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1 Beaverton Children's Activities- Architecture

Sky Boys: How They Built the Empire State Building

by

Sky Boys: How They Built the Empire State Building Cover

ISBN13: 9780375836107
ISBN10: 0375836101
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $10.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The acclaimed team behind the award-winning "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt" is back with the riveting story of how one of the most amazing accomplishments in American architecture came to be. Illustrations.

Review:

"A second-person narrative voice places readers at the construction site of (at that time) the world's tallest skyscraper. From the first line, 'It's the end of winter,/ and your pop's lost his job,' the grim realities of the Depression form the story's backdrop. Opening spreads show a boy collecting firewood from 'that old hotel/ they tore down at/ Thirty-fourth and Fifth.' Hopkinson (Fannie in the Kitchen) infuses an emotional charge in her dramatization of the building's erection ('a symbol of hope/ in the darkest of times'), while also folding technical details into lyrical prose: 'First come rumbling flatbed trucks,/ bundles of steel on their backs,/ like a gleaming, endless river/ surging through/ the concrete canyons of Manhattan.' Ransome's oil paintings, in hues of blue, gray and russet brown, capture the scale and increasing elevation at which the 'sky boys' worked. Framed against white clouds, men stand precariously on steel scaffolding. One spread, divided into vertical quarters, shows the building's progress in June, July, August and November; the next, a climactic vertical spread, boldly labeled '5:42 pm March 18, 1931,' depicts workers stationed on the pinnacle mast, an American flag billowing behind them. Photographs of the site's actual construction decorate the endpapers, and an endnote offers even more details. The subplot about the father and son (who tour the completed building at the book's close) seems tacked on, but the drama of the building's rise makes for a literally riveting account. Ages 4-9." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

About the Author

Deborah Hopkinson is the author of A Boy Called Dickens and the ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book Abe Lincoln Crosses a Creek. Her other titles include Apples to Oregon, Under the Quilt of Night (also illustrated by James E. Ransome), and Fannie in the Kitchen. She lives in Oregon.

James E. Ransome is the illustrator of many highly acclaimed titles for children, including The Creation by James Weldon Johnson, which won a Coretta Scott King Award for illustration, and Let My People Go by Patricia McKissack, winner of an NAACP Image Award. His other titles include Major Taylor, Young Pele and Before There Was Mozart, all three written by Lesa Cline-Ransome. He lives in New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Deborah Hopkinson, October 3, 2006 (view all comments by Deborah Hopkinson)
I hope readers will enjoy this book. It has received the following honors:

Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Book
Oregon Book Award Finalist, 2006
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(8 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375836107
Author:
Ransone, James
Author:
Ransome, James
Illustrator:
Ransone, James
Author:
Ransome, James E.
Author:
illustrated by James Ransome
Author:
illustrated by James Ransone
Publisher:
Schwartz & Wade Books
Subject:
Children's 4-8 - Picturebooks
Subject:
History
Subject:
Building
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Art (painting sculpture artists architecture etc.)
Subject:
Children's 4-8 - Fiction - Historical
Subject:
Historical - United States - 20th Century
Subject:
New York (N.Y.) History 1898-1951.
Subject:
Skyscrapers
Subject:
Children s Art-General
Subject:
empire state building;new york city;picture book;construction;great depression;new york;historical fiction;history;skyscrapers;fiction;building;buildings;colophon
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Picture book
Publication Date:
20060231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from P up to 4
Language:
English
Illustrations:
YES
Pages:
48
Dimensions:
11.76x8.44x.45 in. 1.01 lbs.
Children's Book Type:
Picture / Wordless
Age Level:
04-08

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Related Subjects

Children's » Activities » Architecture
Children's » Architecture
Children's » Art » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Nonfiction » US History
Featured Titles » General

Sky Boys: How They Built the Empire State Building Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.50 In Stock
Product details 48 pages Schwartz & Wade Books - English 9780375836107 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A second-person narrative voice places readers at the construction site of (at that time) the world's tallest skyscraper. From the first line, 'It's the end of winter,/ and your pop's lost his job,' the grim realities of the Depression form the story's backdrop. Opening spreads show a boy collecting firewood from 'that old hotel/ they tore down at/ Thirty-fourth and Fifth.' Hopkinson (Fannie in the Kitchen) infuses an emotional charge in her dramatization of the building's erection ('a symbol of hope/ in the darkest of times'), while also folding technical details into lyrical prose: 'First come rumbling flatbed trucks,/ bundles of steel on their backs,/ like a gleaming, endless river/ surging through/ the concrete canyons of Manhattan.' Ransome's oil paintings, in hues of blue, gray and russet brown, capture the scale and increasing elevation at which the 'sky boys' worked. Framed against white clouds, men stand precariously on steel scaffolding. One spread, divided into vertical quarters, shows the building's progress in June, July, August and November; the next, a climactic vertical spread, boldly labeled '5:42 pm March 18, 1931,' depicts workers stationed on the pinnacle mast, an American flag billowing behind them. Photographs of the site's actual construction decorate the endpapers, and an endnote offers even more details. The subplot about the father and son (who tour the completed building at the book's close) seems tacked on, but the drama of the building's rise makes for a literally riveting account. Ages 4-9." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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