the elves in the forest, the dwarves in their caves, the humans in cities and towns. How does the habitat of each of these peoples affect their way of life and their connection with their environment?

2. Family and Home

- Discuss who his parents might be. Why is his fathers identity a mystery, and why did his mother bring him to her brother to raise and then disappear? How does the readers understanding change after reading Eldest?

- What was Eragons life like before he found the dragons egg in the Spine in Eragon? How did his discovery of the egg change his life?

- Why was Eragon comfortable exploring the Spine when everyone else in his village was afraid of the place? What does the Spine represent to the other inhabitants of Carvahall? How does Roran convince them to overcome those fears in Eldest?

- Is it hard for Roran to convince the villagers to leave their homes in Eldest? What does he hope to find for them when they do leave? Why do some insist on staying behind?

- Does Nasuada take control of the Varden because she is Ajihads daughter or because she has special qualities of leadership? Compare Nasuadas relationship with her father in Eragon with Aryas relationship with Islanzadí in Eldest.

- Why does Hrothgar make Eragon a member of his clan before he leaves Farthen Dûr in Eldest? What does this mean to Eragon?

- What feelings do Eragon and Roran experience when they meet again at the end of Eldest? Why is Roran so angry with Eragon? Can he forgive Eragon for Garrows death?

- When Murtagh tells Eragon who he really is at the end of Eldest, what effect does it have on him? Do you think what Murtagh tells him is true? What does it mean for Eragons future?

- In the last chapter of Eldest, Eragon thinks: “Fathers, mothers, brothers, cousins . . . It all comes down to family.” What does he mean? Who is Eragons true family? Where has he found his greatest sense of belonging?

3. Destiny and Responsibility

- The first line of Eragon reads: “Wind howled through the night, carrying a scent that would change the world.” What does this opening tell you about the meaning of destiny in the tale? What does the author mean by a “scent that would change the world”?

- Discuss the importance of names in Christopher Paolinis novels. How does it affect Eragon to learn that his name was also the name of the first dragon rider? How does he choose Saphiras name in the first book? In Eldest, how is Eragon affected by others calling him “Shadeslayer”? How has Galbatorix gained control over Murtagh and why is that control so complete?

- What does Saphira mean in Eragon when she says, “It is our destiny to attempt the impossible, to accomplish great deeds regardless of fear. It is our responsibility to the future.” Is this true for everyone? What is the responsibility of each of us to the future?

- In Eragon, Angela the fortuneteller says, “To know ones fate can be a terrible thing.” Would you want to know your future if someone could tell you? Why does Eragon decide to hear her predictions? What does she mean when she says, “That freedom [to choose your fate] is a gift, but it is also a responsibility more binding than chains”? Which of her predictions (in the chapter titled “The Witch and the Werecat”) actually come true as the story continues in Eldest?

- How does it affect Roran when people start to call him “Stronghammer” in Eldest? Why does Roran take most of the village of Carvahall with him in his quest to rescue Katrina?

- How does Eragon change in the course of his studies with Oromis in Eldest? Which of his new powers are the result of hard training and which are the result of learning more about the use of magic? Is he, indeed, fulfilling a destiny or responding to his sense of duty and responsibility-or both?

4. Trust and Fear

- In Eragon, how does Eragon know that he can trust Brom enough to travel with him? Why does he leave his home and all that is familiar to him?

- Who are the Razac and what do they represent to Eragon when he first encounters them in Eragon? Why do the Razac return to Carvahall in Eldest? Why do they take Katrina away with them? Is it trust or fear that makes the people of Carvahall follow Roran into the wilderness?

- In the first book, when Eragon realizes that Arya is an elf, does it change his feelings about her? Why does he rescue her from the prison even though it puts his own safety in jeopardy? What is it that keeps Arya from returning Eragons affection in Eldest?

- When Eragon finds the stronghold of the Varden in the first book he is challenged and his mind probed by the Twins. Why did Ajihad trust the Twins? Are there clues in Eragon to indicate that the Twins were actually working for Galbatorix, as we discover in Eldest?

- How does Eragon feel when he learns about Murtaghs parentage in Eragon? Does the fact that Murtaghs father was Morzan affect Eragons trust of him? Does it affect your feelings about his character? What does Eragon feel when he realizes who he is fighting at the end of Eldest? Will he ever be able to trust Murtagh again?

