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Naomi and Ely's No Kiss List

by and

Naomi and Ely's No Kiss List Cover

 

 

Excerpt

NAOMI

Shiver

I lie all the time.

I lied to Mrs. Loy from the fourteenth floor when I assured her that I walked her dog three times a day and watered her plants while she went to Atlantic City to win the money for her sons sad operation (or for her own elective plastic surgery— Im not sure).

I lied to the co-op board of my familys apartment building about my moms episode that left our living room wall in partial collapse soon after Dad left. I also backed up Moms lies to the board that wed pay for the damage. Monkeys will fly outta my butt before well be able to come up with the money to fix the fallout. The way I figure, if Mom and I arent bothered living in ruins, why should the co-op board care?

I lied to the NYU Admissions Committee that I care about my future and my education. Im barely a year out of high school, and already I know this NYU deal is a losing proposition. I live out the college freshman lie to hold on to the only thing in my life thats not in ruins—Ely.

I lied to Robin (Å) from psych class when I assured her that Robin (Ä) from that time at the Starbucks at Eighth and University Y her and will call her. Theres no $$$ for me to move into the school dorms, and Robins a sophomore with a rare single who goes home on the weekends and lets me use her place when I need to escape The Building. The apartment building where Ive lived my whole life may be situated on prime Greenwich Village real estate, but escape from it is my prime priority: escape from parent drama or my lies or Mr. McAllister, the creepy up-and-down elevator man who lives down the hall from Mrs. Loy and whos been ogling me since I was thirteen and my breasts first announced themselves in the elevator mirror.

Ive lied to Mom every time Ive told her Ive stayed the night at Robins when really Ive stayed over at my boyfriends dorm room. I lie to myself that I need to lie about my whereabouts. Its not like Bruce the Second and I are doing it. Were more about a & in bed, then turn out the light, and —just sleep—til he leaves in the morning for his accounting class. I lie to him that I think accounting is a worthwhile subject to study.

I lied to Robin (Ä) when he won our chess game in Washington Square Park after that time with Robin (Å), and the price of my loss was my supposed obligation to answer Truth to his midnight question. Robin said hed watched five men trip over themselves from checking me out, while I merely glared at them. Robin wanted to know if I use my beauty for good or evil. Evil, I assured him. Lie. Truth: Im as pure as fresh snow over Washington Square Park on a winter morning, before the dogs and people and machines of this hard, hard city batter its perfect, peaceful beauty.

I lied to Bruce the Second when I promised we would have sex, the real kind, soon. Very soon. Wed barely made it to ` when his R.A. walked in and interrupted us. It felt like cheating on Ely.

I lied to Bruce the First when I let him believe he would be my first. Ely is supposed to be first. I can wait. Then maybe Ill let Bruce the Second truly be second.

I lied to the three different men and one girl at the Astor Place Starbucks who eyed me in the wall mirror today and then wanted to sit in the empty chair opposite mine. I pretended I didnt hear them through my ?. They could go Ë themselves elsewhere. I placed my feet up on the empty chair, to reserve it for Ely. Only Ely.

Mostly, I lie to Ely. N lie to ee-lie.

Ely calls my cell while I lie in wait for him. “Im running late. Be there in about fifteen minutes. Hold my chair for me. Love you.” He hangs up before I can reply. I lie to Starbucks that I even drink Starbucks while lounging around in their chairs, killing time.

Weve already survived so much together, whats fifteen minutes more to wait for him? His absence is time gained to spool my un-truths.

I lied to Ely when I told him I forgive his mom for what happened between our parents. I lied to Ely that Im happy for him since his parents worked things out and stayed together even though mine didnt and now my dad lives not in The Building anymore, far away.

I lied to my mom that the damage is done but its fine if she needs to take her time to process the fallout before she can find her future. I lied by comforting her that I believe shell make it through. Its not that I dont think she can. She just doesnt want to.

I lie to all the related parties when I let them believe Dad calls my cell to check in on me every week. Once a month (the odd-numbered ones) is more like it.

Dads not worried about me. He knows I have Ely.

Ely rarely leaves me, or ends a phone call, without first telling me “I love you.” Its Elys way of saying “good-bye”—like a promise toward our future time together. I lie when I throw back the words “I love you, too.”

The complexity embedded in the different levels of meaning that go along with the words “I love you” ought to be a whole mindfuck of a video game, if anyone ever wanted to develop the concept.

Player One: Naomi.

Level 1: “I love you” to my mom, meaning I love you for giving me life, nurturing me, driving me crazy but still inspiring me, even through your heartache. Basic.

Level 2: “I love you” to my dad, said with sincerity thats tinged with coldness, distrustful whether he can actually deliver on the sentiment when he returns it. Harder.

Level 3: The playful “I love you” I throw at my boyfriend when he waits for me outside my class with a hot coffee and a donut. This grade of “I love you” is understood to have no intent whatsoever of L-O-V-E luuuv. Our relationship is too new for that, and he understands this, too. When Bruce the Second says “I love you” after I . . . do certain things with him, he is careful to immediately divert away, like “I love you when you yell at the frat guys making too much noise down the halls when were alone in my room. You give most excellent bitch tirade, and now all those guys only envy me more. I love you for that.” Whatever.