- What is Eragons greatest fear? What is Rorans greatest fear? Do their fears affect the way they act and interact with others? Discuss their reunion in the last chapter of Eldest. Why does Roran strike Eragon? How do they regain their trust for each other?

5. Use and Abuse of Power

- In Eldest, Oromis says: “As Galbatorix has demonstrated, power without moral direction is the most dangerous force in the world.” What does he mean by this? By the end of Eldest what other characters have “power without moral direction”?

- Discuss the connection of magic to power in this story. Why does Eragon have to learn the use of magic so slowly, first from Brom (in Eragon) and then from Oromis (in Eldest)? Who are the other characters that can use magic and what are the limits on their magical powers?

- Why does the use of magic drain the energy of the person performing the magic? What are the ways that Eragon learns to control his use of magic and his energy in Eldest?

- In Eldest, is Murtagh able to use magic more effectively than Eragon? Why do you think this is so?

6. Good and Evil

- Many fantasy novels deal with the struggle between forces of good and evil. Discuss the ways in which the Inheritance books explore this theme and which characters represent good and which represent evil. Are there some characters that you are still not sure about by the end of Eldest?

- Eragon begins with the Shade and his ruthless ambush of the elf we later learn is Arya. How did this Prologue affect your anticipation of the story to come? Why is the Prologue titled “Shade of Fear”? What do we learn of the Shades past when he is killed at the end of Eragon?

- How did Galbatorix establish his rule of Alagaësia? According to the history Brom shares in Eragon, what experiences turned Galbatorix into a cruel and feared ruler?

- The Urgals seem to be completely ruthless, yet Eragon is hesitant to kill them with his magic in Eragon. In the chapter called “A Costly Mistake,” why does he only use his magic to stun them? Why is he so upset when Murtagh kills Torkenbrand, the slave trader? By the end of Eldest, Eragon has different feelings about the Urgals. What has changed his mind?

- In Eldest Roran commits crimes in his efforts to save the people of Carvahall who have placed their trust in him; he kills, steals, and uses trickery to get what he needs. Can he justify what he has done in the name of helping others? How does he feel about the men he has killed?

- Why is Oromis so angry about the blessing that Eragon gave to the child in Farthen Dûr? What is the place of Elva in the story by the end of Eldest? Is her blessing/curse a force for good or for evil? How can it work both ways?

7. Character Study

- Compare Eragon and his cousin Roran. How do Eragons and Rorans journeys in Eldest parallel each other and how are they different? Describe the changes in each of them from the beginning of Eragon to the end of Eldest. What influences are most important on their growth? Which people and events are most important to their development?

- Compare Brom (in Eragon) and Oromis (in Eldest). How are they similar and how are they different? What does each of them contribute to Eragons training? Which of them, do you think, has the most influence on Eragons growth as a Rider?

- How would you describe Arya? Why does Arya reject Eragons romantic feelings in Eldest? What aspects of her personality contribute to their friendship and what keeps them from having a romantic relationship? How does Arya feel about being the daughter of the queen?

- Compare the magical qualities of Angela and Elva as we see them in Eldest. What do we know about each of them and how do their magical abilities contribute to the story? How do you feel about these characters-in terms of their trustworthiness?

- Compare the leadership styles of Nasuada and Orrin, the king of Surda, in Eldest. Why do the Varden go to Surda, and what help do they expect from Orrin?

- Describe the character of Saphira. How has she grown from the time she was a hatchling? What does she learn from Glaedr and how does she grow during her training? What are some of the difficult feelings and pain that Saphira and Eragon share? What are some of the joys that they share?

8. One Step Beyond: Predictions

- Do you think Eragon will ever be able to return to the Palancar Valley and Carvahall? He longs for his home in the midst of his adventures, but will he and Roran be able to return to the farm when their adventures are over?

- At the end of the first book, Eragon hears a voice in his head, someone helping him to escape the horrors of Durzas memories. In Eldest, we learn that person is Oromis, who will become Eragons trainer. What foreshadowing comes at the end of Eldest? Predict some of the plot of Book Three of Inheritance. What do you expect to happen?

- Who are the characters that might play a major role in the next book? Will Eragon come face-to-face with Galbatorix? Will he fight Murtagh again? Will Eragon and Roran be able to rescue Katrina? Who will provide the most assistance to Eragon?

- Why do you think Galbaltorix continues to gain strength, and how is he able to make Murtagh stronger than Eragon? How do you think Eragon and Saphira can develop the strength to combat the evil powers of Galbatorix?

9. Connecting Fantasy to Real Life

- What kinds of good and evil do you hear about in the news of our world? Discuss examples from news stories that report events representing the good and evil in our society and in international news.

- What circumstances can bring people together to become friends and what can make those friendships grow and develop? What circumstances can hurt a friendship? What are some of the ways people have difficulty with family members?

- Do you feel that some people have a destiny to fulfill or a special reason for living? Name people in history who had a strong responsibility to a cause for good or evil. (Possibilities might be Abraham Lincoln, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King for good causes and Attila the Hun, Adolf Hitler, and Josef Stalin for evil.)

- Name some characters from legend, literature, or film who represent the causes of good or evil. (Possibilities might be Luke Skywalker, King Arthur, Frodo for good; Darth Vader, Mordred, Sauron for evil.)

Guide prepared by Connie Rockman, Childrens Literature Consultant, adjunct professor of literature for youth, and editor of the Junior Authors and Illustrators series (H.W. Wilson).

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 10 comments:

gken703, November 27, 2006 (view all comments by gken703)
The Inheritance books are the best fantasy books that I have ever read along with Harry Potter. They make you want to read all of the book at once without stopping. They keep you on the edge of your seat turning the pages furiously. I absolutely cannot wait for the third book. He makes you wonder over and over what will happen in the next chapter and the next book. I cant wait until the third book comes out! I will probably keep reading them over and over until the third book comes out. I think that Christopher Paolini is a great author, better than many. I just hope he hurries up with the third book. I don't know how much longer I can wait. Hurry up Christopher!
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(29 of 47 readers found this comment helpful)
bonnell, November 22, 2006 (view all comments by bonnell)
omg eldest and eragon are the best books ive ever read i read both of them in 8 days and im only 13 its crazy i just cant get enough of these books i love them
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(22 of 47 readers found this comment helpful)
arothCA, November 14, 2006 (view all comments by arothCA)
LIKE IT'S PREDECESSOR, A PERMANENT FIXTURE OF MY LIBRARY, A WORTHY SUCCESSOR FOR THOSE IN NEED OF A HARRY FIX, U KNOW WHO YOU ARE!! NOT JUST FOR KIDS, I'M 32 AND UNASHAMED!! BRING IT ON CHRIS I CAN TAKE IT!
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780375826702
Author:
Paolini, Christopher
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers
Author:
ristopher Paolini
Author:
Ch
Subject:
Action & Adventure
Subject:
Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Magic
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - Fantasy
Subject:
Fantasy
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - Science Fiction
Subject:
Dragons
Subject:
Action & Adventure - General
Subject:
Fantasy & Magic
Subject:
Children s-Science Fiction and Fantasy
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
The Inheritance Cycle
Series Volume:
02
Publication Date:
August 2005
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
704
Dimensions:
9.46x6.24x2.10 in. 2.42 lbs.
Age Level:
12-17

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Related Subjects


Children's » Action and Adventure » Adventure Stories
Children's » Animals » Mythical
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Science Fiction and Fantasy » General
Young Adult » General

Eldest (Inheritance Cycle #02) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 704 pages Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers - English 9780375826702 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

In his online newsletter Alagaesia, Christopher Paolini shares, "Writing Eldest was one of the hardest things I've ever done, as was writing Eragon, although in different ways. I pushed myself with Eldest, both in terms of the characters, the story, and what I attempted with my technique....[T]he completion of my second novel marks the end and beginning of an era for me."

All the hard work and determination really paid off — Eldest delivers! The deft young author's writing has matured giving the second story in the trilogy more depth, as well as successfully building further anticipation for the conclusion of the series. I'm not letting out any spoilers... Just get the book. Read it. Love it!

"Staff Pick" by ,

Fantasy lovers still recovering from the post-Harry Potter blues will find some much needed late-summer relief in these pages. Eldest, Christopher Paolini's accomplished sequel to his bestselling Eragon, continues the story with excitement and skill, expanding Paolini's imaginary world — and, as the story unfolds, the devoloping voice of its young author is revealed. Of all the swell young adult fantasies currently filling bookstore shelves this summer, Eldest is the swellest!