Levels 4-9: Expressions of passion for the great loves of my life, like disco music, Snickers bars, the Cloisters, the NBA, stairwell games, the luck to have a life lived with Ely.

Heres where the game gets trickiest.

Level 10 (but on a whole other plane, where maybe numbers cant even exist): When I tell Ely “I love you,” but Im not lying to him. Im lying to myself. He absorbs my words as if theyre natural, coming from his best friend / almost-a-sister. And Player One: Naomi does mean it that way. Genuinely. But maybe other ways, too. The confusing and impossible ways.

Game stalled.

Truth intrudes.

Lies are easier to process.

I lied to Ely that Im okay with gay. I am. Just not for Ely. He was supposed to belong to me in the Happily Ever After. Manifest destiny.

I lied to Ely that of course I recognized his true manifest destiny was the queendom of queerdom and hadnt that been obvious all along? Right! And great! Except not! Weve practically been promised to each other from childhood, grew up side by side, his family in 15J, mine in 15K. Naomi & Ely. Ely & Naomi. Never one without the other. Just ask any- one within a ten-block radius of the Fourteenth Street Whole Foods, where the entire Indian hot-bar section witnessed the disaster fallout between our two sets of parents. Naomi & Ely: played doctor (Å) / nurse (Ä) together; learned how to kiss while rehearsing in private for the lead roles in our junior high production of Guys and Dolls together; shared a locker and their high school experiences together; and chose to attend NYU together, chose to remain side by side at home instead of move into the nearby dorms, for reasons of cost efficiency and of Naomi & Ely co-dependency.

When Ely finally finds me at Starbucks, hes breathless and red-cheeked from running in the winter cold. He collapses into the chair Ive reserved for him.

I hand Ely the hot chocolate the Starbucks manager comped me. “Get up,” I tell him. “We gotta go.”

“Why, Naomi?” he pleads. “Why? I only just got here.”

I grab his free hand and were off, right back outside onto the cold, hard pavement, where we immediately fall into the typical Naomi & Ely routine of hand-and-cup-holding, hurried-walking-and-talking-while-maneuvering-through-sidewalk-people lockstep.

“Trust me,” I say.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375844409
Publisher:
Knopf Books for Young Readers
Subject:
Social Issues - Dating & Sex
Author:
Cohn, Rachel
Author:
Levithan, David
Author:
Rachel Cohn and David Levithan
Author:
Rachel Cohn and David Levithan
Subject:
Interpersonal Relations
Subject:
Dating (social customs)
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Homosexuality
Subject:
New york (n.y.)
Subject:
Situations / Dating & Sex
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Dating and Sex
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Copyright:
Publication Date:
August 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 9
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.40x5.82x.88 in. .82 lbs.
Age Level:
14-17

Related Subjects


Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Dating and Sex
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Homosexuality
Young Adult » General

Naomi and Ely's No Kiss List
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 240 pages Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers - English 9780375844409 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Longtime best friends Naomi and Ely live in the same Greenwich Village apartment building with their mothers while attending New York University. But after Ely, who is gay, kisses Naomi's boyfriend and lies about it, she stops speaking to him, even creating rules for avoiding each other; she does not care so much about her boyfriend, but finally understands Ely 'will never love me the way I love' him. Cohn and Levithan (Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist; see Reprints, below) once again create characters with attitude and fill their book with wordplay and witty conceits. But unlike Nick and Norah, Naomi and Ely come across as thoughtless and self-absorbed. Part of the problem may be that the authors rotate through the perspectives of numerous characters, including Ely's new boyfriend (Naomi's ex) and a fawning girl from Schenectady who seems to exist mainly to reinforce how cool Naomi is. These characters do not add much — with the exception of a vulnerable doorman who tries to connect with Naomi. Readers will laugh at the fun turns of phrase (Ely accuses Naomi of being 'a drama queen before we were old enough to go to Dairy Queen' and appreciate the clever duplication of characters (there are two Robins and two Bruces) which plays into the book's ideas about soul mates, or lack thereof. Naomi's narration is peppered with tiny icons, which look trendy but can be hard for readers to decipher. These playful touches, however, may not be enough to hold the audience's interest until Naomi and Ely reach their own important conclusions about love. Ages 14-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Told in a chorus of first-person voices, including Naomi and Ely as well as friends who are forced to choose sides, this loquacious relationship tale will date quickly, but that won't keep the authors' legions of fans from wanting it yesterday."
"Review" by , "A witty and highly entertaining exploration of love, friendship, and misunderstanding....The themes of sexual exploration and sexual identity, as well as strong language, which is entirely appropriate for the characters and setting, make this a book for older teens, who will love the oh-so-hip music and pop-culture references."
"Synopsis" by , Naomi is in love with her best friend, Ely, but Ely prefers boys. So they create a "No Kiss List" of people neither of them is allowed to kiss. It works fine — until Bruce enters the picture. Can these best friends come back together again?
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