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This phone-book size second helping in Paolini's planned Inheritance Trilogy picks up with the battle-scarred but conquering hero, first introduced in Eragon, and his dragon, Saphira. As the novel opens, the two are neck-deep in political intrigue over choosing a successor to replace Ajihad, the Varden's slain leader. The scope of the story expands when Eragon and Arya, the elfin ambassador he not-so-secretly lusts after, head to Ellesmra so he can complete his training as a Rider. Eragon's cousin, Roran, makes a more perilous journey, leading the townspeople of Carvahall in pursuit of the villain Galbatorix and his cronies, who have kidnapped Roran's fiance — hoping to bait Eragon and Saphira. The narrative shifts occasionally to follow the troubles plaguing Nasuada, Ajihad's daughter, who now leads the Varden. Fans of the first volume will find even more of the same here: a wealth of descriptive detail, mythic archetypes and prolonged battle sequences. Here, the inspiration sometimes seems less Tolkien than Star Wars (Eragon says 'Yes, Master' frequently). The most affecting element remains the tender relationship between dragon and Rider, and teens will empathize as the object of Eragon's affection (repeatedly) spurns him, his teacher humbles him and he struggles with questions about God and vegetarianism. Readers who persevere are rewarded with walloping revelations in the final pages, including the meaning of the title and the identity of the red dragon on the cover. The story leaves off with a promise — To Be Continued. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Once again, the expected fantasy elements are well in place, and the characters and their relationships continue to develop nicely. The ending promises an even more cataclysmic battle ahead."
"Review" by , "Eldest shows literary growth but is bogged down by inconsistent pacing and an overwrought, archaic style....It's a fine world to escape into. One wishes only that it were grander."
"Review" by , "I have not for many a year read anything so mind-numbingly silly as Eldest....Malarkey like this might be forgiven if it were hitched to a fast-moving narrative. But Paolini dawdles, with long, self-indulgent asides about the proper components of a dwarfish bow... (Grade: D+)"
"Review" by , "Eldest roars along from beginning to end. The author's writing has matured and he has developed great skill at layering his themes as they build to an exciting climax."
"Review" by , "Suffused with purple prose and faux-archaic language, this patchwork of dialogue, characters and concepts pulled whole cloth from the fantasy canon holds together remarkably well....Derivative but exciting."
"Review" by , "Not that Eldest is all bad (although in places it is very bad). It's a good story, if way too familiar....The high points of Eldest are a little higher than Eragon; the low points, unfortunately, are just as low."
"Review" by , "The plot and characters are largely derivative, not just of Tolkien but of Anne McCaffrey, Ursula K. Le Guin and others...and the prose is often hackneyed and in need of pruning....Eldest isn't extraordinary, though it has its extraordinary moments."
"Review" by , "Aside from a tendency to wax flowery...and a sad lack of humor, Christopher Paolini largely delivers on the plot of his followup to the bestseller Eragon....The book is too long by about 200 pages, but Paolini has created a likable hero, and fantasy buffs should enjoy Eldest... (Grade: C+)"
"Review" by , "[R]emarkable...[an] intricate plot and meticulously built fantasy world....The story is richly detailed in parts, logically laying down elements of magic and folklore....This is a series worth reading..."
"Review" by , "Paolini's lush writing and close attention to detail make this epic flow effortlessly, leaving readers to wait impatiently again for the third and final book of the trilogy."
"Review" by , "Paolini provides a worthy companion to Eragon....The plot — indeed, most of the fantasy conventions — is heavily inspired by Tolkien, McCaffrey, and especially George Lucas....While there's nothing particularly original here, the book will find its fan-base."
"Synopsis" by , Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have just saved the rebel state from destruction by the mighty forces of King Galbatorix, cruel ruler of the Empire. Now Eragon must travel to Ellesmera, land of the elves, for further training in the skills of the Dragon Rider: magic and swordsmanship.
"Synopsis" by , Darkness falls...despair abounds...evil reigns...

Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have just saved the rebel state from destruction by the mighty forces of King Galbatorix, cruel ruler of the Empire. Now Eragon must travel to Ellesmera, land of the elves, for further training in the skills of the Dragon Rider: magic and swordsmanship. Soon he is on the journey of a lifetime, his eyes open to awe-inspring new places and people, his days filled with fresh adventure. But chaos and betrayal plague him at every turn, and nothing is what it seems. Before long, Eragon doesn't know whom he can trust.

Meanwhile, his cousin Roran must fight a new battle — one that might put Eragon in even graver danger.

Will the king's dark hand strangle all resistance? Eragon may not escape with even his life...

"Synopsis" by , With the highly anticipated publication of Book Three in the Inheritance cycle, Brisingr, the hardcover editions of all three books will be available in a handsome boxed set!
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